Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Byzantine : Pre AD 1000 item #1397608
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This beautiful ring is a Late Roman/Byzantine bronze ring with gold gilt that dates circa 6th-7th century B.C. This attractive piece is approximately ring size 4.75, and has an approximate .7 inches inner diameter. This intact ring was likely worn by a young girl, and has very attractive features; including remnants of gold gilt seen over the bronze in various sections of the piece, a brilliant pyramid cut deep red garnet, and a round gray/white glass paste inlay. The brilliant pyramid cut red garnet also seems to glow when seen with bright outdoor light, and this type of cut for this stone is scarce for the period, as most ring stones seen during this period have a polished oval type face, rather than a polished pyramid type face. The bezel also has a fine herringbone design that was engraved on each side, and there also is a minute tang at the bottom of the solid bronze ring hoop. The top inside of the bezel is also very smooth, and this is an indication that this ring was worn a number of years. A very pleasing ring with a great deal of eye appeal, and is solid enough that it can be worn today. A custom ring box is included, as well as a small hard case display box. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1404824
Apolonia Ancient Art
$12,875.00
This extremely rare Greek bronze dates to the Geometric Period, circa late 8th-7th century B.C., and is approximately 3.9 inches high. This piece is a votive bronze warrior, and was likely offered to a shrine such as Dodona or Delphi. In addition, this type is known as a "ithyphallic type" figurine, as this figurine displays a large phallus, and is a symbol of strength and fertility, along with the cult of Dionysus. This piece also has a bent lower right leg, and was intentionally bent so that the spirit of the warrior would not spiritually leave the shrine. This piece also has a single belt seen around the waist, has incised facial details, and outstretched stubby arms. The head also has an angular jaw and large almond eyes that are artistic hallmarks of the Greek "Geometric Period". This piece has a beautiful light blue patina with dark brown/green highlights, and is intact with no repair and/or restoration. This piece is also very analogous, and nearly identical to an example found at the Greek sacred shrine of Dodona, and is now on display at the Archaeological Museum of Ioannina, Greece, no. 4905. (For a view of this piece, see the attached photo from the Archaeological Museum of Ioannina, and at Wikimedia: https://commons.wikimedia.org). The piece offered here is about the same size as the piece noted above, and both pieces were cast as a single piece. The piece noted above also has three belt rings seen around the waist, and the piece offered here has a single belt ring. This belt ring may also signify the rank of the warrior, and these warriors are completely nude save for these waist belt rings. There is also a strong possibility that the Museum of Ioannina piece noted above, and the piece offered here, were both made at the same workshop. This piece is also analogous to a larger Greek Bronze Warrior that was offered in Christie's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2014, no. 7 ($40,000.00-$60,000.00 estimates, $43,750.00 realized. See attached photo.) The extremely rare piece offered here is seldom seen on the market, as there are only a handful of recorded examples, and the majority of bronze figurines of this design are Italic in origin and date circa 625-600 B.C. This piece also hangs on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: M. Waltz collection, Germany, circa 1960's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser including US Customs Entry documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1412127
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This exceptional piece is a black basalt stone bust that depicts the Aztec goddess Mayahuel, and dates to the 14th century A.D. This carved bust is approximately 12.75 inches high, by 11.5 inches wide, by 5.8 inches deep from the back of the piece to the nose at the front, and was carved from a heavy and tight grained black basalt stone. This striking piece likely depicts Mayahuel, the Aztec goddess of the maguey plant and fertility. The Aztecs used the maguey plant to produce the fermented drink "pulque", which was served to nobles and warriors at Aztec religious festivals and celebrations. The detailed bust offered here shows the young goddess wearing triangular shaped earrings, and a crown of angular shaped maguey plant leaves. Her mouth is also seen open, and appears to have some of the maguey plant within. This piece also has a flat back, and the rounded face is carved in relief which was meant to be seen with a frontal view. There is also some remains of a cream colored stucco seen on the lower half of this piece, and on the flat back side. This piece was also likely completely covered with a vibrant cream and blue stucco. This piece was designed with an extended pinon at the bottom, and was also designed to be seen as a free standing type piece. This powerful piece was also likely inserted into a religious shrine or temple, and in addition, this piece may have been moved from place to place. This piece is intact, save for two chips at the base of the pinon, and this type of piece is a rare example, given the superb condition and that it is complete. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, and can easily be seen from a distance. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1960's. Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1970's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1239527
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This rare piece is a Salinar/Viru culture monkey "transformation" type vessel that dates circa 400-200 B.C. This piece is approximately 9 inches long by 7 inches high, and is in superb condition with no repair/restoration. This piece is a standing quadruped with a stylized lobed monkey's head, and a short tail is seen curled at the back. This piece is seen standing on sturdy legs, with each flank painted with mythical creatures that have bared fangs and claws. The whole piece is covered with a light yellow-brown slip, and the mythical creatures and facial elements are painted in a light reddish-orange color. This piece is also a "stirrup-handle" type piece that is also designed as a "whistle" type vessel, as it makes a shrill sound when one blows into the raised end of the handle, and as such, this vessel was also likely a "ceremonial" type vessel. In addition, this piece also represents a "transformation" type vessel, as the stylized lobed head on the monkey has human and animal features. This rare early Andean culture ceramic may also be a prototype for the subsequent Moche I ceramics, and as such, this type of piece set the standard for Andean ceramics that have a great deal of realism regarding both human and animal representations. This intact piece has no restoration/repair, some spotty light brown mineral deposits, and is a superb to mint quality example for the type that is seldom seen on the market. Another analogous example of this culture is seen in Lempertz Pre-Columbian Art, Brussels, Jan. 2010, no. 49. (See attached photo. The Lempertz example also has an analogous painted mythical creature on the flanks as the piece offered here, and both of these pieces may have been produced in the same workshop.) This type of piece is x-rare to rare, and has a high degree of eye appeal. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection, Germany, circa 1980's. Ex: Auktion Ketterer 163, 1986. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available for the purchaser, including a TL test from Gutachten Lab., 01/14/1991, no. 369012, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1363783
Apolonia Ancient Art
$365.00
This superb Greek bronze coin is an (AE 17) that is from the city of Mesembria, and dates circa 4th-3rd century B.C. This coin is approximately 17mm in diameter, weighs 5.8 grams, and is in superb condition (EF+/EF+). This coin also has a beautiful dark green patina, perfect centering, excellent metal, and high relief. The obverse (Obv.) of this coin has an excellent image of a Greek "Attic type" helmet, which was the favorite helmet type of elite cavalry units forged by Alexander the Great. This coin also has perfect centering, and the full crest of the helmet is seen on the flan, which is not often completely seen relative to this coin type. The reverse (Rev.) features an Celtic war shield, and has Greek lettering above and below, which also names the city Mesembria. This lettering is also complete, as this coin has perfect centering, and is not often seen on this coin type. The city of Mesembria was a Greek colony in Thrace on the Black Sea coast, and traded in slaves, and agricultural products. This coin is an exceptional example, is one of the better recorded examples with perfect centering, and has details not often seen both on the obverse and reverse. References: SNG BM 276. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this coin is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1290668
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This attractive coin is a Greek EL (electron) hekte that was minted in Kyzikos, circa 550-500 B.C. This scarce piece shows the winged helmeted head of Perseus on the obverse, with a tunny fish behind; and the reverse is a quadripartite incuse square punch. This piece is superb quality (EF+/EF+), is approximately 12mm, 2.69gms, is well centered for the type, and has a lustrous high relief sharp portrait of the mythical figure Perseus. The portrait is also seen in the "Greek Archaic" artistic style, and is seen with a large almond eye, a large nose and chin, and a slight smile. "Greek Archaic" portraiture is also a very desirable feature highly valued by collectors of ancient Greek coins, and the portrait seen here is a fine example. There is also an unobtrusive test mark behind the bust, and is very difficult to see, and does not detract from the detailed and high relief portrait of Perseus. Kyzikos was located on the southwest shore of the Propontis in ancient Mysia next to the river Aisepos. The city's prosperity was due principally to its two fine harbors, which made it a convenient stopping point for merchant ships trading between the Aegean and Black Seas, and the coin seen here likely was made to facilitate port and shipping fees. Kyzikos principle export was the tunny fish, which is often seen on the obverse of it's coinage. The prevalence of winged beings seen on Kyzikene coinage is a reflection of an archaic mythical convention of art, that assigned wings to most divine or sacred entities as a symbol of their nature, and in the case of the gods, of their power to move across great distances. On the coin offered here, we see Perseus, who was the son of Zeus and the mortal Danae, who was the daughter of the king of Argos; and as Perseus had divine status, he was widely worshiped and admired among the ancient Greeks. On the exceptional coin offered here, he is depicted as a divine entity wearing a winged helmet, which is the so-called "Helm of Hades", which rendered its owner invisible to other supernatural entities and mortals. This winged helmet was given to him by Athena, in order to help him evade the gorgons Sthenno and Euryale after he had slain and decapitated their sister Medusa. The coin offered here is scarce to rare on the market, and is a rare depiction of Perseus. Von Fritze no. 65. SNG von Aulock no. 1186. Ex: Harlan Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1262216
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This extremely rare piece is a complete Greek bronze mitra piece that dates to the Geometric Period, circa 8th-7th century B.C. This piece is approximately 5.1 inches high by 7.25 inches wide, is intact with no repair/restoration, and is complete save for a small missing tip of one side. This piece was designed to be suspended from a belt, and likely hung below the rim of a bronze bell corselet. The shape of this piece also suggests that it protected the stomach and lower abdomen, and perhaps each side of the hips as well, with more than one piece attached to a leather belt. There are two holes seen at each end of the central stem which likely held rings that attached to the leather belt. This method of attachment allowed this piece to freely move at the bottom, and allowed the warrior ease of movement as this piece was able to move with the body. According to Herbert Hoffmann in "Early Cretan Armorers", Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1972, pp. 9-10: "The Cretan mitra was designed to be suspended from a belt and to hang below the rim of the bell corselet. The total absence from the find of anything that might be identified as part of a metal belt suggests that the mitrai were worn from a belt of perishable material. Most examples are semicircular sheets of bronze 5 to 7.5mm thick, varying in height from 12.5 to 18 cms. and in breadth from 21.5 to 29.5 cms. The edges of their wide flat rims are sometimes rolled over a bronze wire, the straight upper edge being rolled outward and the edge of the crescent inward. Three holes are punched in the sheet metal near the top edge, one at the center and one at each end, to accommodate rings from which the mitra was suspended. The function of these bronze plates as stomach protectors was recognized by Furtwangler when he published the first examples discovered at Olympia. F. Poulsen gave them the Homeric name 'mitra' in his publication of the specimen from Rethymnon, and the term has had archaeological respectability ever since (although what sort of body armor Homer meant is highly debatable). In endeavoring to define the role played by mitrai in Greek combat we must take into account their geographical distribution. This form of armor is to date documented only from Crete, Thrace, and Etruria - three regions of the ancient world noted for their archers. It seems likely that mitrai were meant to protect their wearers against arrows, i.e. that they were worn by hoplites frequently exposed to archery attack." (An example published by Hoffmann in the reference noted above, pl. 40, no. 3, is slightly larger than the example offered here, has three suspension rings, and has a half crescent shape. See attached photo.) The piece offered here has a slightly different design than the known examples published by Hoffmann in the reference noted above, and the design of this piece may point to Cyprus, and if this is the case, the piece offered here may be one of the earliest examples of it's type, and pre-dates the published Hoffmann examples that date circa mid to late 7th century B.C. The inside of the exceptional piece offered here also likely had a leather liner, and/or had a thick leather pad which attached to the additional perimeter holes seen on this piece. This piece also has fine workmanship, as there are raised punched round knobs that are seen running around the perimeter of the piece. These knobs, besides being very decorative, also add strength to the overall piece. This piece has a beautiful light green patina with some heavy dark green and blue mineralization, along with some white calcite deposits, and the patina and mineral deposits are also heavier on the backside of this piece. Greek armor from this early period is extremely rare, and even fragments from this period are seldom seen on the market. This piece is attached to a custom stand and can easily be removed. Ex: M. Waltz collection, Germany, circa 1970's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1329657
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This Greek gold pendant dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 4th-3rd century B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 1 inch high, by .65 inches wide, by .26 inches thick, and weighs 3.9 gms. This piece was made of solid sheet gold, and was hammered and folded over molds which formed a pendant that has three tubular compartments. Each of these three compartments contained a blue/purple glass paste inlay that extended past each of the open ends of each tubular compartment. The ancient Greeks, and especially the ancient Egyptians, incorporated the color "blue" into talisman pendants and rings in order to ward off evil and bring good luck. The pendant offered here may have been a talisman pendant of this type, as this piece has an attractive blue/purple glass paste inlay. The top and bottom compartments still retain the original glass paste inlay, while the middle compartment has this missing. There is also a raised decorative cable border seen at each tubular end, and this cable border added extra strength to the open ends of each compartment. There is also an applied hoop seen at one end, and this pendant was likely suspended from a gold chain, and may also have been an element in a large necklace. This piece is complete, save for the missing glass paste inlay in the middle tubular section, and the remaining glass paste inlay is very solid. There are some minute dents and stress cracks which are not very noticeable, and overall, this piece is a solid example that can easily be worn today. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1370580
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This scarce Chavin ceramic is a gray-ware bottle that dates to the Middle Chavin Period, circa 1000-700 B.C., and is approximately 8 inches high by 4.8 inches in diameter. This piece is also among the earliest ceramics that were produced by any Andean culture. This exceptional piece also has a finely polished and raised design on each side of the vessel which is a mirror image of one another, and this design is likely a stylized avian such as the raptorial "harpy eagle". One can see the stylized oval incised eye at the bottom of the design, and the two rising "four banded" sectional wings and/or head tufts that rise above into the central body of the vessel. The balance of the main body of the vessel is covered with incised "surface punctations" that were produced by rolling a shell mold over the wet clay. This provided a background for the main design and further enhances the design for the viewer. The graceful raised neck of this interesting piece is also glazed, as well as the flat bottom of the vessel. The raised and incised finely polished design of the stylized raptor, also has design elements that are analogous to some of the elements seen on the so-called "Tello Obelisk", seen at Chavin de Huantar, Peru. There are also theories that the supernatural avian, seen on the piece offered here, was an attendant and/or messenger of a celestial deity, rather than dieties themselves. (See "Chavin and the Origins of Andean Civilization", by Richard Burger, Thames and Hudson, 1995.) The superb piece offered here is also intact, with no apparent repair/restoration, and is an excellent representation for the type. This piece also has some minute root marking, and some minute spotty black mineral deposits. There are also two minute holes for the TL authenticity samples taken from the inside of the upper lip, and the other is on the flat base of the vessel. Ex: Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1970's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL authenticity test from Kotalla Lab, Germany, No. 38R270317, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1234584
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This extremely rare piece is a Moche "open topped" jar that dates, Moche V Period, circa 500-700 A.D. This piece is approximately 5.6 inches high, by 5.25 inches wide at the base. This interesting piece is a polychrome black-ware vessel, and has a nice glossy black glazed surface with some attractive dark brown burnishing. This type of Moche "portrait vessel", is generally seen within the Moche V Period, and is often associated with "open topped" vessels with an extended neck, as is seen with this vessel. The extremely rare piece offered here is intact, has some spotty mineralization, and some attractive minute root marking. This piece shows a man with a facial deformity, as the face is seen caved in with a diminutive nose and an extended lower jaw. The man is also seen looking straight ahead with what appears to be a forlorn facial expression. This piece was collected circa 1960's by Dr. Ernst J. Fisher, who collected Moche art/ceramics that were medical related, and often depicted individuals with diseases and/or deformities. The Moche were known for their realistic ceramic portraiture of individuals, and the vessel seen here is a prime example of their skill for realism in portraiture, and it is likely that this piece depicted an actual individual. The most common view of the deformed face of the individual depicted here, is that this deformity was the result of a disease such as Mucocutaneous Leishmaniasis (ML), and this disease is found today in Bolivia, Brazil, and Peru. ML is contracted from a sand fly bite, and subsequently, ML symptoms include painful nodules inside the nose, perforation of the nasal septum, and enlargement of the nose and lips. Untreated, the disease leads to ulcerated lesions and scarring and tissue destruction predominately in the face and extremities which can be disfiguring (See MedicineNet.com for more information regarding this disease.) This piece likely displays the disease noted above, as the final stage of this disease is a collapse of the nasal septum followed by death. This piece may also have been a votive type piece, as this disease was regarded by the Moche as a sacred sign of the Gods, and consequently, this type of "portrait vessel" is extremely rare. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is included for the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1375798
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This vibrant piece is a Greek Apulian "Red-Figure" lidded mug that dates circa 340-320 B.C., and is approximately 8.2 inches high with the lid, by 4.6 inches in diameter. This mint quality vessel is attributed to the "Darius-Underworld" workshop, and is also attributed as being by the "Stoke-on-Trent" painter who is thought to have worked in this workshop. The "Darius-Underworld" workshop produced several of the best painters for the period, and they all had their own distinctive attributes that are seen in their compositions. This mint quality piece has no repair/restoration, and in addition, has very vibrant black, white, yellow, and dark orange colors. This piece has a rounded knobbed handle seen in the top center of the lid, and there is a single female bust, along with a detailed floral and acanthus pattern. There is also a large female bust seen on the main body of the vessel facing left, along with floral patterns, and a large acanthus pattern below the single "double-ribbed" handle. This goddess is also seen wearing a detailed white and yellow sakkos in her hair that is highlighted with a "dotted and cross" pattern, an elaborate earring, and a dainty white dotted necklace. Her facial features are very pleasing, and she also seems to exude serene eternal youth. This portrait type is commonly known as the "Lady-of-Fashion", and is thought by many academics to represent Demeter and/or Persephone. The Greek myth of Persephone's abduction and return from the underworld gave rise to the belief that the restoration of the goddess to the upper world promised the faithful their own resurrection from death. The piece offered here is a much better example than what is usually seen on the market, due to it's mint quality condition, vibrant colors, and superb artistic style. This piece also has some minute spotty black mineral deposits, and has a nice dark even black glaze. An analogous vessel of this type was offered in Christie's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2011, no. 138. ($3,000.00-$5,000.00 estimates, $5,250.00 realized.) Another analogous example was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, Sept. 2010, in "One Thousand Years of Ancient Greek Vases II, no. 142. ($4500.00 estimate. See attached photo.) The mint quality piece offered here also has superb artistic style, and is not often seen on examples of this type. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Private Illinois collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1259952
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This scarce coin is a silver tetradrachm that was minted in the name of Alexander the Great, circa 311-305 B.C. This coin is approximately 26 mm in diameter, weighs 17.1 grams, is perfectly centered, and is in about extremely fine/extremely fine condition: EF-/EF. This piece also has attractive old cabinet toning, and has an even light gray patina. The obverse has the head of Herakles facing right, wearing a lion's skin headdress, and the obverse is seen in extremely high relief. The obverse has superb artistic style, and the eye of Herakles is seen wide open and is slightly upturned. This is a Greek Hellenistic convention of art that also is meant to portray a deified god, and the portrait seen here may also represent Alexander the Great in the guise of Herakles. The reverse has a seated Zeus facing left, holding an eagle in his extended right arm, with the name of "Alexander" seen behind, and "King" below in Greek lettering. In addition, there is a monogram seen below the throne that is seen within a victory wreath, and the letters "MI" are seen before the throne with a symbol seen below. This symbol represents a type of scythe known as a "grape picker", and this weapon was used on a long pole in order to attack cavalry by slashing and pulling down the rider from his horse. This type of weapon was especially effective against heavy armored riders, who removed from their mounts, could then easily be dispatched by an infantryman. This symbol is extremely rare, with only one recorded example by Martin Price in "The Coinage in the Name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus", The British Museum, 1991. Price also classified this coin as being from the "MI" series, Babylon Mint, circa 311-305 B.C., nos. 3745-3775. The coin offered here is analogous to no. 3768, which is listed as having a "sickle" symbol. This symbol is extremely rare relative to ancient Greek numismatics, and the coin offered here, and the Price example may be the only two recorded examples. In addition, Nancy Waggoner in "The Alexander Mint at Babylon", Columbia University, 1968, thought that the "MI" series, denoted by the "MI" letters seen on the reverse, was a result in a change in the mint personnel at Babylon with the resumption of power there by Seleucus I, circa 311 B.C. Seleucus I gained power in Babylon by wrestling control of Babylon from Antigonos I Monophthalmos, and finally defeating him at the battle of Ipsos circa 301 B.C. The coin offered here may in fact be the first coin issue minted by Seleucus I, and it is interesting to note that the symbols seen on the "MI" series are military in nature, and some of these symbols include a "double-ax", a "ship's prow", and a "spearhead". The "MI" letters are also seen on several subsequent regal coin issues of Seleucus I after circa 305 B.C. The coin offered here is an Alexander the Great type that is seldom seen on the market with the symbols attributed to Seleucus I, and was an issue that helped to secure Seleucus I as "King of Asia". Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1178207
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This piece is a Moche ceramic stirrup-jar that dates circa 450-600 A.D., Moche IV-V periods. This interesting piece is approximately 9.75 inches high, and is intact with no repair/restoration. This piece has some minute black spotty mineral deposits, and has some light brown burnishing. This piece has light orange/red highlights over a cream colored background, and is a very detailed Moche fineline ceramic. This lively piece shows two detailed and animated "Strombus Monsters", which are seen facing right and are seen on each side of the vessel. These composite creatures are seen wearing a conch shell, from which they are seen emerging, and they display a lively open mouthed pose. These creatures have a striped pelage, a tapering tail, a long-spined main that runs down the length of it's back, and four legs with claws. There are also three eyes that extend from the front of the head. According to Christopher Donnan in "Moche Art of Peru", University of California, Los Angeles, CA., 1978, p.63: "On the snout of the monster are antenna-like objects clearly derived from the land snail. There is a likely explanation for the combination of features on this animal. Since conch shells (Strombus galeatus) were imported from Ecuador, the Moche people probably never saw the creature living inside. They may, however, have made an analogy between the creature they thought inhabited the conch shell and the land snail, which is native to the north coast of Peru." There is an analogous comparable to this vessel that is seen in Sotheby's New York, Arts of Africa, Oceania & the Americas, May 2003, no. 207. ($4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Dr. Klaus Maria collection, circa 1978-2012. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL document from Gutachten Lab., no. 7579125, dated 11/19/1979, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1226221
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This Thasos silver tetradrachm coin is mint state (FDC) to superb quality grade (EF+/EF+), and dates circa 2nd-1st century B.C. This superb graded piece is approximately 34 mm wide, and weighs 17.1 gms. This attractive piece is well centered and shows on the obverse (Obv.) a young bust of Dionysus, wreathed with grape leaves and bunches. The reverse (Rev.) shows a very muscular nude standing Herakles, holding a club in his right hand, and over his left arm, a cloak made from the skin of the Nemean lion. The impressive standing nude Herakles, is also more defined and muscular than what is normally seen, and this coin is a better example than most of the other examples that have been on the market. The (Rev.) also shows a legend in Greek lettering seen on each side of Herakles and below. The lettering to the right reads "HERAKLES"; and below reads "THASOS", which refers to the island of Thasos where this coin was likely minted. This coin type is also classified as a Celtic imitation of the Thasos types, and this is likely the case for this coin type, but it may be that the majority of these coins were minted by Thasos for trade with the Thracian interior. The pieces with better artistic style are generally recognized as being from the Thasos mint, as the piece offered here, and the piece offered here has great artistic style for the period. Thasos is a Greek island in the northern Aegean Sea off the coast of Thrace, and was colonized by the Phoenicians for its gold mines. The Phoenicians also established a religious cult on the island to their god Melkart, who later came to be identified with the Greek god Herakles when the island was Hellenized circa 650 B.C. The depiction of the Thracian wine god Dionysus was also adopted on the subsequent Thracian coinage as well. In 197 B.C., the Romans defeated Philip V of Macedon at the battle of Cynoscephalae, and thus made Thasos a "free" city state. Pliny the Elder was later to describe Thasos as still being a "free" city state in the 1st century A.D. This coin is better than most examples, regarding the artistic style and the impressive muscular Herakles seen on the reverse, and has traces of mint luster. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1989. References: Sear 1759. BMC 74 (var.). SNG Copenhagen 1046 (var.). I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1323161
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This exceptional piece is an early Greek Athenian silver tetradrachm that dates circa 500-490 B.C., and is classified in "Group L" by Seltman. This coin is approximately 25mm wide, weighs 16.61 gms, and is in mint state condition (FDC/FDC). This coin has a very light gray patina with some minute spotty dark black deposits, and has a beautiful natural "as found" patina. This exceptional coin has the helmeted head of Athena facing right seen on the obverse, and the reverse has a facing standing owl, with an olive sprig behind, and the Greek lettering (A-TH-E) before. The standing owl was also the "civic badge" of Athens, and was widely recognized in the ancient Greek world. This coin also has perfect centering, in addition to, extremely high relief which are factors that make this coin one of the top examples that have been seen on the market. This coin was also likely minted shortly before the battle of Marathon, circa 490 B.C., and was likely used to help expand the Athenian forces that opposed the invading Persian military juggernaut. The helmeted Athena is also a masterpiece of Greek Archaic art, with the slightly smiling face of Athena and the large almond-shaped eyes which are hallmarks of the Archaic Period. The bust of Athena also has a sculptural quality and design that is not often seen on prior or subsequent Athenian issues. This piece also displays a full crest and neckline that is not often seen as well, as this piece has perfect centering and was minted on a large and full flan. Overall, this coin is one of the finest specimens known for the type due to the reasons noted above, along with the fact that this piece has exceptional artistic style which also contributes to this coin's beauty and eye appeal. References: Svoronos, Pl. 6, No. 11. and Seltman, Pl. XV, A214/P275. Ex: Private German collection circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1378394
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This scarce piece is an Egyptian faience two-faced amulet bust that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.25 inches high, and is an intact example. This piece was originally made as a figurine of the Egyptian god Pataikos, and has an attractive light green glaze. This interesting piece has nearly two identical "mold-made" faces seen on each side of the bust in a "Janus" type design. This appealing Egyptian bust also shows the two faces sharing the same bald head, and these faces have deeply molded features that convey a slight smile and serene expression. This piece was likely made as a "protector" type work of art, and may also have doubled as the god Bes and Pataikos, thus having additional protective powers. The Egyptian god Pataikos was derived from a Phoenician "dwarf-form", and was a "protector" type god which is also sometimes referred to as a "Ptah-Seker" god. Pataikos was also a popular god in ancient Egypt, and was always present among the workers in precious-metal workshops in Old Kingdom scenes of daily life. The piece seen here was also likely to have been intentionally and ceremoniously broken in antiquity, which subsequently killed the magic of the piece. This scarce piece is in superb condition, has a nice colored glaze, and is a large example for the type. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1388636
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This detailed and esoteric piece is a Greek terracotta of a Kore, and dates to the 6th-5th century B.C. This piece is approximately 3 inches high, and is mounted on a custom steel and Plexiglas display stand. On the stand it is approximately 5 inches high. This piece was mold made, as it has a flat backside, and is a light orange terracotta. This piece depicts a Greek Kore, whose name means "maiden", and this goddess was responsible for good fortune and the change of the seasons with the "rebirth" of spring, and she was also known as "Persephone". Kore was also a fertility goddess, and is seen here holding her breasts. The face also has a slight smile, almond eyes, and a square chin which are also artistic style hallmarks for the period. This piece also has incised detailing that defines the hands, eyes, and hair locks. The face has a very esoteric look, and this piece has superb artistic style for the period. Ex: Munzen and Medaillen AG, Basel, Switzerland, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1374529
Apolonia Ancient Art
$925.00
This mint quality Roman glass flask dates circa 2nd century A.D., and is approximately 7.6 inches high. This flawless light green glass piece has no breaks or chips, and is a larger example than what is normally seen. This well designed piece also has a large folded rim at the top that provided greater control while pouring a liquid, and in addition, there is also an indented bottom design that allowed this piece to solidly stand upright. This piece also has an indented section at the bottom of the elongated neck, and this also controlled the flow of liquid within the vessel. This piece has a brilliant multi-iridescent patina with light blue highlights, seen in sections of the vessel, along with some light brown earthen deposits and minute root marking. Overall, an attractive piece with nice eye appeal that has interesting design features. (For the type see, John Hayes, "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Onterio Museum", 1975, no. 231.) Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: