Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1384943
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This rare Egyptian faience amulet is a facing panther head that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.2 inches high, by 1.2 inches wide from ear to ear, by .4 inches thick, and is an intact example with no repair and/or restoration. This intact piece is also a complete example, and is in superb condition, save for some minute stress cracks on the front face, and a small area of glass loss on the lower left back side. This piece has a light green glaze, a flat back, and has a molded and detailed panther head on the front side. A hole runs through the center from top to bottom, and there are two additional mounting holes seen on each side of the center hole at the top of the piece. (The piece offered here is very analogous in artistic style to the carved facing panther head seen on the basalt statue of Anen, who served as an astronomer priest under Amenhotep III, and is now seen in the Turin Egyptian Museum, Italy. See attached photos.) The panther head is a regal symbol, and attached with the panther skin robe with stars, together represented the attributes of an astronomer. Egyptian regal princes were trained in astronomy so that they could predict the rising and falling of the Nile. The piece offered here likely was part of a regal necklace, is one of the rarest Egyptian amulet types, and is not often seen on the market. This piece also hangs on a custom display stand that is included. Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #924673
Apolonia Ancient Art
$385.00
This Sassanian seal has an image of an animal, possibly a wolf or a fox. The carved image is seen on the flat side of the piece, and this piece dates circa 4th-5th century A.D. The carving is done by the creation of deep lines which accent the limbs and head of the animal. This piece is made of a hard black steatite, which is very difficult to carve, and consequently, there are few Sassanian seals that are made from this material. This piece is approximately .6 inches high, and has six carved round decorative circles that are carved in high relief. These circles are a hallmark of fine Sassanian artistic style, and this type of carving is seen on carved Sassanian glass beakers. (For the type see "Masterpieces of Glass in The British Museum", by D.B. Harden, London, 1968, no.137.) There is also a bow-drilled hole that is seen at the center of the piece, and this piece was probably part of a necklace. There are some dark brown deposits seen in various sections of the piece, and there are some minute stress cracks which are an excellent mark of authenticity. This type of seal is scarce, as the material is made of a hard black steatite and the degree of workmanship is very high. This piece is from modern day Iran and the black steatite stone is native to this region. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Byzantine : Pre AD 1000 item #1246608
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This superb bronze ring is late Roman/Byzantine type, circa 4th-5th century A.D., and is approximately ring size 8.5, and is .3 inches wide at the flat face. This piece is solid bronze, and is in superb condition, with only some minute smooth wear on the inner surface. The outer surfaces have great detail, with decorative floral line design on each side of the ring leading up to the flat, square central face. The central face has a Byzantine type cross seen within a "four dotted circular pattern" design. The Byzantine cross appears to be hidden within this "four dotted circular pattern" design, and perhaps this was the intention of the ring maker, as during the period that this ring was made, the so-called Christian cult was becoming more widespread within the Roman Empire. This ring was likely made for a young man or woman, and has a perfectly round diameter. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina, with some light brown mineral deposits seen mostly on the inner surface and the low relief sections of the outer surface. The low relief sections of the outer surface also define the designs seen on this ring. Several rings of this type can be seen in "Die Welt Von Byzanz", by H. Wamser, Theiss Pub., 2004, nos. 667-674. (See attached photo.) A small ring stand also comes with this piece, and this ring can easily be worn today. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1373047
Apolonia Ancient Art
$725.00
This scarce Roman bronze lamp dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and is approximately 2.5 inches long, by 1.1 inches high. This piece is complete, has no breaks and/or chips, and is in mint "as found" condition. This piece has two openings, one in the top center for filling oil, and the other at the end of the vessel that would hold the wick. The other end of the vessel has an attachment hoop for a chain, or a cord, and could have been hung as a votive offering pendant. This piece also has a flat bottom and easily stands by itself. This piece not only was likely made as a votive offering, but it was also likely functional as well. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina with dark red highlights, and has some heavy dark brown mineral deposits on the inside of the vessel. This piece comes with a custom Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1333281
Apolonia Ancient Art
$18,500.00
These seven extremely rare Graeco-Thracian silver phalerae date to the Hellenistic Period, circa 2nd-1st century B.C., and are approximately 4.3 inches in diameter for the larger phalera, and 2.25 inches in diameter for the other six phalerae. All seven phalerae are hand beaten from silver, and all have various degrees of gold gilt over the front surfaces. The largest phalera resembles a small bowl, and was hand beaten over a mold which formed the design seen in the center of the piece. This central design element resembles a "swastika", and perhaps this is the symbol this piece was meant to portray, but more likely, this symbol may also be a depiction of a "pinwheel" that spun in the wind. This "pinwheel" has a central dot or pin that supports the "four flaring bands" that are seen attached at the center. This "pinwheel" symbol was known to the ancient Greeks as a "strovilos" symbol, meaning "whirlwind", and is also a prominent symbol seen primarily on ancient bronze coins, and extremely rare silver coins that date circa 185-168 B.C. These coins are attributed to the Macedonian rulers Philip V and Perseus, and depict a Macedonian shield on the obverse with the "pinwheel" symbol seen at the center. (For the coin types see "SNG Ashmolean Museum Oxford, Vol. V, Part III, Macedonia", 1976, Nos. 3282-3288. Nos. 3282-3283 depict the "four flaring band" symbol, and nos. 3284-3288 depict the "six flaring band" symbol. See attached photo.) The silver phalerae offered here may have attached to a shield as portrayed in the coins noted above, or may have been attached to a leather type cuirass. The six nearly identical smaller phalerae would suggest this, as they all have two attachment pins that are flattened on the front and back sides. The clearance for these attachment pins on the backside suggests that these pieces were attached to a leather liner for a cuirass, rather than inserted into a shield that perhaps had a wooden core, but it is also quite possible that that these six phalerae were attached to a thin bronze cover of a shield that had a wooden core. The larger phalera with the "pinwheel" symbol has four attachment holes, two seen at the top and bottom, and this would allow for easy attachment to a shield with a wooden core. This piece may have also served as the central roundel of a chest cuirass as well. Whatever the case, these extremely rare pieces definitely had a military application, and are seldom seen on the market, as these pieces were made for a wealthy warrior of high status. The smaller phalerae support this theory, as they are very detailed and were hand beaten into shape. They are also individually detailed with multiple minute punch marks that defined the outer sculpted design. Within this outer sculpted design is a symbol at the center that is comprised with what looks to be a "cluster" of animal heads facing outwards. Each one of the heads have a snout, eyes, and two ears which are shared with each of the other individual heads. The overall rounded "cluster" design also resembles a flower as seen from above, and this design may have had multiple meanings and representations. The designs seen on all of the phalerae are also extremely rare relative to ancient Greek art, and may have been a unique symbol that perhaps distinguished the warrior who wore these phalerae. All of these pieces have dark brown/black deposits in various degrees seen over the silver and gold gilt, and the silver with little gold gilt and deposits also has a beautiful blue black patina. All of these pieces are intact, with two of the smaller phalerae having some stress cracks, and overall, these pieces are in exceptional condition. For the type see, "Thracian Art Treasures", by Ivan Venedikov and Todor Gerassimov, Caxton Pub., London, 1975, nos. 351-353. These pieces are also attached to a custom Plexiglas display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private Krefield, Germany collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1177714
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This extremely rare piece is a Moche blackware ceramic that dates circa 100 B.C.-200 A.D., Moche 1-II periods. This piece is approximately 6.75 inches high by 5.6 inches wide. This Moche ceramic is an early blackware example, and has a solid black/brown glaze over a light brown terracotta. This piece is in the form of a manta ray, and is seen in an upright position with its wings and tail section acting as support legs. This upright design allows the viewer to see a raised head that has anthropomorphic features, such as an open round eye at each side of the head, an open mouth seen where the gills of the manta ray would have been seen, and nostrils above the mouth. The gills of the manta ray are also seen below the mouth area and between the extended wings that form a base for the piece. In addition, the gills of the manta ray seem to emphasize the anthropomorphic head just seen above, and this anthropomorphic head is likely depicted morphing into a full human head, or vice-versa, from a human into a manta ray. The anthrpomorphic head seen on this piece is also enlarged, and according to Christopher Donnan in "Moche art of Peru", University of California, Los Angeles, CA., 1978, p.30: "Depiction of humans or anthropomorphized creatures involves a standard enlargement of the hands and heads. Sexual organs may also be enlarged for emphasis, although normally they are small relative to the size of the body, or are simply not indicated." The x-rare piece offered here has attractive and extensive root marking, has some minute spotty black mineral deposits, and is intact with no repair/restoration. Another extremely rare Moche manta ray ceramic type of nearly the same size of the piece offered here is seen in the Larco Museum Collection, Lima, Peru. (See attached photo. The Larco example is not a blackware piece, and has extended wings with a human face seen underneath.) The piece offered here is seldom seen in many old collections, and this is an excellent indicator that this piece is an extremely rare type. Ex: Galerie Arte Andino, Munich, Germany, circa 1980-1986. Ex: Dr. Klaus Maria collection, circa 1986-2012. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL test from Gutachten Lab., no. 638646, dated Dec. 5th, 1986, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1337548
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This impressive piece is a Graeco-Roman Hellenistic silver necklace that dates circa 2nd century B.C.-1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 21 inches in length, and is made from several interwoven strands of silver in an intricate design, resulting in a massive thick chain that is approximately .4 inches in diameter. This intricate silver piece also has two cylindrical terminals that cap each end of the chain, each decorated with looped band enclosures with raised "wire-rope" pattern designs. The "wire-rope" pattern design is also a Greek Hellenistic convention of art that is seen on ancient Greek gold and silver jewelry for the period. The two cylindrical terminals in turn connect to a bronze clasp that securely closes the necklace on the wearer. There is also a central movable pendant that has applied dots and an additional raised "wire-rope" pattern. The central movable pendant may also have framed a carved gem or perhaps an ancient coin. This piece could have only been owned by a wealthy individual in antiquity, as it has an extremely high degree of workmanship and was made from a very valuable material. This piece was also very impressive in antiquity, as it has a very high degree of eye appeal, and as such, was likely worn by a woman who wanted to impress her peers. There is an ancient repair on the right side of the chain, and this may have been broken and repaired due to civil unrest. Another near identical example of this piece is the example offered in Christie's Antiquities, London, Oct. 2006, no. 62. (3,500.00-5,500.00 Pounds estimates.) The Christie's example cited above is also from the same collection as the piece offered here, and in addition, both of these pieces may have been produced in the same workshop. Both of these silver pieces are also analogous to the example seen in "Ancient Gold: The Wealth of the Thracians" by I. Marazov, New York, 1998, p. 117, no. 36. The beautiful piece offered here may also be easily worn today with some minor restoration, and a carved gem or coin can easily be added into the central hoop. This piece is also an exceptional collectable as an ancient piece of jewelry, and is an important collectable as is. This piece also has an attractive dark gray patina, and the bronze hoop also has an attractive dark green patina. This solid piece can also be modified with a modern clasp, and can easily be worn today. A custom display necklace case is also included. Ex: Private German collection, Krefeld, Germany, circa 1970's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1263688
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This attractive piece is a Greek Attic skyphos that dates circa 500-480 B.C. This x-large piece is approximately 4 inches high, by 6.7 inches in diameter at the rim, and is 9.6 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is intact with no cracks and/or chips, and has no repair/restoration. This piece is superb to mint quality "as found" condition, save for some minor glaze loss on one outer section of the vessel. This piece is known as a "black glazed" Attic skyphos, as this piece has a deep black glaze seen on the inner and outer surfaces. This piece has a painted light red band seen on the wide foot base, and an unglazed reserve seen under each handle. This piece has some white calcite deposits seen in the low relief sections and the bottom side of the vessel. This piece also has a beautiful patina with some attractive light red and dark brown burnishing. This piece is a much larger example than what is normally seen, and has very thick handles that curve up and away from the main body of the piece. There is also a black target dot seen at the center of the bottom surface, and this is also a hallmark of an Attic potter. In addition, this piece has a thick rounded lip and a defined shoulder line that runs around the main body of the vessel. The walls of this x-large vessel average about .2 inches in thickness as well, and this piece was created to be a durable vessel. This type of vessel was also produced in Athens for export to many regions of the ancient Greek world. Two scarce identical examples of this piece are seen in the "Classical Art Research Centre and The Beazley Archive", and are of the same size and shape. (See no. 1011658, Museum Czartoryski, Krakow, Poland; and no. 1003165, Thessaloniki Archaeological Museum, Greece.) This piece is a solid complete example, and is not often seen in this intact condition. Ex: Steve Rubinger collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Metalwork : Pre AD 1000 item #1208989
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This interesting piece is a Near Eastern bronze roundel, that dates circa 1000-650 B.C. This rare piece is approximately 2.5 inches in diameter, and it has a concave design. This piece was likely attached to a cloth backing such as a garment, as there are some minute attachment holes seen on the outer flat perimeter band. Its quite possible that this piece could have made up a armored object such as a cuirass, a belt, or a quilted protective garment with several of these attached roundels. The concave design, with a protective inner core of leather or wood, would have offered some added strength. The flat outer perimeter band also has a detailed dotted pattern that runs around the piece, and another larger dotted pattern is seen just inside on the inner concave section of this piece. Centered in the middle of this concave section is a cat-like design which likely represents a lion or lioness, as it has a small upturned tail, paws, and feline ears, nose, and eyes. The stylized design of the head is very interesting, as there is an insect design seen within the head of this animal. This insect resembles a bee or an ant, as seen from the perspective of a top view and looking down. This piece may be from the Luristan, Urartian, or Marlik cultures, as the fabric and artistic style of this piece is analogous to other bronze pieces from those cultures. However, the duality of design is not often seen relative to the cultures noted above, and this piece is rare to extremely rare. This piece likely was used as a "protector type" piece, given the symbols seen on this piece, and this also makes perfect sense as a work of arms. The dark green patina of this piece is exceptional, and there is some attractive spotty light brown and reds seen within this piece. This piece has some minor losses seen on the upper outer edge which does not detract from this attractive piece, and this piece has a great deal of eye appeal. This pieces comes with a custom wooden and clear Plexiglas stand, and simply slips down into the stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1380004
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This attractive piece is an Egyptian bronze torso of Osiris that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C. This piece is approximately 2.9 inches high, by 1.3 wide from shoulder to shoulder, and is the upper torso of a standing or seated Osiris. This Osiris is seen wearing an Atef-crown with a detailed and protective raised cobra seen above the forehead, along with an extended false beard. This figurine is also depicted with a mummified form, with the arms folded tightly over his chest, and is seen grasping the regal crook and flail insignia. The face is also very esoteric, and has very fine artistic style with realistic features. The hollow eyes may also have held an inlay as well. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina with red highlights, and is a near complete upper torso, save for a small section of both of the upper part of the feathered crown attachments. This piece has exceptional detail with esoteric features, and is a better example than what is normally seen in the market. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Pre AD 1000 item #1073003
Apolonia Ancient Art
Apolonia Ancient Art is a full member of the AIAD (Association of International Antiquities Dealers). Apolonia Ancient Art follows the "Code of Conduct", as defined by the AIAD regarding all business transactions. The AIAD is an association of dealers in antiquities (including fine art, coins, metallic and ceramic objects) whose aim is to promote responsible antiquities dealing and to provide a support network and means of exchanging relevant information about fakes, forgeries, fraudulent misrepresentation, and stolen goods with a view to identifying such items offered for sale and notifying the appropriate authorities. The AIAD members "Code of Conduct" can be found at: https://aiad.org.uk.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1384812
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This mint quality and appealing Roman glass flask dates circa late 2nd-3rd century A.D., and is approximately 5.3 inches high. This piece is a light amber colored glass flask with a raised cylindrical neck, which is slightly constricted where it meets the body and flares at the rim. The main body has subtle pinched rims that run around the vessel, and these gave this vessel added strength for holding a heavy liquid. This piece has a brilliant silvery patina seen within the flared lip, and a multi-colored iridescence seen on various sections of the piece. A piece with nice eye appeal. (For the type see: John Hayes, "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum", 1975, no. 157.) Ex: Rafi Brown collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Superior Galleries: "The International Diamond Corporation Auction", Los Angeles, CA., June 8, 1993. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1401878
Apolonia Ancient Art
$365.00
This scarce piece is a Roman bronze bull's head oil lamp cover that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This attractive piece is approximately 1.25 inches long, by 1.1 inches wide from ear to ear, by .3 inches high. This piece is complete with no repair and/or restoration, and was cast into a mold and was then finished with hammered details. The head of the bull seen here has very detailed eyes, snout, and horns, and is a superb example for the type. This piece also has a very attractive dark brown patina with light green and blue highlights which are also heavier on the inside surface of the piece. This piece likely served as a cover for a bronze oil lamp, and was simply placed over the central filler hole. Roman oil lamp lids of this type are also scarce, as Roman bronze oil lamps usually had lids that were attached to the lamp with a swinging type hinge. There is also no indication that this piece was attached to a hinge as well. Overall, a nice Roman bronze with a high degree of eye appeal. This piece also sits on a custom display stand, and can easily lift off the stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1304124
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This interesting piece is a silver Greco-European "spectacle fibula" that dates to the Geometric Period, circa 8th-7th century B.C. This piece is approximately 2.4 inches long, by 1.4 inches high, and is intact with no repair/restoration. This piece was made from one hammered strand of silver, and was made by creating a wire spiral that begins and ends at the center of each spiral. This piece is also very solid, as the diameter of the silver strand is about 1/16 inch on the average. The area between both spirals forms a clip that likely held rolls of hair in place, so this piece served as a functional, as well as a decorative type of piece. This piece has an attractive light gray patina, along with some minute spotty dark green mineral deposits seen mostly on "Side B" of the piece. (An analogous example was offered in Bonham's Antiquities, London, Oct. 2012, no. 218, 500-600 Pound estimates.) Silver examples of this type are relatively scarce on the market, especially in the intact condition offered here. This piece hangs on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1402763
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This Romano-Egyptian micro-mosaic cut glass tile is a bust of Horus, and dates to the Ptolemaic Period, circa 332-31 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.3 cm high, by 1.1 cm wide, by .02 cm deep, and is a complete example with no repair and/or restoration. This rare and exceptional example depicts Horus, the Egyptian falcon-headed god, and is seen in profile with white cheeks, black feathers, a red spotted eye and beak detail, and a green and white striped chest detail, all set against a cobalt blue background. Glass micro-mosaics, like this piece, were made in long canes which were then cut into sections that all showed the same image. This piece also has some minute black spotty mineral deposits, and is an exceptional example, as it also has vibrant colors and the bust of Horus is seldom seen relative to pieces of this type. This piece is also translucent, especially with the cobalt blue background that frames the image of Horus. (Another example of this type was offered in Christie's Antiquities, "The Groppi Collection", London, April 2012, no. 87. The Groppi example may also be from the same workshop as the piece offered here, as the design of Horus is analogous in terms of design and the use of the colored glass.) Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1970's-1980's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1261031
Apolonia Ancient Art
$625.00
This beautiful coin is a large Athenian silver tetradrachm that dates circa 136-80 B.C. The grade is very fine to superb (VF/EF+), with some metal loss on the obverse, is approximately 15.5 grams, and is approximately 1.4 inches wide. The standing owl seen within the overall design on the reverse is approximately .75 inches high. Both sides are very well centered and the reverse is extremely detailed. This coin is very large and has a wide flan, is slightly larger than most examples, and resembles a medallion. This coin type is known as a "New Style" Athenian tetradrachm, which was minted in ancient Athens, and recalled the grandeur of the earlier golden age of Athens. Athens lost the Peloponnesian War to Sparta circa 404 B.C., was later defeated by Macedonia at Chaeronea circa 338 B.C., and her coinage was severely curtailed until circa 190 B.C., when she was finally able to start minting this coin series which is known as the "New Style" series. This coin type was also known to the ancient Greeks as "stephanephoroi", meaning "wreath bearers". This coin is nearly pure silver and was an international currency from the second century B.C. until the time of Augustus. These new Athenian coins, recalling an older more familiar design with the helmeted Athena's head on the obverse and the standing owl on the reverse, quickly became the dominant coin in the region. While their basic design remained unchanged with the goddess Athena and her owl, the obverse on this coin shows the goddess wearing a very stylized helmet, and the reverse shows a wreath encircling an extremely detailed owl balanced on an amphora. The letters on the reverse: A-OE, represent A-THENS, along with the civic symbol of Athens which is the standing owl. There is also a cornucopia symbol to the right of the amphora, and both of these symbols represented the commercial trading bounty of Athens. This coin would also make a great pendant, as it is large and has a great deal of eye appeal. In addition, this coin has a flat flan which is not concave, and this is also a positive feature for a pendant. Sear no. 2555. BMC 11., no. 503. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1990's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1207767
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,865.00
This scarce Pre-Columbian piece is a Mayan cylinder vessel that dates Late Classic, circa 550-950 A.D. This attractive piece is approximately 7 inches high by 4.9 inches in diameter. This superb to mint quality vessel is a "Molded Orangeware Vessel", El Salvador/Honduras region, that has well-defined mold made impressions seen within two box-shaped fields seen on each side of the vessel. Each box-shaped field has a standing Mayan priest/dignitary holding an elongated rectangular object in his extended right hand, and the other panel shows this rectangular object hanging on the right elbow of this standing individual. This standing Mayan priest/dignitary seen within both panels has his head placed within a raptorial beaked bird, which may represent a sacred "Moan Bird", and this raptorial beaked bird is likely a ceremonial headdress. This individual is also seen wearing royal ear flares and bracelets, has a water-lily emerging from his lips, and is wearing a sashed lioncloth. There is also a stippled woven mat pattern seen in the background, and the overall composition on both panels have very sharp details and is better than most examples. In addition, each panel shows this standing individual in a slightly different position, and this design conveys a slight movement of this individual, as one views this exceptional piece from panel to panel. This convention of art relative to Mayan ceramics, is generally seen on scarce to rare Mayan molded vessels of this type. This intact piece also has some attractive light gray burnishing, some minute root marking, and spotty dotted black mineral deposits. An analogous example is seen in Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, Nov. 24, 1986, no. 127. ($1,500.00-$2,500.00 estimates, $2,750.00 realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1281148
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This pleasing Roman marble is a portrait of a young woman that dates circa 2nd century A.D. This piece is approximately 3.4 inches high by 2.25 inches wide. This piece has a break at the back, at the bottom of the neck, and at the back right side of the head. The flat break at the back is an indication that this piece was once part of a large carved relief, possibly a sarcophagus panel, and was broken away from the main part of the sculpture. This attractive bust is also designed with a three-quarter facing profile, and this is a Greek convention of art that was extensively copied by the Romans circa 1st-2nd century A.D. In addition, the head is leaning to the left, with the neck seen at an angle moving down to the right, and this is an indication that the body of this young girl was portrayed with movement, as seen within the entire scene that this this bust was originally attached to. The face of the young girl appears to be serene, and conveys an eternally young look which may also be an indication that this is also meant to be a portrait of a goddess, possibly Diana (Artemis) or Juno (Hera). The hair seen on this young portrait is also arranged in three layers, which was a Roman hair style that was popular in the 2nd century A.D. The face of this piece is also intact, with no breaks to the nose, chin, and cheeks. The mouth is also rendered in a very sensual way, and has a great deal of eye appeal. This piece is also somewhat analogous to the numerous Roman marble portraits that were produced circa 161-176 A.D. of Faustina II, who was the daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina I, and was later married to Marcus Aurelius in 145 A.D. (See attached photo of a young marble portrait bust of Faustina II, circa 161-176 A.D., and seen in "Art of the Ancient World", Vol. XXI, 2010, no. 26 by Royal Athena Galleries, New York.) The attractive piece offered here has a nice light tan patina, with some spotty dark brown and black mineral deposits, which are also readily seen over the entire piece. Overall, this piece is an attractive Roman marble, and is a choice example. This piece is also mounted on an attractive custom display stand. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Art, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1308509
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This rare piece is a Greco-Roman bronze bust of a bald grotesque figurine that dates to the late Hellenistic Period, circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 1 inch high, and is a superb example with a nice even dark green patina. This piece was likely a bottle stopper and/or may have fitted into a long-necked glass or bronze vessel. The bottom of the stem appears to have been broken, and this piece may have had a longer stem that could have extended down into the vessel. This piece may also have had gold or silver gilt, and may possibly have been a garment or hair pin. Regardless of what this piece could have been, it was certainly made to have been seen, and the bald head and deformed features of this "grotesque bust" is very noticeable. This interesting piece has ears that are lop-sided, with one higher than the other, deep sunken eyes, and a very a very large nose. This portrait may also represent an actual individual that was born with these deformities, and may have been created to represent an actual person rather than a fantasy individual. It is also possible that this deformed person may have been the subject of a play, and may have represented a type of actor. An analogous piece with a near identical portrait, and described as a "Dancing Grotesque of Mine", is seen in "Master Bronzes from the Classical World", by Mittien and Doeringer, Fogg Art Museum Pub., 1968, no. 122. (This published piece has an identical portrait as the piece offered here, and is bald except for a lock at the crown. This near nude figurine is also posed in a vigorous dance, and is a dancer that likely held castanet-like clappers. This piece is also described as having "contorted contours and exaggerated features which embody the Hellenistic love of caricature", and is "allegedly from Alexandria". See attached photo.) The portrait seen on this published piece, and the piece offered here is nearly identical, and both pieces were likely produced in an Alexandrian workshop. The rare piece offered here also sits on the custom display stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1325875
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This complete piece is made of 22 tubular jade beads, along with a jade "Celt-God" pendant, which is also known as an "Ax-God" pendant. The beads strung together are approximately 22 inches long, and the "Celt-God" pendant is approximately 4 inches high by 1 inches wide near the base. This piece dates circa 200-500 A.D., and it was produced in northern Costa Rica, in an area known as the Atlantic Watershed region. The beads and pendant were "bow-drilled", with a hole created from drilling at each end. The beads are also a combination of different types of jade and jade-type stones, with some darker in color than others. The pendant shows "line-cut" design and is likely an anthropomorphic human image. One can see design "line-cut" work that looks like an open mouth and head at the top of the pendant. The back side is flat, and the "line-cut" design is seen on the concave front side. There is also minute mineral deposits and root marking seen on the pendant and most of the beads, and most, if not all of the beads appear to be ancient, and have mineral deposits and patina. These pendants had magical properties, and were worn as personal adornments which also conveyed that status and rank of the owner. The "Celt-God" pendant type was first developed by the Olmec circa 1200-1000 B.C., and this type of object was also votive. This type of object is also found in many pre-Columbian cultures in Mexico and Guatemala. This type of jade object is also explained in detail by Frederick Lange in "Pre-Columbian Jade", University of Utah Press, 1993, p. 278, Fig. 21.9 (b), and this type of celt is classified by Lange as being a "crouching figure" type (See attached photo). This piece can also be worn as is, and can also be displayed in the included custom display box. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1177558
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This interesting Moche ceramic dates circa 300-500 A.D., Moche III-IV periods. This superb piece is approximately 9.25 inches high, and is in intact condition with vibrant colors. This piece has some attractive light brown burnishing on the vessel, and has reddish-brown painted highlights over a cream background. This piece has a conical projection from the top of the vessel, and an attached red stirrup handle is seen on the side. This conical projection may represent a Moche ceremonial club, as it is very analogous in shape to the terminal end of a wooden ceremonial sacrificial club that was found in Tomb 1, Platform II, Huaca de la Luna, Peru. (See "Moche Art and Archaeology in Ancient Peru", National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C., Yale University Press, 2001, pp.96-97, fig.10. Immunological analysis of this wooden club indicated that it had been repeatedly drenched in human blood, and this club could have been used to ceremoniously break crania or other bones of victims. See attached photo. Another Moche stirrup-jar vessel with an analogous conical projection of this type is seen in "Moche Art of Peru" by Christopher Donnan, University of California, Los Angeles, 1978, pp.46-47, fig.65-66. This particuliar fineline vessel has a procession of warriors seen with war clubs, helmets, and small shields.) The piece offered here has a frieze of four red floral/reed groups, which are evenly spaced in the cream colored field that is seen around the main body of the vessel, and there is an avian above each. There is a red "center bar" symbol that divides this frieze into two parts, and in addition, there are two floral symbols seen on each side of the vessel on the upper shoulder. According to Donnan in the reference noted above on p.33: "In two-dimensional representation, plants are consistently shown in profile, with one notable exception: the blossoms on a flowering plant which often occurs in fresh water scenes are shown from above. (fig. 58)". The red "center bar" symbol noted above, was also a Moche convention of art to not only divide the frieze into two parts, but also to give the viewer a two-dimensional plane which offers the viewer of this frieze a view from above, along with a profile view as well. This "duality of portraiture" is seldom seen in Pre-Columbian art, and as such, this piece is a rare example of Moche fineline ceramics. In addition, the red "center bar" symbol also likely represents a "tie symbol", which simply is a rope and/or cloth that is seen tied around the neck of the vessel. According to Elizabeth Benson in "Death-Associated figures on Mochica Pottery", published in "Death and the Afterlife in Pre-Columbian Art", Washington D.C., 1973, p. 108: "The tie seems to be symbolic of offering or sacrifice; I believe that tying is an integral part of the funerary ritual, and that the jar with the rope around the neck is the purest funerary symbol. The tied jar is perhaps in some way equivalent to the prisoner figure or the sacrificial limb or head". This "tie symbol", along with the raised conical projection which may represent a ceremonial sacrifical club, are both symbols that point to the fact that this vessel was also likely a "ceremonial offering vessel" that was associated with the ritual of "offering and sacrifice". Ex: Sotheby's New York, Antiquities, Tribal, Pre-Columbian and Later Works of Art, June 1981, no. 41. Ex: Dr. Klaus Maria collection, circa 1981-2012. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL test document from Gutachten Lab., no.481811, dated June 11th, 1983, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1378231
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This piece is an Egyptian wooden mummy mask that dates to the Late Period, circa 700-30 B.C. This wooden piece is approximately 8.3 inches high, by 5.3 inches wide, and is a solid example. This pleasing "two-part" piece has a nose attached to the main body of the piece with two wooden dowels, and there are six additional dowels that attached the mask to the coffin lid. Five of these dowels are still in place, and in addition, there is a single dowel seen below the chin that was used to attach the mask to an extended wooden beard. The eyes and eye brows were created with angular cuts, in addition to the upper wig. The face also was applied with a thick white gesso, and thick amounts of it can be seen in various sections of the face. This esoteric face also has a slight smile, and has a great deal of eye appeal. The backside of the mask is flat, as it was attached to the coffin lid. This piece is a superb example with it's sectional dowel construction, and likely was made for a young man. This attractive piece also comes with a custom display stand. Ex: Collection of Swanhild Castle, Brooklyn, New York, circa 1960's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1364438
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This extremely rare ceremonial stone ball is attributed to the Taino culture, and dates circa 1100-1250 A.D. This piece is approximately 5.3 inches in diameter, and is a perfect sphere. This piece is a hard sandstone that is native to the Caribbean region where the Taino culture dwelled, and there also have been many ceremonial ball-courts found in Puerto Rico, where the Mesoamerican ballgame was played with a rubber ball. The piece offered here may have been from this region of the Caribbean as well. This interesting piece features many geometric designs that were minutely hand pecked into the stone, and the designs appear to be a mirror image of one another when one rotates the stone. This piece was definitely a "votive-type" piece, and may also have been a trophy for the ball-game itself. The exact ceremonial nature of this piece is unknown, but what is known, is that this piece was definitely connected to the ceremonial ball-game. This game was also believed to have been played by only bumping the ball with the elbows and torso. This piece also has some minute dark black and gray mineral deposits, and some slight wear in various sections of the piece. This piece also comes with a Plexiglas display ring. Ex: Throckmorton Fine Art, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #994533
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,275.00
This piece is an extremely large Greek bronze bowl that dates circa 5th-4th century B.C. This exceptionally large piece is approximately 13.2 inches in diameter by 4.2 inches high, and has a superb dark green patina with light green and blue hues. This piece is intact and has no repair/restoration, and is in mint "as found" condition. This piece has two concentric circles that run around the main body of the vessel, and three concentric circles are seen within the raised base ring. These concentric circles are often seen on ancient Greek vessels that date from the 5th to the 4th century B.C. The metal is very thick on this piece, and this piece does have some noticable weight to it, and is somewhat heavy as it is approximately 4.8 pounds. This piece has a thick rounded rim, and this allows one to easily lift this piece with a solid grip. There are also no handles attached to the main body, and there is no indication that there were handles that were ever attached to this piece. This type of large vessel with no handles was made to hold wine and/or water for the table or bath, and was often placed on a raised stand. (For this type of vessel, see "Vergina, The Royal Tombs" by Manolis Andronicos, Ekdotike Athenon Pub., Athens, 1984.) This vessel may also have been made for heated water, and may have been used to cool the heated water for the bath, given the thickness of the metal. This piece is rare in this size and is a beautiful example with a high degree of eye appeal. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1398950
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This esoteric green hard stone piece is a Valdivia-Chorrera hacha that dates circa 1500-600 B.C., and is approximately 5.85 inches long, by 4 inches wide, by 1.7 inches thick. This piece was produced by the Valdivia-Chorrera culture that lived in modern day Ecuador, and was one of the earliest pre-Columbian cultures of South America. This piece is a votive type object and is shaped as a battle ax, and is a type that is also referred to as a "hacha". This piece was smoothed and polished into the refined form that we see today, and this process was very labor intensive. The surfaces of this piece are very refined, and one can easily see the veins and multi-colored inclusions which enhances it's sacred "raison d'etre". This piece is also a hard serpentine type stone, and it's dark green color was highly prized among many pre-Columbian cultures. A near identical example was offered at Christie's, Paris, Art Pre-Columbian: Collection Felix Et Heidi Stoll ET A Divers Amateurs, April, 2019, no. 8. (1,000.00-1,500.00 Euro estimates. 1,000.00 Euro realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's.-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1374530
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This mint quality piece is a Roman glass patella cup that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and is approximately 4.5 inches in diameter, by 1.5 inches high. This beautiful dark green glass piece is mint quality, has a thick honey brown patina seen mostly on the outer surfaces, and an iridescent silvery milky-white patina seen mostly on the inner surfaces. There is also some attractive minute root marking and some dark black mineral deposits seen within the thick encrusted surface patina. This piece has an applied ring base, a folded ring running around the rim, a raised inner base, and a pontil-mark on the bottom. This piece is also thin walled, and is very light in weight for it's size, and as such, is a rare example for the type. This piece is known as a "patella cup" due to it's design, and is one of the best examples for the type with it's exquisite patina. For an analogous example see: John Hayes, "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum", Toronto, 1975, no. 196, pl. 171. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1346703
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This scarce piece is a Greek bronze amulet that is seen in the form of the Greek goddess Baubo, and dates circa 5th-3rd century B.C. This piece is approximately 1.25 inches high by .65 inches wide, and is a complete example with no restoration/repair. This complete piece has a nice dark green patina with some light brown deposits, and is a solid cast example that likely served as a wearable amulet that hung from a necklace. This piece has a suspension hoop seen at the top of the head of the goddess, who is seen nude with her hands on her knees, and is revealing her over-sized vulva. The goddess Baubo was a fun-loving, bawdy, jesting, sexually liberated - yet very wise - goddess who played a crucial role in preserving the fertility of the land in ancient Greece. According to ancient Greek myth, Baubo stopped to rest in the city of Eleusis and had a conversation with the depressed Demeter, who was in deep mourning over the loss of her daughter Persephone who was abducted by Hades, the god of the underworld. Demeter abandoned her duties to bring fertility back to the land, until Baubo began chatting with Demeter using risqué remarks that brought a smile back to Demeter's face. Then, Baubo suddenly lifted her skirt revealing her vulva to Demeter who responded with a hearty belly laugh. Demeter's spirits were uplifted, and she was then able to persuade Zeus to release Persephone, which restored the fertility of the land. The piece offered here may have been worn by a woman, and/or a person who was also connected with the Eleusinian Mysteries. The followers of Baubo believed that enmity could be turned into friendship, and that all people are an integral part of the great cycles of nature. This piece is a scarce to rare example, and is a solid example that can easily be worn today. This piece also hangs on a custom display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1239393
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This attractive piece is a Vicus culture seated figurine that dates circa 200 B.C.-300 A.D. This piece is approximately 6.9 inches high, and is in mint to superb condition with no repair/restoration. This piece has a pleasing nice deep reddish-brown glaze, and has some minute root marking and some light blue/black spotty mineral deposits. This piece is a stirrup-type vessel, and it has a flat bottom. The legs and arms are seen tucked in close to the seated body, and this figurine seems to exhibit an inner core that is changing from an animal form to a human form, or vice-versa. This piece is classified as a "transformation type" ceramic, and this can especially be seen with the human facial features relative to the almond shaped eyes and well defined nose. The wide mouth appears to exhibit this change as well, as does the dual lobed head which is an anthropomorphic animal feature which is attributed to an animal such as a monkey. This piece is also an excellent example of a ceramic from the Vicus culture of ancient Peru, due to the reasons noted above, and most pieces from this culture seem to exhibit some form of "transformation" from one degree to another. This piece is also "thick walled", and has some weight to the piece. The early Peruvian ceramics from this culture were also fired at about 400 degrees C, thus producing a "thick walled" ceramic, as opposed to the subsequent Peruvian cultures such as the Moche, which produced "thin walled" ceramics which were fired at about 1000 degrees C. This piece is also analogous to an example seen in "Arts Ancient du Perou" by Bernard Villaret, Times Editions Pub., 1978, p. 51. (See attached photo.) This attractive piece has some weight, as one handles this piece, and is in scarce mint condition with a vibrant deep reddish-brown glaze. One of the best recorded examples. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection, Germany, circa 1980's. Ex: Auktion Ketterer 119, Zurich, 1987. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL test from Gutachten Lab., 11/23/1984, no. 584912, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1362320
Apolonia Ancient Art
$925.00
This superb graded ancient Greek coin is a silver didrachm that is attributed to the island of Corcyra (Corfu), and dates circa 229-180 B.C. This coin has an extremely large flan that is approximately 23mm in diameter, weighs 4.7 gms, and is superb condition (EF+/EF+). The obverse (Obv.) features the ivy wreathed bust of a young Dionysus facing right, within a dotted border; and the reverse (Rev.) shows the winged Pegasus flying right, with a ships prow symbol and a (PK) monogram below, and a (APK) monogram above. This coin is also perfectly centered and has an extremely large flan which shows all the elements noted above on the reverse, and this is rarely seen on this scarce issue. This coin may also have been over-struck over another coin, and during the minting process, the flan was hammered several times before being struck, and this may also explain the extremely large size of the flan. This coin also has high relief which is also seldom seen on this issue. This coin was also likely minted shortly after the island surrendered to the Romans circa 229 B.C., and it became a Roman protectorate. Although this coin is classified as being a Greek coin, it technically is a Roman coin, not only because of it's minting technique, but also because of the artistic style of the issue. This coin in fact has very analogous artistic style to many Roman Republic issues. The coin offered here is one of the best recorded examples, and is seldom seen on the market in this superb condition, centering, and extremely large flan. References: HGC 6, 65; Sear 2027. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1260877
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This scarce piece is a Mayan ceramic that dates circa 600-900 A.D. This piece is approximately 7 inches long, by 4.5 inches high, and is in superb intact condition with only a few minute abrasions. This piece also has an attractive orange and light brown polychrome glaze, with some heavy and spotty black mineral deposits. This interesting vessel is in the form of a sitting rabbit, and has all four legs tucked under the body. There is also a single rattle that is built into the animated hollow head, and rattles of this type are normally seen in the rounded hollow legs of select Mayan tripod vessels. This appealing vessel is designed to sit horizontally as a rabbit would be at rest, and also upright, as if the rabbit is raised up on it's hind legs. In addition, there are three suspension holes, one under each front leg, and one that runs through the head. This allowed one to control a liquid that could then be poured from the raised hole that is seen on the upper back of the rabbit. This piece also has a black Mayan mat symbol which is painted on the belly of the rabbit. The rabbit, for the Maya, was a deity associated with scribal or artistic roles, and was the patron god of the Mayan scribe. According to Michael Coe in "The Art of the Maya Scribe", Abrams Pub., New York, 1998, p. 110: "The much illustrated little Rabbit God writing a codex on the Princeton Vase makes only one showing as a scribe in the art of the classic Maya. He must be the same rabbit that the Maya saw on the face of the moon, and is iconographically linked with the Moon Goddess, who often is depicted holding him in her arms." The piece offered here may represent a scribe as a rabbit, but more likely it represents the "Rabbit God" himself, who also doubles as the patron god of the Mayan scribes. This vessel may also have been a "paint pot" for a Mayan scribe and/or it may also have been a votive vessel for an important individual such as a Mayan scribe. The artistic style of the painted black Mayan mat seen on this piece, is also analogous to the painted mats seen on "Copador" type vessels. The name "Copador" is a contraction of Copan and El Salvador, and refers to the zone of distribution for this type of vessel. This piece may also refer to the 13th ruler of Copan, "18 Rabbit", who acceded to the throne circa 695 A.D., and ruled for 43 years. Under his rule in Copan, Copan's population was growing as never before, and the "Copador" polychrome ware was being manufactured and distributed over a wide area in the Mayan world. This energetic ruler erected many monuments, including one of the largest ballcourts (Ballcourt A-III), which was second only to the Great Court at Chichen Itza. Linda Schele also felt that this ruler was also the greatest single patron of the arts in Copan's history, based on the number of works and the high-relief style of carving. (See "Scribes, Warriors, and Kings", by William Fash, Thames and Hudson Pub., 1991, p. 125.) Hence, it's quite possible that the vessel offered here also referred to this ruler of Copan, in addition to representing the "Rabbit God" of the Mayan scribes. This piece is a rare intact Mayan vessel designed in animal form, and full bodied Mayan "animal form" type ceramics are seldom seen on the market. Ex: William Freeman estate, New Mexico, circa 1960's-1980's. Ex: Private AZ. collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1358352
Apolonia Ancient Art
$8,675.00
This exceptional Mayan plate has a great deal of eye appeal, and dates circa 600-700 A.D. This large example is approximately 12.75 inches in diameter, by 3.25 inches high, and is intact with no repair/restoration. This attractive piece has a polychrome glaze on the upper inner surfaces that is seen with very vibrant orange, black, white, and light red colors. This piece also has some attractive minute root marking and some spotty black mineral deposits. The bottom side of the plate is a light tan terracotta with three rounded legs with rattles within, and the "shoulder line" seen on the underside is very sharp and well defined. The top inner surface displays a stylized bust facing left of "God K", otherwise known as "K'awil", who is seen with an elongated nose, ear-flares, an elaborate smoking-mirror headdress, and a line-designed mouth. "God K" was one of the Mayan gods of greatest importance, and was associated with the natural elements linked to agricultural activities such as rain and thunder. The stylized bust is surrounded by four smoking scrolls that also refer to the four "cardinal directional points" that were sacred to the Maya. The entire bust design is also rendered with a stylized "circle-and-dot pattern" which also has filled colors within the circles, and this design type is of an artistic style that is associated with the Peten region. (For the design type, see a bowl published in: "Maya, Treasures of an Ancient Civilization", Abrams Pub., 1985, no. 122. See attached photo.) This piece also has a large black glyph band that frames the inner bust of "God K", and this contains glyphs that are associated with the "PSS" (Primary Standard Sequence) that was identified by Michael Coe. This glyph band was also painted by a very accomplished painter. Overall, this piece is an exceptional example of Mayan art that is also in superb to mint condition. Ex: Ferdinand Anton collection, Germany, circa 1959. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1374638
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This pleasing Greek silver tetradrachm was minted in Amphipolis (Northern Greece) under Roman control, circa 167-149 B.C., is approximately 35mm wide, and grades EF(Extremely Fine)/EF(Extremely Fine). This piece has on the obverse (Obv.) the beautiful and draped bust of Artemis facing right, with a bow case behind, all within a dotted border. This bust is also seen centered on a Macedonian shield that has a border of stars and dots. Artemis is also seen with long flowing hair, and is an excellent image of the goddess. The entire design of the obverse is a shield design, and perhaps represents a shield type of the Macedonian royal house that was defeated under Perseus at Pydna, circa 168 B.C. The reverse (Rev.) shows the club of Herakles, with Greek lettering above and below, meaning MAKEDONON and PROTES (First region.). There are also three monograms, one above the club, and two below; and all this is within an ivy wreath with a dot-pattern thunderbolt symbol at the left. For twenty years, from circa 168-148 B.C., after the defeat of Perseus by the Romans, Macedonia was divided into four autonomous administrative regions in order to weaken the power of the area and increase dependence on the empire. The coin type offered here was minted in the first region (PROTES) at it's capital Amphipolis. The issue of the coin offered here was minted over a relatively short period of time, and this coin with it's superb artistic style and grade is becoming more scarce on the market. This piece has some mint luster, has extremely high relief, and is an exceptional coin minted under Roman control. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1989. References: SNG Copenhagen 1314; AMNG III 176. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1360699
Apolonia Ancient Art
$965.00
This rare coin is a Greek silver drachm from the Epirote Republic, and dates circa 234-168 B.C. This coin is superb grade (EF+/EF+) condition, weighs 4.8 grams, and is approximately 22 mm in diameter. This coin also has a large flan, and is a well centered example. This coin has on the obverse: a detailed and laureate bust of Zeus facing right, and three separate monograms seen behind and below the bust. The reverse has: a standing eagle on a thunderbolt facing right, with the legend ADEI before, and PUTAN behind, all within a laurel wreath that is seen framing the border. The monograms seen on the obverse may refer the the magistrate that minted this coin and/or the name of the current ruler of the Epirote Republic. The reverse legend also refers to the Epirote Republic as well, and this coin was likely minted in the sacred site of Dodona. Another analogous example of this rare coin type was sold by Nomos AG in Zurich, Switzerland, Oct. 2015, no. 85. (Estimate 500 CHF, 2200 CHF realized. EF/EF- grade. See attached photo.) References: Franke, Epirus, Series 29 (var.); SNG Cop 114. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1386086
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This intact Chavin piece is a canteen designed vessel with a seated deity that dates to the Middle Chavin Period, circa 1000-700 B.C. This interesting piece is approximately 8.75 inches high, by 4.5 inches in diameter at the center of the vessel. This piece is a seated deity with a rounded body, extended nose, and appears to be wearing a skull cap and a loose mantle. There are also two suspension holes seen on each side of the raised spout, and this piece may have been carried as a canteen that likely held a sacred liquid. The arms and hands are also tucked in at the front, and has an analogous design as the sculptural deities that were excavated by Julio Tello at Moxeke, Peru. (See attached photo that is seen in "Chavin and the Origins of Andean Civilization" by Richard Burger, Thames and Hudson Pub., 1992, p. 83, fig. 66.) There is also a strong probability that this piece is a "ceremonial type" vessel and was used for offerings and ceremony. This piece has a thick dark gray glaze over the entire vessel, some attractive dark brown burnishing, and is intact with no repair and/or restoration. This piece is not only a scarce to rare Chavin vessel that is seldom seen on the market, but more importantly, it is also an important ceremonial type that depicts a sacred deity. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export, and US Customs Import documentation. In addition, there is a TL authentication lab test from Gutachten Lab, Germany, dated 06/11/1979, no. 3679116. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1118927
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This interesting piece is a Greek terracotta mask that is in the form of a Satyr mask. This piece dates circa 2nd-1st century B.C., and is approximately 5.1 inches high by 4.2 inches wide. This piece is complete, and is intact, save for some very minute and old stress crack fill. This piece was mold made from a light yellow/tan terracotta, and it has nice detail. There are spotty dark black and brown deposits, along with some minute root marking. This piece is in the form of a Satyr head who is seen with an open mouth, goat horns at the top of the forehead, and goat ears. Satyrs were renowned for their lascivious appetites and mischievous behaviour, and personified the unrestrained fertility of Nature in the wild. They particularly enjoyed pursuing the nymphs, on whom they hoped to gratify their lust. In ancient Greek literature the Satyrs, like the Seleni, were debased and comic figures, for it was the custom of the Greek tragic poets, after presenting a trilogy of plays recounting one of the serious mythological dramas, to terminate their contributions to the festival of Dionysus with the performance of a light comedy based on the activities of these untragic folk. The type of terracotta mask offered here, was associated with the choruses of Greek drama and were often dedicated by revelers during Dionysiac festivals. This piece is likely a votive comic mask, and masks of this type were often dedicated to shrines, and/or graves, by individuals who were linked to the theater, either as a known patron, participant, or admirer of the arts. This dramatic piece shows the face of a Satyr with an open mouth and eyes, which conveys a look of surprize and perhaps even an emotion such as fear. The hole seen at the top of the forehead also allowed this piece to hang as a votive offering. This piece also hangs on a custom black plexiglas stand, and has a great deal of eye appeal. Ex: David Leibert collection, New York, circa 1980's. (Another Greek terracotta theater mask of this analogous type and size from the David Leibert collection, was offered at Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2001, no. 185. $3,000.00-$5,000.00 estimates.) (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1370697
Apolonia Ancient Art
Call For Price
This mint quality Greek Illyrian helmet dates circa 6th century B.C., and is approximately 12 inches high, from the top of the crest box to the tip of the cheek pieces, and it is a full size example. This beautiful piece has been classified in "Antike Helm", Lipperheide and Antikenmuseums Collections, Mainz, Germany, 1988, pp. 59-64, as being "Type II, Var.B". This piece is in flawless, mint condition, and has no repair/restoration, and is one of the best examples on the global market. This piece has slightly elongated cheek pieces, a detailed punched decorative dotted band that runs around the outer perimeter edge, and a well-defined crest box. This piece was hand beaten from one sheet of bronze, and the crest box was added into the construction of the helmet, not only to define an attachment area for the crest which was likely made from bird quills, but also to give extra strength to the main body of the piece. The added crest box also was designed to protect the warrior from overhead blows. There is also a slightly extended neck guard which is finely made as well. This exceptional example also has some very minor horizontal scraps and nicks which is also an indication that this piece was in battle. This piece has a compact and attractive design, and is one of the top examples for the type. In addition, this piece has an exceptional dark green patina with dark blue highlights which lends this piece a great deal of eye appeal. The patina seen on this attractive piece is also in "as found" condition, and this helmet has not been over cleaned as most examples. This piece also comes with a custom metal display stand. Ex Axel Guttmann collection, Inventory no. 517, Berlin, Germany, circa 1980's. Ex: Private Dallas, Texas collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: