Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1353007
Apolonia Ancient Art
$765.00
This attractive piece is a Roman bronze figurine of the god Mercury, and dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D. This piece is approximately 2.25 inches high, and is a complete example with no repair/restoration. This piece has an attractive light to dark green patina, along with some minute spotty red mineralized highlights. There is also some spotty light brown mineral deposits, and overall, this piece is in it's superb natural "as found" condition. This piece was cast as one piece from a mold, and was likely produced as a votive object for a temple, or for a private Roman shrine in a home known as a "lararium". Mercury is also the Roman name for the Greek god Hermes, and both gods had the same attributes, and are seen wearing a winged helmet or cap known as a "petasus". In addition, the figurine offered here is seen holding a money bag in his right hand, and a "caduceus" over his right shoulder along with a draped cloak. The "caduceus" also served as a herald's staff which possessed magical powers, and has two entwined snakes at the top. Hermes and Mercury both were the Greek and Roman gods of commerce, travel, and were the messengers of the gods. This nude figurine is also seen wearing a necklace, and stands by itself on it's own double tiered base. This piece was meant to be seen in it's upright position, as the base is very wide at the bottom. This piece for a small object has a great deal of eye appeal, and can be seen at a distance because of it's simplistic design. The face has a "mask-like" design, and imbues this piece with a magical haunting appearance. It's very likely that a religious pilgrim would have purchased this object as a votive donation to either a religious temple, or as an addition to a private shrine. This piece also sits on a custom raised display stand, and simply lifts off the stand. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1369191
Apolonia Ancient Art
$725.00
This intact and interesting piece is a Chancay child and crib textile doll that dates circa 1300-1532 A.D. This appealing piece is approximately 10.25 inches long, by 4.25 inches high, and is made from several types of Chancay textiles made from alpaca wool and cotton. The Chancay culture was centered on the central coast of Peru, and produced some of the finest textiles relative to all of the Andean pre-Columbian cultures. This piece is a young child seen lying within an elongated crib that is tightly wrapped with a white colored textile. The child is also tightly attached to the crib, and is seen wearing a multi-colored garment. The young child has long dark brown hair tied at the back of the head into a loose bun, and cascades over the side of the crib. The nose, eyes, and mouth are made from woven textiles, and appears to be very serene little girl. The short red woven hands are tightly woven, and resemble a "stick figure" with extended fingers and toes. The piece is also made with numerous textiles that are wrapped and formed around a reed superstructure, and these Chancay textile dolls and/or puppets were votive, as they promoted family and fertility in the afterlife. This piece also has outer garments that were custom made for this child figure, and are not simple wraps of textile scraps, as is usually seen on textile figures of this type. One of the best recorded examples of this type, as it is mint quality, and complete figurines of this type with custom garments are scarce in the market. (For the type see: "Pre-Columbian Art of South America" by Alan Lapiner, Abrams Pub., New York, 1976, nos. 678 and 679. See attached photo.) A custom Plexiglas case is included that protects this piece from environmental elements and insects such as moths. Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #678982
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This extremely rare piece is a bronze geometric horse that was cast in one solid piece. This attractive piece was made during the Geometric Period, circa 8th century B.C., and is approximately 3.1 inches high by 2.8 inches long. This piece is extremely early for the culture, and this can be seen relative to the artistic style with the elongated neck. This piece was probably part of a sacred necklace that may have been votive, and may have been shamanistic in nature. The stylized horse seen here may have been created as a "spirit" type animal, and this may explain the design. The design of the piece is also an early Geometric Period convention of art, and during this period, animals were designed with legs, tails, and necks that were elongated and thin. This piece also has a hoop seen on the top part of the body that connected this piece to the main body of the necklace by a chain. The hoop seen on the top part of the body may also have been broken in antiquity in order to break the "mana" and/or magic of the piece, and consequently, this piece may also have been votive. There were probably several animals and/or amulets connected to this type of necklace in antiquity, and the geometric horse pendant offered here is analogous to a piece that is now seen in the Museo di Villa Giulia, Rome (Inventory no. 53438, listed as being found at Palestrina, dated circa 8th-6th century B.C.). The bronze animals seen in the Museo di Villa Giulia example are also approximately one third of the size of the piece offered here. The Museo di Villa Giulia piece is a complete necklace, and has long-necked horse pendants, and small round shields that are individually connected to the necklace by attachment chains. The extremely rare piece offered here has a dark green patina with dark red highlights, and the dark red highlights are due to a high concentration of tin within the mix of metals. This piece is complete, except for the incomplete hoop, and it sits into the grooves of a clear custom plexiglas display stand. (Another rare analogous example was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, and was published in "Art of the Ancient World", Vol. XVIII, 2007, no. 58, $7,500.00 estimate. See attached photo.) Ex: F. Hirsch collection. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to culture, date, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1130376
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This appealing piece is a Greek terracotta mask that is in the form of a young God and/or King. This piece dates circa 2nd-1st century B.C., and is approximately 4.9 inches high by 4.7 inches wide. This intact piece is complete, and has spotty dark black and brown earthern deposits both on the front and back side surfaces. This beautiful piece was mold made from a light tan terracotta, and has sharp detail. This piece is in the form of a young God and/or King who is seen with an upward gaze, and is wearing a diadem band on the forehead. The diadem band is also a Greek Hellenistic symbol of royalty, along with being an emblem of sovereignty, and this mask may also portray a king and/or a character in an ancient Greek play. This terracotta mask is a votive type piece, and is likely a tragic type theater mask. Votive masks of this type were often dedicated to shrines by individuals who were linked to the theater, and were often dedicated after a trilogy of plays were performed that recounted one of the serious mythological dramas. The single hole seen at the top of the forehead also allowed this piece to hang as a votive offering, and is a scarce type. This piece also hangs on a custom black plexiglas stand, and has a great deal of eye appeal. Ex: David Leibert collection, New York, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1374638
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This pleasing Greek silver tetradrachm was minted in Amphipolis (Northern Greece) under Roman control, circa 167-149 B.C., is approximately 35mm wide, and grades EF(Extremely Fine)/EF(Extremely Fine). This piece has on the obverse (Obv.) the beautiful and draped bust of Artemis facing right, with a bow case behind, all within a dotted border. This bust is also seen centered on a Macedonian shield that has a border of stars and dots. Artemis is also seen with long flowing hair, and is an excellent image of the goddess. The entire design of the obverse is a shield design, and perhaps represents a shield type of the Macedonian royal house that was defeated under Perseus at Pydna, circa 168 B.C. The reverse (Rev.) shows the club of Herakles, with Greek lettering above and below, meaning MAKEDONON and PROTES (First region.). There are also three monograms, one above the club, and two below; and all this is within an ivy wreath with a dot-pattern thunderbolt symbol at the left. For twenty years, from circa 168-148 B.C., after the defeat of Perseus by the Romans, Macedonia was divided into four autonomous administrative regions in order to weaken the power of the area and increase dependence on the empire. The coin type offered here was minted in the first region (PROTES) at it's capital Amphipolis. The issue of the coin offered here was minted over a relatively short period of time, and this coin with it's superb artistic style and grade is becoming more scarce on the market. This piece has some mint luster, has extremely high relief, and is an exceptional coin minted under Roman control. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1989. References: SNG Copenhagen 1314; AMNG III 176. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1340583
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
These two rare Mayan pieces are two carved longbones that date to the Late Classic Period, circa 600-900 A.D. These pieces are approximately 4.3 and 4.6 inches high, and are approximately 1 inch in diameter at the widest point of each piece. These two pieces are intricately carved, and each feature the profile of a Mayan lord, who is seen wearing large jade earflares and an elaborate headdress. These pieces are also published in "The Face of Ancient America: The Wally and Brenda Zollman Collection of Precolumbian Art", Indianapolis Museum of Art, 1988, no. 84 (See attached photo.), and the following is the description of these rare pieces by John Carlson: "The headdresses contain images of long-lipped monsters. At the top of the bone pictured to the right is the profile face of some mammalian creature, possibly a peccary, which does have sky associations. The exact function of such carved bones in not known. They may have been handles for fans, bloodletter perforators, or even musical instruments. Some may also have been used as smoking tubes such as are usually depicted protruding from the forehead of God K. Schele and Miller have also discussed two fine examples of Mayan incised longbones; one is from a jaguar, and the other is a deer tibia. Both images and texts portray dynastic rites. Three additional bones published by Von Winning also present royal profile portraits, and two clearly show the drilled holes for suspension. These carved bones may have been worn as pectorals or attached to the costume for use in some specific, but as yet incompletely known dynastic function. In any case, all such carved bones are clearly high-status objects". The pieces offered here do not have any drilled holes for suspension, but could have, as there appears to be some of the leading edge missing on both ends of both pieces. These pieces are nearly complete, and are in superb condition for a perishable material such as bone, and are some of the best known published examples for the type. In addition, the carved bones offered here may be animal or human, and that fact was also unknown to the academics of the reference noted above, as the description reads: "Carved bone (human?)". The two sacred pieces offered here certainly had royal associations, and were likely used in some sacred regal ceremony and/or religious ritual. These two pieces also sit on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Wally and Brenda Zollman collection, circa 1970's. Published: "The Face of Ancient America", circa 1988. Exhibited: Indianapolis Museum of Art, circa 1988. Exhibited: Indiana University Art Museum, circa 1989. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1360469
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This exceptional piece is an Egyptian scarab that dates to the New Kingdom Period, XIX Dynasty, circa 1320-1200 B.C. This piece also falls within the period that Ramesses II ruled Egypt, circa 1304-1237 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.4 inches long, by .85 inches wide, by .7 inches high, and is in superb to mint condition with no repair and/or restoration. This piece is designed with the body of a beetle, and has a lovely light brown patina, with some minute white calcite and spotty black mineral deposits seen on various sections of the piece. This piece is a glazed steatite material and is a very solid example, as it also served as a seal that has a standing Bes god seen on the underside. The carving of this Bes image is also very deep, and the seal makes a very clear impression with high relief, as seen with the included clay impression that is attached to the custom display stand. This scarab amulet provided the wearer protection against evil, visible or invisible, and offered strength and power every day. In death, he or she who wore this amulet had the possibility of resurrection and being granted eternal afterlife, as this scarab ensured that the deceased heart would not give evidence against the deceased when he or she was being judged by the gods of the underworld. This scarab amulet also served as a seal with the image of Bes, who was a dwarf-like deity who was venerated as the protector of the home, family, and childbirth. The Bes seen on this beautiful piece is seen wearing a tall feather-crown, has a protruding tongue, and the ears of a lion. This piece is also very analogous to another scarce to rare example that is seen in the Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Inv. no. 76.031.3695. (See attached photo.) The scarce to rare piece offered here is also of exceptional quality, and is a type not often seen on the market. This piece also sits on a custom display stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1283823
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This visually appealing piece is a Roman marble of the goddess Minerva, and dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 8.75 inches high, by 5 inches wide. This piece is a helmeted bust of the Roman goddess Minerva, who also doubled as the Greek goddess Athena. This piece shows Minerva with finely carved hair that is seen under the edges of the Corinthian type helmet, and is a portrait of a young woman that conveys the eternal beauty of the goddess. She is also seen with a serene expression, and her rounded chin also conveys a goddess that is perceived as a powerful woman. The helmet also has a raised crest, and has an inset square dowel joint on each side that probably supported a running Pegasus that was mounted on each side of the helmet. In addition, this piece is carved in the round, and the helmet design is seen on the back side of the bust as well. The face is completely intact, with no major breaks, and the carving of the eyes, nose, and the delicate mouth is extremely detailed. The eyes also have center drilled dots with a carved circular iris, which give this piece a very dynamic "alive" look, and the treatment of the eyes in this fashion is typical for Roman portraiture especially during the Antonine Period, circa 2nd century A.D. This piece also has a nice light gray patina, with heavier dark gray mineral deposits seen at the back of the bust. This piece is also analogous in design to the earlier Greek Athenian coinage, circa 5th century B.C., which shows on the obverse a helmeted Athena in profile wearing a Corinthian type helmet, with a helmet crest and dotted necklace. This piece also follows the design of the Greek gold coinage of Alexander the Great, who placed a helmeted bust of Athena on the obverse of his gold staters, circa late 4th century B.C. This piece is scarce to rare on the market, as it likely completed a full size standing and draped statue of the goddess. The portrait type of this piece was derived from an earlier Greek prototype, which is thought to be a large full standing bronze cult statue that is known as the "Athena Sunias", which was displayed in a temple dedicated to Athena at Cape Sounion. (See G. Despinis, "Athena Sunias-Eine Vermutung", Archaologischer Anzeiger, 1999, pp. 173-181.) An analogous example without the helmet crest and dotted necklace, and of nearly the same size was offered by Halan J. Berk of Chicago, Ill. in "Ancient Art", 1987, no. 45. (See attached photo.) The Berk example was also mounted on a custom display stand, as the piece offered here, with a center pin running up into the lower neck where the break occurred. The piece offered here has a great deal of eye appeal, as the facial design of this piece, especially with the treatment of the eyes and delicate mouth, provide this piece with a very dynamic "alive" and "penetrating" look. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, circa 2000-2014, Inv.# P33-059-012614b. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1386365
Apolonia Ancient Art
$385.00
This piece is a Greco-Roman lead horse that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 1.5 inches long, by 1.25 inches high. This piece was a "votive" type object, and was likely sold to the devoted as solely a votive object for dedication at a shrine or grave. This horse may also represent a racing type horse, or one that was tied to a chariot, and may be part of a complete object such as a chariot. This piece was cast from two halves, and was mold made. The horse is complete, save for three of the lower legs, and is a better example that what is recorded, as it is scarce to rare. This piece also has nice detail with the head, and there are reigns that are visible on the neck and body. This piece is also likely Thracian in origin, as votive lead plaques were common for the period and region as well. This piece also has an attractive dark to light gray patina, with spotty dark black and brown highlights. This piece also is mounted on a custom display stand, and has nice eye appeal. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #956245
Apolonia Ancient Art
$625.00
These three pieces are being offered as one lot, as they are made from the same light red/tan clay fabric, and have similar light tan earthern deposits that have minute root marking. These three intact pieces are all classified as being Greek Corinthian, and date circa mid 6th century B.C. The first piece is an aryballos, that is approximately 2.25 inches high. This petite piece has some dark brown design elements that are seen at the rounded base, and is in superb condition, save for some unobtrusive chips that are seen below the lip. The second piece is a thin walled skyphos, that is approximately 3.1 inches high by 6 inches wide handle to handle. This piece is also in superb condition, save for a minute chip at the base that may be from antiquity. The third piece is a exaleiptron, otherwise known as a "kothon", which was used as a funerary ritual vessel that contained aromatic oil. This piece is also in superb condition, save for a minute chip at the end of one of the two handle flares. This vessel has a low foot ring and has traces of geometric light brown painted line design under the earthern deposits. All three of the superb vessels offered here may have been used in a votive funerary ritual as well. All three of these pieces are in an intact "as found" condition, although they have little or no glaze with heavy tan earthen deposits. Corinthian vessels, such as the three examples offered here, were also exported throughout the ancient Greek world during the 6th century B.C., and competed for markets with ancient Greek Attic ceramics. An interesting group that is being offered as one lot. Ex: Arte Primitivo, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 2000's. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1351887
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This rare and esoteric piece is an Olmec seated duck poison bottle that dates circa 1100-800 B.C. This vessel is attributed to the Las Bocas region of Mexico, and is approximately 2.4 inches high. This piece has an attractive lustrous black glaze, along with some spotty light brown burnishing that is seen on all of the outer surfaces of the vessel. This piece is also intact, and has no repair/restoration. This piece is also in the form of a hollow container, as the top of the head has an opening into the hollow section of the lower body. This type of vessel is also known as a "poison bottle", as they generally held a substance such as red cinnabar or another hallucinogenic powder or liquid. This vessel was likely used in a ceremonial capacity, and this was likely the case for the majority of glazed Olmec vessels that depict birds such as ducks, raptors, and songbirds. (Another analogous "poison bottle" vessel of this type portraying a raptor is seen in "The Olmec World: Ritual and Rulership", Princeton University, 1996, Harry Abrams Pub., no. 61, p. 183. See attached photo.) The esoteric vessel offered here has a very animated face with dotted eyes, and two squat legs and an extended tail that serve as a tripod base for the vessel. There is also a "double dot-and-bar" symbol seen between the eyes, and the eyes also appear to represent dots as well. The "four-dots-and-bar" motif is also thought to represent the "axis mundi", as the conduit between the Olmec natural and supernatural realms, and the two dotted eyes together with the "double dot-and-bar" symbol, may be a representation of the "four-dots-and-bar" motif. The symbolism seen on this piece also reinforces the theory that this piece was created as a ceremonial type vessel. This piece is an exceptional example of Olmec ceramic art, and is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Ferdinand Anton collection, Germany, circa 1959. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #579338
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,625.00
This x-large Roman glass jug dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 7.5 inches high by 5.8 inches in diameter. This beautiful piece is also in mint condition, with no stress cracks and/or chips. This pleasing light green vessel has beautiful multi-colored iridescence and nice minute root marking. There are also five decorative wheel-cut (lathe) bands that run around the main body of the piece, and these bands may also have served as a measurement indicator of the level of the contained liquid. This was likely the case, as the five cut bands are evenly spaced on the vessel. There is also a thick strap handle that was applied to the upper shoulder and below the lip. The lip of this attractive vessel was also turned out and down, which formed a rounded edge. (For an analogous example, see Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2001, no.213. This vessel is approximately 9.25 inches high, and has eleven decorative wheel-cut bands, three of which are deeply cut. $20,000.00-$30,000.00 estimates, and realized $23,500.00. Another recent comparable sold at Cristie's Antiquities, London, April 2010, no. 98, for 5625 Pounds, approximately $7600.00, and had 5,700-7,900 pounds estimates. This vessel is approximately 6.5 inches high and is a light green color with six decorative wheel-cut bands. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is an exceptional large example of early Roman blown glass, is very analogous to the two examples noted above, and is scarce in this mint quality condition. Ex: Private English collection. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1288982
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This rare coin is a Greek bronze (22mm) that was minted in the ancient Greek city of Amphaxitis, and dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 196-168 B.C. This piece is graded VF+/EF-, weighs 7.5 gms, and is one of the few best quality examples that have been recorded. This piece shows on the Obverse: The bearded bust of Herakles facing right, with his club seen behind his head, within a dotted border; and the Reverse: The club of Herakles, with the name of the city in Greek lettering seen above and below, all within an olive wreath. This piece also has a nice thick and even dark green/blue patina, and is a superb example for this rare issue. Amphaxitis was a Greek trading city which was approximately 50 kilometers north of the modern city of Thessaloniki. This city facilitated trade between the Greeks on the coast of Macedonia, and the Thraco-Macedonian tribes on the interior. The city was subsequently settled by veterans of the army of Alexander the Great. Sear 1376. BMC 5.1,2. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Faience : Pre AD 1000 item #1315066
Apolonia Ancient Art
$8,865.00
This attractive and extremely rare piece is an Egyptian faience aryballos that dates to the Late Period, Dynasty XXVI, circa 664-525 B.C. This extremely large piece is approximately 4.25 inches high, by 3.6 inches in diameter, and is one of the largest recorded examples. This turquoise blue piece was mold made from faience, and was then hand sculpted which produced the sharp details and design features that are seen on this esoteric piece. This piece also has a spherical body with five registers, and there is a small circular depression seen on the bottom which is surrounded by thirty-two pedals with a detailed double row of lotus leaves seen above. There is also a cross-hatching design that is seen through the middle of the body, with two rows of pedals above. This piece was also designed with a short cylindrical neck, along with an inward-sloping disk rim and a wide attached strap handle. There are some spotty light brown deposits seen in various sections of the outer surfaces, and considerable white calcite deposits that are seen on the inside of the vessel. This piece also has some skillful old repair, as this piece was repaired from three large fragments, and is 100% original. This extremely rare piece may have been produced in Naukratis, a port in the Egyptian delta that was founded by Greeks in the 7th century B.C. Naukratis was an exclusive Greek community organized by Amasis, and many of it's exports found their way into many foreign markets, including the Etruscans who coveted Greek and Egyptian objects. This type of extremely large faience aryballos is also listed as being produced in Rhodes by V. Webb in "Archaic Greek Faience", Warminster, 1978. (See nos. 705 and 743. No. 705 is approximately the same size as the piece offered here. See attached photo.) Another extremely rare example was sold in Cahn Auktionen AG, Basil, Switzerland, Sept. 2010, no. 72. (SF 9,000.00 estimate, SF 12,000.00 realized. The Cahn example is approximately the same size as the piece offered here, has very analogous main body cross-hatching design, upper shoulder pedal design, and was repaired from large fragments as the example offered here. See attached photo.) The piece offered here also stands by itself, and a clear Plexiglas display stand is also included. Ex: Private European collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2003, no. 41. ($8,000.00-$12,000.00 estimates. See attached photo.) Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1293208
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This primitive, but esoteric piece is a Chontal culture seated mother goddess that dates circa 300-100 B.C. This piece is approximately 4.9 inches high, by 3.4 inches wide, by 1.9 inches thick. This piece was carved from a single piece of hard green serpentine stone, and is an attractive dark green, with spotty light brown and black colors. This piece has a nice patina with some calcite deposits seen in some of the minute veins that run on the outer surface of this piece, and there is some minute root marking as well. In addition, this piece was polished in antiquity, and has a bright surface. This piece is also intact, with no repair/restoration, and has a small excavation mark on the back side. This piece is a "mother goddess" type, and is seen seated and holding her hands to her breasts. This attractive piece is also likely a fertility type piece, as this "mother goddess" emphasizes her breasts that are full of "mother's milk". This piece also emphasizes the Chontal culture artistic style which shows coffee bean eyes, double-line lips, square nose, and incised lines for the fingers and toes. This piece also shows the head slightly angled to the left, which offers this piece a more animated appearance. The Chontal culture is also contemporary with the Mezcala culture, and the design of the Chontal figurines have more rounded and defined features than the Mexcala culture, which tend to have very angular lines and features. The type of piece seen here is scarce to rare, and is not often seen on the market. This piece can also stand by itself, and simply sits on the included display base. (For the type see: Carlo Gay and Frances Pratt, "Mezcala", Geneva, 1992.) Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Howard Rose collection, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1385409
Apolonia Ancient Art
$975.00
This scarce piece is a Moche stirrup-vessel with a mythical creature, and dates circa 450-600 A.D., Moche IV-V Periods. This interesting piece is approximately 10.9 inches high, and is intact with no repair and/or restoration. This piece has alternating dark red and light tan colors, and features a mythical creature running right with a toothy open mouth, and is holding a sacrificial tumi with an extended arm. This creature also appears to be in flight, and there are also three symbols seen above the main body of this creature. The raised stirrup-spout also has dotted designs that match the dotted designs seen on the main body of the creature. The entire vessel is rendered with half of the vessel in dark red, and the other half in light tan colors, and this may represent day and night, and/or the living and the spirit world. An interesting Moche piece that is a reflection of human sacrifice that was a religious part of their culture. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1313512
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This appealing piece is a Greek Hellenistic period bronze torso of a striding Herakles, and dates circa 3rd-1st century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.1 inches high, and is mounted on a custom display stand. This piece shows a striding nude Herakles who is seen wearing his lion's skin cloak draped over his left shoulder and arm, and this cloak is attached by a round fibula seen on his right shoulder. This lion's skin cloak is also designed with a stippled dotted design, which denotes this garment as being made from an animal skin. This torso has an intact left arm, and this Herakles figurine appears to be holding a round patera or possibly a vessel of some sort. This figurine also has both muscular legs, with the right leg seen striding forward, and the movement of this powerfully muscular body is easily seen. The torso is very well defined, and displays a very high degree of art, and is much better than most figurines of this type. This attractive piece also has an exceptional dark green/blue patina, and is evenly seen around the entire piece. This piece is an exceptional Greek bronze torso with an equally exceptional patina, and is scarce on today's market in this condition. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1288894
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This attractive piece is a Greek silver straining spoon that dates circa 3rd century B.C.-1st century A.D. This rare piece is approximately 4.9 inches long, by .9 inches in diameter at the bowl. This piece was hand beaten into shape, and the bowl was formed over a mold and attached to the shaft. There are five holes seen in the base of the bowl, and this piece likely served as a rare spice strainer at the table of a wealthy individual. There is also a curled hoop at the end, and this likely was hung in an ancient kitchen/household. This piece may also have served in a commercial capacity, and may also have been used to measure out a valuable "powder" type commodity. This specialized silver piece is seldom seen on the market, as it has fine construction and is seldom found as an individual type find. This piece also is somewhat analogous to the late Hellenistic silver spoon that is known as a "cochleare", as this type of piece also has a small rounded bowl which is attached to a shaft with a pointed terminal end. This type of "cochleare" spoon does not have any holes in the bottom of the bowl, and is thought to have been used for eating eggs and shellfish. For the "cochleare" type see: "Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate" by D.E. Strong, Methuen & CO., Ltd., 1966, p. 155. The complete piece offered here also has an attractive dark gray patina, and is intact with no repair/restoration. This dainty little piece is an exceptional example of Greek silver plate, and is seldom seen on the market. This piece hangs on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1323161
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This exceptional piece is an early Greek Athenian silver tetradrachm that dates circa 500-490 B.C., and is classified in "Group L" by Seltman. This coin is approximately 25mm wide, weighs 16.61 gms, and is in mint state condition (FDC/FDC). This coin has a very light gray patina with some minute spotty dark black deposits, and has a beautiful natural "as found" patina. This exceptional coin has the helmeted head of Athena facing right seen on the obverse, and the reverse has a facing standing owl, with an olive sprig behind, and the Greek lettering (A-TH-E) before. The standing owl was also the "civic badge" of Athens, and was widely recognized in the ancient Greek world. This coin also has perfect centering, in addition to, extremely high relief which are factors that make this coin one of the top examples that have been seen on the market. This coin was also likely minted shortly before the battle of Marathon, circa 490 B.C., and was likely used to help expand the Athenian forces that opposed the invading Persian military juggernaut. The helmeted Athena is also a masterpiece of Greek Archaic art, with the slightly smiling face of Athena and the large almond-shaped eyes which are hallmarks of the Archaic Period. The bust of Athena also has a sculptural quality and design that is not often seen on prior or subsequent Athenian issues. This piece also displays a full crest and neckline that is not often seen as well, as this piece has perfect centering and was minted on a large and full flan. Overall, this coin is one of the finest specimens known for the type due to the reasons noted above, along with the fact that this piece has exceptional artistic style which also contributes to this coin's beauty and eye appeal. References: Svoronos, Pl. 6, No. 11. and Seltman, Pl. XV, A214/P275. Ex: Private German collection circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1304362
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This attractive piece is a Greek Boeotian blackware kantharos, and dates circa 450-425 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.6 inches high, by 7.5 inches wide from handle to handle, and is a large example. This esoteric piece has a nice even lustrous black glaze, with a multi-colored iridescent patina over the glaze, and a high degree of eye appeal. This Greek kantharos is a Classic Period type vessel, as can be seen with the two looped handles and the long stemmed base, and this piece is also classified as being a "Type A" type due to this design. This type of piece is also seen on many Greek Classical Period coins and painted ceramics. This type of vessel was used for drinking wine at drinking parties which is known as a "symposium", and was also used for ceremonial offerings. This superb and beautiful piece is intact, and has some spotty white calcite deposits seen in various sections of the piece, and is heavy at the inner bottom of the vessel. There is also some minor roughness seen in sections of the inner bowl, otherwise this piece is in near flawless condition. This piece also have a deep even black glaze seen on the inner and outer surfaces, and there are no pressure cracks and/or repair seen anywhere on this vessel. (Another analogous example was offered at Christie's Antiquities, London, Oct. 2011, no. 71. This piece was approximately 11 inches high, with a faint painted white ivy tendril that runs around the main body of the vessel. $4,600.00-$7,500.00 estimates, $9,246.00 realized.) (Another analogous example can be seen in the Louvre Museum, Paris, Inv. no. MNC 670, and bears an incised inscription that is a sacred dedication. The lengthy inscription is in the Boeotian alphabet, and this vessel is thought to have come from Thespiae.) The attractive piece offered here is scarce to rare in this intact condition, and is seldom offered on the market. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1311165
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This cute piece is a Roman bronze seated Silenus that dates circa 1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 1.9 inches high, and is a complete intact piece that has no repair/restoration. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina with some spotty red highlights, and was cast as one piece. This piece shows a nude drunken and drinking Silenus seated on a rock, and he is holding a kantharos in his left hand, and his right hand is raised with an open palm and raised thumb. This pose with the open palm is also thought to have been a popular gesture used by actors in the Greek and Roman theater. (For a description of these various theatrical poses and gestures see: "The History of the Greek and Roman Theater", by Margarete Bieber, Princeton University Press, 1939.) The Silenus seen here has the typical bald head, pot belly, short legs, and had human and horse attributes. The eyes and facial features are very well detailed, and this piece is a nice example of this mythical creature who was the companion and tutor of Dionysus. This piece also has a round insert below the piece, and this is an indication that this piece may have been part of a group bronze sculpture made from several figurines. This piece also has a small flat section on top of the head, and this may have been designed to support another object and/or figurine as well. A nice Roman bronze with a great deal of eye appeal. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, New York and Geneva, circa late 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) This piece also sits on a custom display stand, and simply lifts off the stand. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1340042
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This complete piece is a Greek silver neck section for a vessel, and dates circa 5th-4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 4 inches diameter, by 2.8 inches high. This piece is slightly oval in shape, and has slightly sloping sides. This piece has exceptional workmanship, and was hammered into shape from one solid sheet of silver. In addition, this piece has an extremely detailed beaded lip border, with minute beading which only a skilled artist could have produced. This piece was made as a section for a large silver vessel such as a hydria, or a stamnos, and both of these vessel types had an extended neck that reached upwards from the main body of the vessel, along with handles that were attached to the main body of the vessel. This pieced may also have been produced for fitting into a ceramic vessel body, and although this is rare, it is a known type of use. This piece likely was never used, and could have been made as a votive type use, and was never intended for use in real life. This piece also could have been produced for use into a silver vessel at a later time, as was perhaps lost in the production process, or became war booty that was hoarded away. Whatever the case, this piece is a rare example as a section such as this, and is an excellent case study as to how a complete silver vessel could have been produced. This piece also appears to be a complete neck section, with no apparent cut marks showing in the lower edge, although there is some lower edge roughness that is to be expected. This piece also has an attractive dark to light gray patina, and there are some sections that have spotty dark to light black mineral deposits, along with some additional minute mineralization and root marking. This type of piece is seldom seen on the market, and is an exceptional example for the type. This piece also sits on a custom metal and Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Private New Jersey collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1354392
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This superb piece is a Greek bronze oinochoe that dates circa mid 5th century B.C. This complete piece is approximately 6 inches high, and is an intact example with no repair/restoration. This intact piece is in superb to mint condition, with only some very minor scrapes and minute dents, which makes it much better than what is normally seen on the market. This piece has a flat bottom and easily stands by itself, and has a graceful upper shoulder and extended neck that runs up into a trefoil spout. This piece also has an added handle that is solid, and attaches to the main body of the piece and at the top of the trefoil spout. This piece was hand beaten from one sheet of bronze and graduates in thickness from the bottom to the spout lip which is at it's thinnest point. The piece also has a beautiful and even dark green patina with some dark brown, light blue, and red highlights, and in addition, there is some attractive minute root marking. The workmanship of this piece is exceptional, and this piece has a very graceful and compact shape. The shape and/or form of this vessel is also seen relative to numerous ceramic examples that copy it's graceful size and shape. This piece was used for fine dining, and likely held a concentrated wine that was mixed with water. This piece also made it very easy to pour a liquid, as the trefoil spout could pour a liquid in three directions. A piece with a great deal of eye appeal, and is scarce in the market in this superb condition. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is included for the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Coins : Pre AD 1000 item #1150976
Apolonia Ancient Art
$265.00
This is a group of three (3) late Roman bronze coins that were minted by the emperor Gratian. These coins were minted circa 367-383 A.D., and are all AE 3 (17 mm) and grade EF to Superb. Coins A,B. and C (left to right) all show the pearl-diademed and draped bust of Gratian facing right on the obverse. The reverse shows - Coin A: Gratian advancing right, dragging captive and holding labarum, GLORIARO-MANORVM left and right, H right field. (Sear no. 4142.) Coin B: Victory advancing left, SECVRITAS-REIPVBLICAE left and right. (Sear no. 4143.) Coin C: Gratian advancing right, dragging captive and holding labarum, GLORIARO-MANORVM left and right, H left field, Star and P right field (Sear no. 4142.) All three of these detailed coins are slightly different with different symbols, and are all minted in the Siscia mint (Sisak, former Yugoslavia), as indicated by the SIS as seen below the ground line on the reverse of all three coins. All three coins have a beautiful glossy dark green patina, and have exceptional line designed detail. (A coin with a EF grade, Gratian dragging a captive reverse type, sold in Gorny & Mosch, March 2012, for $106.00.) Ex: Harlan J. Berk, circa 1980's. I certify that these coins are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1226370
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This beautiful piece is a Graeco-Roman bronze that dates circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This complete piece is approximately 3.5 inches high, and stands by itself on it's own base. This type of nude female Graco-Roman piece is known as the "Aphrodite Anadyomene", whose name signifies the birth of the goddess from the foam of the sea. The Greek goddess Aphrodite was born from the sea foam created when the severed genitals of Uranus were cast into the sea. Like many other naked figures of the goddess Aphrodite, the "Anadyomene" was not posed to conceal the body, and has arms raised to the hair which exposes the body to the gaze. In the Hellenistic and Roman periods, each hand is seen lifting and/or wringing the wet hair strands that hang down to the shoulders, as Aphrodite was seen rising from the sea at her birth. Her head is also seen slightly bent, her face is generally seen with a long straight nose with a small mouth, and she usually has wide hips and thighs. All of these features noted above create an impression of youthful fertility, and portray Aphrodite as having eternal youth and beauty. The piece offered here displays all of these features, and in addition, the "Aphrodite Anadyomene" is portrayed in a "contrapposto pose", with the weight carried on one leg with a slight twist to the waist. For the type, see Margarete Bieber, "The Sculpture of the Hellenistic Age", New York: Columbia University Press, 1955. The piece offered here has the features attributed to the "Aphrodite Anadyomene" sculptural type as noted above, including the rolled hair that is seen coiled into a bun with a small tie at the front. The piece seen here is an exceptional example of the type, as the face is very sensual with the long nose and slight smile. This piece is also complete, is cast with it's own base, and is intact with a beautiful dark green patina with red highlights. This piece is scarce on the market in this complete and superb condition, and it also sits on an included custom Plexiglas stand. Ex: Frank Sternberg collection, Zurich, Switzerland, circa 1980's. Ex: Antiqua Ancient Art, Los Angeles, CA. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1377885
Apolonia Ancient Art
$925.00
This superb vessel is a Chimu/Lambayeque blackware stirrup-vessel that dates circa 1100-1400 A.D. This intact vessel is approximately 8.5 inches high, and has a solid black lustrous glaze with some attractive dark brown burnishing. There is some minute spotty black mineral deposits, and this intact piece is in superb condition with no repair/restoration. This piece shows a bust of a god with projecting serpent heads on each side of the central spout, four panels on the upper shoulder with facing nobles with collars and crested "tumi-type" headdresses, and a single handle with two attached prone adoration figures that are facing one another. The god bust has fine incised facial details, and may represent the legendary Lambayeque king "Naymlap". The two facing prone figures seen on the handle may be depicted as "riding" or "flying" on the handle, which also refers to the myth of "Naymlap", who was thought to have flown into the sky. This vessel may also be a "ceremonial type" vessel that was used for libations, and the vessel offered here has exceptional surfaces, and is more detailed than other vessels of this type. Another analogous example is seen in Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, May 27, 1998, no. 244. ($500.00-$700.00 estimates, $460.00 realized. See attached description/photo.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1288546
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This beautiful piece is a Greek gold diadem wreath that dates circa 3rd-1st century B.C. This piece is approximately 13 inches long by 1.4 inches high, and is a complete example. This intact piece has no restoration/repair, and is 100% original. This piece has eight large leaves, with four on each side that meet at the front center of the piece. The eight leaves are each attached to a band with attachment tabs, and these tabs are punched through the band and are folded back on the back side of the piece. There are two hooks at each end, and they simply tied this piece together at the back of the head. The overall construction of this piece is rather simple, but this also provided for a piece that has a great deal of eye appeal, as the leaves are easily seen on the crown of the head. This piece was also likely made for a young woman or child, and could have been worn during special events or in the grave. This piece is also a type that first appeared in the Hellenistic Period, and was popular throughout the ancient Greek world. This piece has some strength, and stays in a fixed position on it's custom display stand. This piece can also easily be removed from it's custom display stand, and once removed, can also be displayed on it's own, as it solidly put together. This piece also has some light brown deposits, some minute black dotted mineral deposits seen in various sections, and some spotty minute root marking. The color of this piece also is a brilliant gold, and has a beautiful faint multi-colored iridescent patina. One of the best examples for the type. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Pre AD 1000 item #1343481
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This superb piece is a Japanese samurai katana sword that dates to the Edo Period, circa 1603-1868 A.D. This piece is approximately 36 inches long, from the tip to the end handle cap. The blade is approximately 28-28.5 inches long, as the tang is centered within the handle wrapping, and this is an approximate size due to the tang being wrapped. This piece was also handle rewrapped by the Royal Ontario Museum under the supervision of David Pepper, who was the curator of the Japanese Arms and Armor Department. He also authenticated this piece to the Edo Period, circa 1603-1868, as the tang also has the stamped signature of a swordsmith signed Yoshinao, who lived in Seki City in old Mino, Japan. This swordsmith also had many ancestors with his same name that worked in the same city as well, and are well known for producing many swords during during WWII. It's also extremely likely that the piece offered here was subsequently remounted, in addition to the handle being rewrapped in WWII for use in a Military mount, as all Japanese officers were required to wear a sword. The handle wrappings now seen on the impressive piece offered here likely replaced the old military mounts and wrapping. The handle fittings and bronze round hilt guard (tsuba) now seen on this piece also date to the Edo Period, and may have been original to the piece along with the other handle fittings, and were all incorporated into the original and previous military handle wrappings. This may have been done for traditional reasons, as swords of this type were and are regarding as having a "living energy". This piece was originally made for a samurai warrior in feudal Japan, and was designed for battle using two hands. This remarkable piece also has an extremely fine razor sharp blade, which defines this piece as being among the finest cutting weapons in world military history. One truly has to handle this weapon with care, as this blade is still razor sharp and a slight slip would likely result in injury. The Edo Period fittings also feature a scarce gold gilt protector deity face that is seen peeking out of the handle wrappings on Side A, and in addition, there are gold inlayed symbols and/or lettering seen within the Edo Period round bronze hilt guard (tsuba). The bronze end cap has very elaborated designs as well. This piece was also produced by hammering layers of steel with different carbon concentrations, and this process was very labor extensive and involved several people working together in unison. The extensive hammering removed impurities within the metal, and this resulted in a stronger blade. The constant hammering and cooling of the blade with water also resulted in a wavy line seen on the side of the blade that is called the "hamon", which is made more distinct by polishing. Each "hamon" and each smith's style of "hamon" is very distinct, and is in fact analogous to a fingerprint. The blade on the piece offered here was polished into a mirror like finish, and is in superb condition. The blade surface has some minor and light brown age spots that are not very noticeable which show the age of the blade, and one can easily polish the blade to remove these if one wishes to do so. David Pepper also left this patina to show the age of the blade, and his rewrapping of the handle follows traditional Japanese form and construction. This piece also sits on a custom wooded stand, and has a great deal of eye appeal. This piece is a traditional Japanese work of art, and is one of the most distinctive weapons known in the world today. Ex: David Pepper collection, circa 1960's. Exhibited: Royal Ontario Museum, Canada, circa 1980's. Ex: Paul Haig collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1281520
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This scarce piece is a Greek Messapian stamnos that dates circa early 4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 10.25 inches high, by 9.8 inches in diameter. This large and decorative example has a knobbed lid at the top, and two raised handles that are seen on the upper shoulder of the vessel. This piece is a light tan terracotta, with some light brown and red concentric circles that run around the main body of the piece, and these decorative elements are also seen on the knobbed raised lid. This piece also has a "drip designed" decorative element that is seen running around the upper shoulder, and the upper top section of the lid. This "drip designed" decorative element was formed by simply dripping the glaze onto the surface of the vessel, and this formed the individual teardrop marks that are seen within the entire design that runs around the piece. This Greek vessel is also classified as being "Messapian", which refers to the geographical region of southern Italy, but this classification is a bit of a misnomer, as it is probable that "Messapian" type ceramics were produced by Greek artists for the local non-Greek populace. This may also explain why this type of large-scale "Messapian" type piece is scarce to rare, and is seldom seen on the market. This piece is also a large example for the type, and it is intact, save for some minor repair to the lid, and overall, this piece is a superb example that is 100% original. This piece has some minute spotty black mineral and white calcite deposits, seen mostly on the interior of the vessel. This type of vessel has a flat bottom, and was ideal for grain storage, and this piece was also likely used for everyday use. It may also have been votive, with an offering within, and this type of piece also served as a burial urn. This piece has nice eye appeal, and is a large decorative example. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1950's-1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1345277
Apolonia Ancient Art
$575.00
These three interesting pieces are three bronze belt fittings that are (1) one Roman, (1) one Byzantine, and (1) one Viking example. The Roman example dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and is approximately 2.4 inches long. This complete piece is a "strap buckle" in the form of a running panther, and has an open belt bar at one end, and a belt hook at the other. The Byzantine example dates circa 4th-6th century A.D., and is approximately 1.5 inches long, by .5 inches high. This complete piece has an almond shaped form, and has four small grip knobs at each of the four sides. This piece is a "strap slide", and held several belt ends in place. This piece may also have been part of a sword scabbard, or another form of armor. The third pice is a Viking example that dates circa 9th-11th century A.D., and is approximately 2.4 inches long, by 1 inch wide. This intricate piece has two bronze sheets riveted together that formed a "belt band strap", and two rivets are seen at the terminal end. In addition, this piece is the fragmented terminal end of the strap, and has an intricate and interwoven design seen on the outer face that resembles a textile. All three of these interesting pieces have a dark to light green patina, and are complete save for the Viking example. All three pieces are mounted on a custom and clear Plexiglas stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. For the Viking example: Ex: Private Denmark collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1356984
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This Roman gold earring with a shield emblem is a complete example, and dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This attractive and large example is approximately 1.1 inches in diameter, and weighs 3.5 grams. This piece is a solid example, and is not plated. The shield emblem seen on this superb piece has a dotted decorative element in the center, and a beaded border. The clasp has been wired shut, as the wearer likely wore this piece everyday. The clasp can be adjusted so that it can be easily worn today, and the hoop is very durable as it has a large diameter. The shield emblem also has a single rivet that attaches it to the solid gold hoop, and this adds additional strength and durability to this beautiful example. This piece also has some spotty dark red/brown deposits, and can easily be cleaned. This piece is a very collectable example of ancient jewelry, and is an exceptional large piece. For the type see: Ruseva-Prokoska L., "Roman Jewelry, A Collection of National Archaeological Museum", Sofia, Bulgaria, 1991, nos. 30-35. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1393793
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This mint quality Greek Paestan "applied red-figure" hydria dates circa 360-350 B.C., and is approximately 11.2 inches high. This piece is attributed to the Asteas-Python workshop, and is an early piece with many attributes of the Asteas painter. This lovely hydria is in flawless condition, and has some spotty white calcite deposits seen mostly on the back of the piece that has a large palmate fan design. The front of this piece has two figures, one seated woman at the right that is seen nude from the waist up holding a mirror, and a standing draped woman that is seen holding a fillet. The upper shoulder has a beautiful "ivy leaf and berry" wreath design that runs around the vessel, and meets with a rosette at the front center of the piece. There are also two female busts, one seen under each handle, and one appears to be older than the other, and may represent Demeter, and her daughter Persephone. This piece also has a deep black glaze, and this thick even glaze is also seen running down inside the raised neck as well. This piece has attributes that are attributed to the Asteas painter such as: identical line design of the woman's busts seen under each handle that have incised hair and upper shoulder incised drapery, extended chins, thick lower lips, and large dotted eyes. In addition, the standing woman seen on the front side has a single stripe running down the drapery, and the seated nude woman has a thin waist and elongated upper torso. All of these attributes are classified as being attributed to early Asteas ceramics as seen in A.D. Trendall, "The red-Figured Vases of Paestum", British School at Rome, pp. 63-80. Michael Padgett of Princeton University also commented that this vessel was produced with the "applied red-figure" production technique, rather than the "red-figure" production technique, and both production techniques are entirely different. The "red-figure" ceramics were produced with the black glaze outlining where the figures went on the piece, and the red glaze was then added on this reserve. With the "applied red-figure" production technique, the black glaze covered the entire vessel, and the red glaze was applied over the black glaze. Incised detailing was sometimes added to the figures, as was the case regarding the lovely vessel offered here, and these pieces are rare to extremely rare. Consequently, this intact piece is seldom seen on the market, and is an exceptional early example attributed to the Asteas painter workshop. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Royal Athena Gallery, New York, and Published in "One Thousand Years of Ancient Greek Vases", Nov. 1990, no. 166 (Listed at $9,500.00). Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1367808
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This scarce Moche piece is an owl priest seated on a raised platform, and dates circa 300-500 A.D., Moche III-IV Periods. This powerful piece is approximately 9.4 inches high, and has vibrant dark red and cream colors. This piece depicts a Moche priest in a full owl costume with a mask and wings, a raised crown, and ceremonial bracelets. He is also seen seated on a ceremonial throne that is perched atop a multi-layered platform. The owl priest also depicts the Moche deity that is seen in the "Presentation Theme", which is a Moche ceremony of sacrifice as defined by Christopher Donnan. (See "Moche Art of Peru" by Christopher Donnan, University of California, Los Angeles, CA., 1978, pp. 158-174.) This Moche owl deity, seen in the "Presentation Theme", is also defined as "Figure B", who is also handing a goblet with sacrificial blood to a principle figure in the scene. The owl was sacred to the Moche because of it's night vision and sharp hunting skills at night, and because of their nocturnal nature, they were associated with death and were thought to travel between the living and spirit world. The eyes of the owl priest's mask are very animated, and the overall piece has very high eye appeal. This piece is intact, with no apparent repair/restoration, and has some minute black spotty mineralization. This piece also has a flat bottom and is very stable. Ex: Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1970's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL authentication document from Kotalla Lab, Germany, no. 36R270317, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1372853
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This powerful piece is a seated Vicus/Early Mochica shaman lord that dates circa 400-200 B.C., Early Intermediate Period. This piece is approximately 9 inches high, by 6.3 inches wide from elbow to elbow. This powerful looking piece is a seated shaman/lord that is seen with crossed legs and his hands resting on each knee. His elbows are also extended outwards, which adds to the regal visual impact of this rare Andean ceramic. He is seen wearing a skull cap that extends down to the middle of his back and "barrel-designed" torso. He is also seen wearing thick bracelets, and appears to have nude arms and upper chest. There are also sacred "wave-pattern" facial tattoos, and large ears that have a small vent hole centered within each ear. The most distinct feature of this regal seated shaman/lord, is his single "dotted-designed" protruding right eye, which is also visually enhanced with his missing left eye. This piece also has very realistic facial features, and it may be that the missing eye was lost in battle, or that the entire face seen is one that is undergoing a state of "transformation", from the living to the spirit world, or vice-versa. This exceptional piece has a thick red and cream colored glaze, with some spotty black mineral deposits. This piece is also intact, save for a small filled connection hole at the back of the vessel, as this piece was the forepart of a two-chambered vessel. The back chamber may also have been ceremoniously broken away, as this piece may also have been a sacred ceremonial offering. This piece also foreshadows the early Mochica I Period vessels that have an analogous glaze, and is a rare transitional type piece. This piece not only has a very powerful spiritual presence, but is also an extremely rare type not often seen on the market. Ex: Dr. Ernst Fischer collection, Germany, circa 1980's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000. Published: Suddeutschen Zeitung, Jan. 2010. (Note: Additional documentation is included to the purchaser, including a TL authenticity lab test from Kotalla Lab, Germany, June 1991, no. 1391607, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1224341
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This lustrous piece is a Greek black-glazed oinochoe that dates circa early 4th century B.C., and is approximately 5.8 inches high. This scarce to rare piece is intact, has no restoration/repair, and is superb to mint quality condition. This piece has a long neck, a trefoil beaked spout, a cylindrical strap handle, and a sharp carination at the juncture of the cylindrical body and the long neck. This appealing piece has a lustrous deep black glaze that has a multi-colored iridescent patina. The underside has no glaze, and there are some minute spotty white calcite deposits seen on the outer surface, and some heavy white calcite deposits seen on the inside surfaces of the vessel. This piece is also an imitation of the analogous shaped bronze and silver vessels of the period, and a silver vessel with an analogous shape to the piece offered here was found in Tomb III of the royal tombs at Vergina, Greece. This silver vessel is also illustrated in "The Search for Alexander: An Exhibition, National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C., 1980, no. 158, p. 181. (See attached photo.) This type of vessel was created in precious metals, including gilded bronze, for royalty and high nobility, and painted pottery for daily use. Although apparently created for daily use, this piece is scarce to rare, but there is also the possibility that this piece could have been created solely as a votive piece, which represented a more valuable vessel made from precious metals. An analogous scarce to rare black glazed pottery piece, such as the vessel offered here, was offered in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2001, no. 102. ($2,000.00-$3,000.00 estimates, $3,900.00 realized. See attached photo.) On the extremely rare form and type see: "Shapes and Names of Athenian Vases" by G. Richter and M. Milne, New York, 1935, pp. 18-20, fig. 130. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv.#091613-04. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : European Medieval : Pre AD 1000 item #1339132
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This nice piece is a Viking bronze pendant that dates circa 9th-10th century A.D. This piece is approximately 1.7 inches high, and the round plaque section is approximately 1.2 inches in diameter. This piece was made from two sections, one being the flat round plaque, and the other, is the strap loop that has a single rivet securing it to the main body of the piece. The round plaque has a hammered dotted border, and a hammered Christian Byzantine type cross design that has a round center. This round center may also double as a solar symbol, and the cross design also has an additional smaller cross patterns seen at the end of all four points. The design of this Christian cross, seen on this pendant, may also be one of the earliest Christian cross examples seen on a Viking culture type piece. The cross design also has remains of a light green to cream colored enamel, and this shows well against the dark green patina that this piece has. This piece is an complete exceptional example for the type, and is not often seen on the market in this superb condition. This piece is solid, and can easily be worn today. This piece also hangs on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private Denmark collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: