Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #824649
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This interesting piece is from the Jama-Coaque culture that lived in the tropical forest coast region of northern Ecuador near the Esmeraldas River. This area is also the region where the Spaniards first encountered the native South Americans. The piece offered here is approximately 10 inches high, dates circa 500 B.C.-500 A.D., and is intact, save for some missing coffee bean ends seen on the headdress and a very small section of the headdress behind the right ear, and this may have been done as this piece was a burial offering. These breaks appear to be very old, as there is wear in the break areas with burial deposits, and this may have been done to break the "mana" and/or magic of the piece for burial. The seated figurine may be a shaman that is seen wearing a headdress, shirt, earrings, and nose ring that are decorated with coffee bean symbols. He also has coffee bean designed eyes and is seen holding a lime pot in his right hand and in his left, a coca pod. (For the type see: "Pre-Columbian Art" by Jose Alcina Franch, Abrams Pub., New York, 1983, no. 595.) There are traces of painted designs seen on the lower legs, headdress, and skirt. This piece has spotty black mineral deposits and some minute root marking. An example and type that is now scarce on the market. Ex: Private Arizona collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Howard Rose collection, New York, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1331717
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This extremely rare weapon is a bronze mace/sword that dates circa 1800-1200 B.C. This piece is approximately 17.5 inches long, by 2 inches wide at it's widest point, which is near the tip end of the weapon. This piece was hand forged from bronze, and is a thick and heavy bronze weapon. This piece also graduates in thickness from the shank end to the tip of the weapon, and at the tip of the weapon, this heavy weapon is approximately .32 inches thick. This piece was made as a combination mace and a "blunt-ended" type sword, which had devastating effect on heavily armed warriors that had helmets and other body armor. This weapon was designed to crush helmets with it's blunt end, and penetrate armor with sheer force. This piece also has an attachment hole near the tip end which was likely used to hold a leather tie that was used either to hang or suspend the weapon for use. This piece likely did not fit into a scabbard, as the shape of this weapon with the curved end would not easily fit into a scabbard as a straight blade can. In addition, this extremely rare weapon either had a handle attached to the shank for use with one hand, or it may have had an extended wooden shaft attached to the shank that was used by the warrior with two hands. An extended handle of this type would generate a tremendous amount of force, and it may be that a weapon of this type was used by a warrior in a war chariot or from horseback. There is also the possibility that if this weapon had an extended handle, it may have been used by infantry against mounted or chariot forces in order to crush their heavy armor. This weapon may also be of a type that was also used in the battle of Kadesh, circa 1274 B.C., which was the largest chariot battle ever fought in antiquity, and involved perhaps 5,000-6,000 war chariots. This battle pitted the Hittite Empire under Muwatalli II against the Egyptian Empire under Ramesses II, and many types of weapons were created by both sides for this conflict. The metal composition of this impressive weapon has sections with striated surfaces, and this type of metal composition does match other Egyptian bronze weaponry from the period, and the form of this weapon is somewhat analogous to the Egyptian sickle sword known as a "khopesh". This type of weapon was also designed to pull with a hook at the end, stab with it's pointed end, and slice with it's curved blade. This "khopesh" is a muti-purpose designed weapon, as the mace/sword weapon offered here, and both of these types of weapons could be used several ways in battle. The mace/sword weapon offered here has a "flat mace edge" on one side that is for a crushing application, and the other side has a "blunt sword edge" for a cutting and slicing application. This piece also has several dark brown and green mineral deposits seen in various sections of the piece, and some spotty red and dark brown highlights within the metal. This piece is also 100% intact, and has no repair/restoration. Overall, this complete piece is an extremely rare weapon that is highly specialized, is one of the most devastating weapons from antiquity, and is a weapon that has seldom been on the market. A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1354392
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This superb piece is a Greek bronze oinochoe that dates circa mid 5th century B.C. This complete piece is approximately 6 inches high, and is an intact example with no repair/restoration. This intact piece is in superb to mint condition, with only some very minor scrapes and minute dents, which makes it much better than what is normally seen on the market. This piece has a flat bottom and easily stands by itself, and has a graceful upper shoulder and extended neck that runs up into a trefoil spout. This piece also has an added handle that is solid, and attaches to the main body of the piece and at the top of the trefoil spout. This piece was hand beaten from one sheet of bronze and graduates in thickness from the bottom to the spout lip which is at it's thinnest point. The piece also has a beautiful and even dark green patina with some dark brown, light blue, and red highlights, and in addition, there is some attractive minute root marking. The workmanship of this piece is exceptional, and this piece has a very graceful and compact shape. The shape and/or form of this vessel is also seen relative to numerous ceramic examples that copy it's graceful size and shape. This piece was used for fine dining, and likely held a concentrated wine that was mixed with water. This piece also made it very easy to pour a liquid, as the trefoil spout could pour a liquid in three directions. A piece with a great deal of eye appeal, and is scarce in the market in this superb condition. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is included for the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #875428
Apolonia Ancient Art
$325.00
This Greek bronze coin is classified as an AE 18, and was minted by Philip II circa 359-336 B.C., and is in nearly Extremely Fine to Very Fine condition (VF+/VF+). The classification as an AE 18, derives from the average diameter of this type of coin which is approximately 18mm in diameter. The obverse displays the bust of a young Apollo seen facing the the left, and the reverse, shows a naked youth on a running horse that is facing right. The reverese has the name of Philip above and below, is a monogram which may be a mint control mark. This piece has a lustrous superb dark green patina that is much better than other examples of this type, and has a Very Fine Plus (VF+) grade. This piece is also perfect for a ring or a pendant. See David Sear, "Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. II", Seaby Pub., London, 1979, no. 6698 for the type. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1385577
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This superb to mint quality coin is a Greek gold stater of Alexander the Great, circa 323-320 B.C., and grades EF+/FDC (Extremely Fine+/Mint State). This beautiful coin also weighs 8.6 gms, and is perfectly centered. This coin was minted in Miletos, and was struck under Philoxenos, who was a general of Alexander the Great. The obverse (Obv.) of this coin features the helmeted head of Athena facing right, and is wearing a Corinthian helmet with a coiled serpent. There are also flowing locks of hair seen on the cheek and neck, which is also a unique feature of this obverse die and coin type. The reverse (Rev.) has a finely detailed and exceptional standing Nike holding a victory wreath in her extended right hand, and a stylis in the left hand. The Nike seen here is also one of the best examples seen on a coin of this type, as one can see the minute facial details that are not normally seen. There is also a (Delta H) monogram in the left field. (Another example of this type and grade was offered by Larry Goldberg Coins & Collectibles, Auction 72, no. 4047. $2,500.00-$3,000.00 estimates, $5,000.00 realized.) References: Price 2078; SNG Ashmolean 2774. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1378644
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This piece is a Colima obsidian blade that dates circa 100 B.C.-250 A.D., and is approximately 8.2 inches long. This piece was skillfully chipped into the scarce shape that is seen today, and was formed into a weapon that has a combination blade and handle. This form is rare to scarce relative to Colima blades of this type, as they are usually designed into a "double-pointed" blade with no handle. This piece was likely a ceremonial blade that was created also as a "votive" type object, and may have been buried as a "cache" offering. This blade still has extremely sharp edges, and is in mint quality condition with no repair and/or restoration. The fact that this scarce to rare example was votive not only explains it's mint quailty condition, but also it's design, as it was made for use in the afterlife. This piece also slides onto its included custom display stand, and has a great deal of eye appeal. Ex: David Harner collection, Arkansas, circa 1950's-1960's. Ex: Marjorie Barrick Museum, UNLV, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1307575
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This exceptional Greek ceramic is a Messapian trozella that dates circa 400-300 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.9 inches high, by 8.25 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece has two applied strap handles to a pear-shaped body that has a raised foot. The handles also have four disks built into the handle junctions, and the description "trozella" has the meaning "little wheels", and "trozella" is a very appropriate description for vessels of this type. The esoteric piece offered here is an early example, as it has a shorter pear-shaped body with a footed base, rather than an extended body with a raised foot with a spread base. The earlier examples are much rarer, and often have beautiful detailed painting as the example has here. Vessels of this type also generally have painted sections that are worn, and in many cases the painted images are completely worn off, but the images seen on this exquisite vessel are nearly entirely intact, and can clearly be seen on both sides of the vessel. These vessels were also painted after the vessel was fired in the kiln, and were quickly re-fired again, and this is why the painted images seen on vessels of this type are generally faded and are not very bright. The painting seen on this exceptional piece is extremely fine and detailed, and shows reddish-brown acanthus patterns on the upper shoulder that are connected with a single fine line with added dots. There are added geometric "cross-and-line" patterns seen on various sections of the vessel, and the two boxes seen on the upper shoulder have dark red defining lines. The overall esoteric design of this vessel, along with the delicate painting, make this vessel one of the finest examples of this type that has been on the market. The description "Messapian" also refers to the Greek colonists and native Greek peoples that settled in the southern heel of Italy. It is unkown if this early example was produced locally, or was a production in a Greek city made for import into the region. Given the delicate Greek acanthus designs, and the fact that this piece is a rarer earlier example, I am leaning to the latter scenario that this piece may have been produced for import into the region. This piece also has some minute dark spotty black mineral deposits, along with some heavier root marking seen on the inside of the vessel and the upper flat rim. Another analogous vessel that is a later type, was offered by Sotheby's Antiquities, Dec. 2007, no. 129. ($5,000.00-$8,000.00 estimates, $4,688.00 realized.) The vessel offered here is rare on the market, as it is an early example, has delicately painted fine design work, and is in mint condition. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: New York private collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1207767
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,865.00
This scarce Pre-Columbian piece is a Mayan cylinder vessel that dates Late Classic, circa 550-950 A.D. This attractive piece is approximately 7 inches high by 4.9 inches in diameter. This superb to mint quality vessel is a "Molded Orangeware Vessel", El Salvador/Honduras region, that has well-defined mold made impressions seen within two box-shaped fields seen on each side of the vessel. Each box-shaped field has a standing Mayan priest/dignitary holding an elongated rectangular object in his extended right hand, and the other panel shows this rectangular object hanging on the right elbow of this standing individual. This standing Mayan priest/dignitary seen within both panels has his head placed within a raptorial beaked bird, which may represent a sacred "Moan Bird", and this raptorial beaked bird is likely a ceremonial headdress. This individual is also seen wearing royal ear flares and bracelets, has a water-lily emerging from his lips, and is wearing a sashed lioncloth. There is also a stippled woven mat pattern seen in the background, and the overall composition on both panels have very sharp details and is better than most examples. In addition, each panel shows this standing individual in a slightly different position, and this design conveys a slight movement of this individual, as one views this exceptional piece from panel to panel. This convention of art relative to Mayan ceramics, is generally seen on scarce to rare Mayan molded vessels of this type. This intact piece also has some attractive light gray burnishing, some minute root marking, and spotty dotted black mineral deposits. An analogous example is seen in Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, Nov. 24, 1986, no. 127. ($1,500.00-$2,500.00 estimates, $2,750.00 realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1239393
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This attractive piece is a Vicus culture seated figurine that dates circa 200 B.C.-300 A.D. This piece is approximately 6.9 inches high, and is in mint to superb condition with no repair/restoration. This piece has a pleasing nice deep reddish-brown glaze, and has some minute root marking and some light blue/black spotty mineral deposits. This piece is a stirrup-type vessel, and it has a flat bottom. The legs and arms are seen tucked in close to the seated body, and this figurine seems to exhibit an inner core that is changing from an animal form to a human form, or vice-versa. This piece is classified as a "transformation type" ceramic, and this can especially be seen with the human facial features relative to the almond shaped eyes and well defined nose. The wide mouth appears to exhibit this change as well, as does the dual lobed head which is an anthropomorphic animal feature which is attributed to an animal such as a monkey. This piece is also an excellent example of a ceramic from the Vicus culture of ancient Peru, due to the reasons noted above, and most pieces from this culture seem to exhibit some form of "transformation" from one degree to another. This piece is also "thick walled", and has some weight to the piece. The early Peruvian ceramics from this culture were also fired at about 400 degrees C, thus producing a "thick walled" ceramic, as opposed to the subsequent Peruvian cultures such as the Moche, which produced "thin walled" ceramics which were fired at about 1000 degrees C. This piece is also analogous to an example seen in "Arts Ancient du Perou" by Bernard Villaret, Times Editions Pub., 1978, p. 51. (See attached photo.) This attractive piece has some weight, as one handles this piece, and is in scarce mint condition with a vibrant deep reddish-brown glaze. One of the best recorded examples. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection, Germany, circa 1980's. Ex: Auktion Ketterer 119, Zurich, 1987. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL test from Gutachten Lab., 11/23/1984, no. 584912, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #993691
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This impressive piece is a huge example of a Greek terracotta mother goddess. This piece dates from the Archaic Period, circa late 6th century-early 5th century B.C., and is an impressive 17 inches high. This attractive piece is intact, save for some minor repair at the base, and is 100% original. Given the extremely large size of this piece, this piece is in remarkable condition and it also stands by itself on its square base. This piece is also rare in this size, as the majority of Archaic period Greek terracottas of this type range from approximately 10-12 inches in height. This piece is also in "as found" condition, as it has a light gray earthen glaze that is layered over the light orange terracotta. This piece has a very lively face, as seen with a slight smile and large almond eyes, which are both hallmarks of "Archaic period" Greek art, and the overall effect is a face that is very serene. (For an "Archaic period" marble monument in the form of a sphinx, circa 550-525 B.C., with very analogous facial details to the terracotta offered here, see "Archaic Greek Art" by Gisela Richter, Oxford University Press, New York, 1949, p.76, fig. 121. This example was considered by Richter as having the best Greek Attic artistic style and "Attic grave monuments of the third quarter of the sixth century are among the finest extant.") The terracotta offered here may be an Attic type as well, and is also a type found on Samos. This type of archaic Greek standing goddess is seen holding a dove in her right hand, and is wearing a long pleated chiton. This piece may represent a votaress presenting an offering to Demeter or Persephone, and in this case the offering is a dove. This piece may also double as a votive offering itself, in addition as being an image of a votive standing mother goddess, and may be connected to reproduction and birth/rebirth. The design of this piece with one foot slightly placed in front of the other is also derived from Egyptian works of art. (For the type see R.A. Higgins, "Catalogue of the Terracottas in the Department of Greek and Roman Antiquities, British Museum, Vol I", London, 1954.) A custom black marble stand is included. Large Greek terracottas of this type are extremely rare to rare, especially in this superb condition, and are seldom seen on the market. Ex: Private Austrian collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1378546
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This very rare Greek (EL) electrum stater is from Kyzikos, and dates circa 550-450 B.C. This coin is approximately 20mm wide, weighs 16.12 gms, and is in extremely fine condition (EF/EF). This coin has a light reddish/brown patina, and perfect centering. The (OBV.) features a bust of Athena wearing a crested "Attic type" helmet facing left, with a zig-zag and pellet pattern designed crest base, and a tunny fish below. The (Rev.) features a quadripartite incuse square. This coin probably was influenced by the helmeted Athena coinage of Athens, and perhaps signaled a trade alliance. An exceptional specimen not often seen on the market. References: Boston MFA 1446; Gulbenkian 609. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Roma Numismatics, Auction IX, 2015, no. 320. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #1355169
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This beautiful piece is a light blue Roman glass ribbed bowl that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 6.75 inches in diameter, by 2.2 inches high, and is in flawless condition with no hairline cracks, chips, or any other imperfections. This piece also has 26 vertical ribs that increase in thickness, and run upwards from the flat bottom to just below the upper rim. This type of bowl is also known as a "pillar-molded" bowl, as it was mold made, and was then ground and polished into shape. There are also two decorative well-defined "wheel-cut concentric grooves", and a small well-defined "wheel-cut circle" seen on the inner bottom center of the bowl. In addition, there are two shallow "wheel-cut grooves" that are seen running around the middle of the inner wall. These shallow "wheel-cut grooves" are also so shallow in sections that they do not appear to have been intended as a decorative type element, but rather are marks that resulted from centering a polishing tool within the inner surface of the bowl. There are also some faint polishing lines still visible on the inner surface, as this piece is in mint condition, and may have been offered solely as a votive type object. This piece also has a spotty multi-colored iridescence, and some light earthen deposits seen mostly on the outer surface of the vessel. The exceptional piece offered here is also one of the better recorded examples, and is nearly identical and larger than the example sold in Christies Antiquities, New York, June 2012, lot 151 ($4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates, $9,375.00 realized. 5.4 inches in diameter, with 22 vertical ribs. See attached photo.) Another example that was recently sold was offered in Christie's Antiquities, London, July 2016, lot 204 ($15,000.00-$22,000.00 estimates, $16,138.00 realized. 5.75 inches in diameter, with 26 vertical ribs.) The piece offered here is not only one of the best recorded examples, but it is also a beautiful example with a light blue color that has a high degree of eye appeal, and as such, it compares in color and quality to the two other examples noted above. For the type see John Hayes, "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum", 1975, nos. 50-52. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Indian Subcontinent : India : Pre AD 1000 item #661705
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This superb red sandstone fragment is from central India and dates to the Post-Gupta period, circa 8th-9th Century A.D. This piece is approximately 16 inches high and is mounted on a custom metal stand. This piece may originally have been part of a stele and/or a temple. There is a section on the right side of this piece that is flat, and this side may have been the inner part of a doorway. There are also four smiling Nagas seen on this piece with intertwined serpent tails and cobra hoods above their heads. Their raised clasped hands are seen in the Anjali Mudra position, and they are positioned at an angle so that they view the person that would pass through the doorway. There is also an elaborate foliage pattern seen on the edge, and the overall design of this piece is very esoteric. There is an analogous piece that is seen in the Mr. and Mrs. Harold P. Ullman Collection and is published in "Art of the Indian Subcontinent From Los Angeles Collections", Ward Ritchie Press, 1968. This piece may be a part of the same building and/or stele, as this piece also forms part of a door jam. This piece, and the piece offered here, are both extremely fine examples of ancient Indian art and are in superb condition with clear detailed carving. These carvings are highly spiritual, and were intended to protect the viewer, as this was the reason for the depiction of the Nagas. A nice heavy piece with a high degree of spiritual feeling. Ex: Sotheby's New York, "Indian, Himalayan, and Southeast Asian Art", March, 1990. Ex: Private Los Angeles collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1119679
Apolonia Ancient Art
$965.00
This rare ancient Greek coin is a silver tetradrachm that was minted by Seleukos I, circa 305-290 B.C., weighs approximately 15.8 gms, and is in Extremely Fine/Good Very Fine condition (EF/VF+). Seleukos I was a general under Alexander the Great, and established his capital in Babylon circa 305 B.C. Seleukos was subsequently able to recover the Asian possessions of Alexander by winning military victories over some of the other former generals of Alexander the Great. The obverse of the rare coin offered here has the head of Herakles facing right, seen wearing a lion's skin head dress; and the reverse has a seated Zeus facing left, holding an eagle. The name of Seleukos is seen behind the seated Zeus, and before, is the forepart of a horse and an anchor symbol which are both mint marks of Seluekos I. This coin was minted in Ecbatana, which was the summer residence of the Persian kings, and is modern day Hamadan in western Iran. This coin was classified in "Coins of the Seleucid Empire from the Collection of Arthur Houghton", by Arthur Houghton, American Numismatic Society, New York, 1983, as being from the Ecbatana mint and minted within the same series as nos. 1128 & 1129, Pl. 67. The coin type seen here is a continuation of the "Herakles-Zeus" type coinage of Alexander the Great which had been inaugurated during his lifetime, and Seleukos I simply substituted his name from that of Alexander, and added his mint mark symbols. One added difference is that the head of Herakles seen on the obverse, may be a deified portrait of Alexander who died in Babylon circa 323 B.C., as the eye clearly is designed in an upturned manner, and this is a Greek Hellenistic convention of portraiture that is intended to show a deified god. In addition, the obverse shows a slight fleshy lump above the nose and lower forehead which Alexander was thought to have developed in the latter stages of his life. The choice of Seleukos continuing the Alexander "Herakles-Zeus" type of coinage, also tied Seleukos I closer to Alexander, and helped to legitimize his rule in Asia. This coin is a rare type, as classified in the "Celebrated Collection of Coins formed by the late Richard C. Lockett, Greek, Part IV, Glendining & Co., London, 1961, no. 2548, Pl. XV. This coin is very different than the bulk of the Alexander "Herakles-Zeus" type coinage, because rather than portraying Herakles on the obverse, this coin type portrays not only Herakles, but also Alexander the Great as a god. There are very few obverse dies that show Herakles with the upturned eye as well, and this was a development in ancient Greek Hellenistic coinage that is seen only after the death of Alexander in 323 B.C. Ex: Spink & Son, London, circa 1960's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1293208
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This primitive, but esoteric piece is a Chontal culture seated mother goddess that dates circa 300-100 B.C. This piece is approximately 4.9 inches high, by 3.4 inches wide, by 1.9 inches thick. This piece was carved from a single piece of hard green serpentine stone, and is an attractive dark green, with spotty light brown and black colors. This piece has a nice patina with some calcite deposits seen in some of the minute veins that run on the outer surface of this piece, and there is some minute root marking as well. In addition, this piece was polished in antiquity, and has a bright surface. This piece is also intact, with no repair/restoration, and has a small excavation mark on the back side. This piece is a "mother goddess" type, and is seen seated and holding her hands to her breasts. This attractive piece is also likely a fertility type piece, as this "mother goddess" emphasizes her breasts that are full of "mother's milk". This piece also emphasizes the Chontal culture artistic style which shows coffee bean eyes, double-line lips, square nose, and incised lines for the fingers and toes. This piece also shows the head slightly angled to the left, which offers this piece a more animated appearance. The Chontal culture is also contemporary with the Mezcala culture, and the design of the Chontal figurines have more rounded and defined features than the Mexcala culture, which tend to have very angular lines and features. The type of piece seen here is scarce to rare, and is not often seen on the market. This piece can also stand by itself, and simply sits on the included display base. (For the type see: Carlo Gay and Frances Pratt, "Mezcala", Geneva, 1992.) Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Howard Rose collection, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1283823
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This visually appealing piece is a Roman marble of the goddess Minerva, and dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 8.75 inches high, by 5 inches wide. This piece is a helmeted bust of the Roman goddess Minerva, who also doubled as the Greek goddess Athena. This piece shows Minerva with finely carved hair that is seen under the edges of the Corinthian type helmet, and is a portrait of a young woman that conveys the eternal beauty of the goddess. She is also seen with a serene expression, and her rounded chin also conveys a goddess that is perceived as a powerful woman. The helmet also has a raised crest, and has an inset square dowel joint on each side that probably supported a running Pegasus that was mounted on each side of the helmet. In addition, this piece is carved in the round, and the helmet design is seen on the back side of the bust as well. The face is completely intact, with no major breaks, and the carving of the eyes, nose, and the delicate mouth is extremely detailed. The eyes also have center drilled dots with a carved circular iris, which give this piece a very dynamic "alive" look, and the treatment of the eyes in this fashion is typical for Roman portraiture especially during the Antonine Period, circa 2nd century A.D. This piece also has a nice light gray patina, with heavier dark gray mineral deposits seen at the back of the bust. This piece is also analogous in design to the earlier Greek Athenian coinage, circa 5th century B.C., which shows on the obverse a helmeted Athena in profile wearing a Corinthian type helmet, with a helmet crest and dotted necklace. This piece also follows the design of the Greek gold coinage of Alexander the Great, who placed a helmeted bust of Athena on the obverse of his gold staters, circa late 4th century B.C. This piece is scarce to rare on the market, as it likely completed a full size standing and draped statue of the goddess. The portrait type of this piece was derived from an earlier Greek prototype, which is thought to be a large full standing bronze cult statue that is known as the "Athena Sunias", which was displayed in a temple dedicated to Athena at Cape Sounion. (See G. Despinis, "Athena Sunias-Eine Vermutung", Archaologischer Anzeiger, 1999, pp. 173-181.) An analogous example without the helmet crest and dotted necklace, and of nearly the same size was offered by Halan J. Berk of Chicago, Ill. in "Ancient Art", 1987, no. 45. (See attached photo.) The Berk example was also mounted on a custom display stand, as the piece offered here, with a center pin running up into the lower neck where the break occurred. The piece offered here has a great deal of eye appeal, as the facial design of this piece, especially with the treatment of the eyes and delicate mouth, provide this piece with a very dynamic "alive" and "penetrating" look. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, circa 2000-2014, Inv.# P33-059-012614b. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1340042
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This complete piece is a Greek silver neck section for a vessel, and dates circa 5th-4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 4 inches diameter, by 2.8 inches high. This piece is slightly oval in shape, and has slightly sloping sides. This piece has exceptional workmanship, and was hammered into shape from one solid sheet of silver. In addition, this piece has an extremely detailed beaded lip border, with minute beading which only a skilled artist could have produced. This piece was made as a section for a large silver vessel such as a hydria, or a stamnos, and both of these vessel types had an extended neck that reached upwards from the main body of the vessel, along with handles that were attached to the main body of the vessel. This pieced may also have been produced for fitting into a ceramic vessel body, and although this is rare, it is a known type of use. This piece likely was never used, and could have been made as a votive type use, and was never intended for use in real life. This piece also could have been produced for use into a silver vessel at a later time, as was perhaps lost in the production process, or became war booty that was hoarded away. Whatever the case, this piece is a rare example as a section such as this, and is an excellent case study as to how a complete silver vessel could have been produced. This piece also appears to be a complete neck section, with no apparent cut marks showing in the lower edge, although there is some lower edge roughness that is to be expected. This piece also has an attractive dark to light gray patina, and there are some sections that have spotty dark to light black mineral deposits, along with some additional minute mineralization and root marking. This type of piece is seldom seen on the market, and is an exceptional example for the type. This piece also sits on a custom metal and Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Private New Jersey collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1027193
Apolonia Ancient Art
$765.00
This extremely rare piece is an early Islamic glass flask, circa 6th-8th century A.D. This intact piece is approximately 2.8 inches high, and is a light green color with multi-colored iridescence that is seen on various inner and outer sections of the vessel. This piece is rather thick walled, has a fairly wide indented bottom, a short tubular neck that has a slight flattening at the base, and a pontil-mark on the bottom. In addition, the neck is folded to the inside, and there are three stepped bulges seen within the neck which are a light yellow, green, and purple color. This piece is likely an early example of Islamic glass, due to the overall fabric of the vessel and the neck design as noted above. This piece is from an extremely rare early Islamic glass group, and some of these extremely rare pieces from this group are also listed as "possibly Sassanian", but given the probable region, i.e. Syro-Palestinian or Cypriot, where this piece was likely manufactured, a Sassanian attribution from modern day central Iran is highly unlikely. This piece, as being from this extremely rare early Islamic glass group, is also one of the earliest Islamic glass examples recorded. An analogous example listed as "possibly Islamic and of possible Syro-Palestinian or Cypriot manufacture", approximately 2.5 inches high, is seen in "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum", by John B. Hayes, Royal Ontario Museum Pub., 1975, no. 670. (See attached photo.) Another extremely rare example is seen in Sotheby Park Bernet Inc., Important Antiquities, New York, Dec. 1978, no. 138. (This piece is nearly the same size as the piece offered here, and is listed as "probably later Sassanian or early Islamic, circa 5th-8th century A.D.") The example offered here has a type of construction within the neck that required a great deal of skill, and is more advanced than the typical late Roman blown glass that is seen in the 4th-5th century A.D. Islamic glass also tends to have several colors within the glass, in contrast to the Sassanian culture, which was known for producing faceted cut glass that was more uniform in color. The Sassanian culture, circa 6th-8th century A.D., was from central modern day Iran, and was very skilled at glass production, and they are known for being able to take a solid cube of glass and carve/sculpt this into a faceted cup, bowl, or a plate. The exceptional small flask offered here is not only in mint condition, but it is also a type that is not seen on the market or in private collections. This extremely rare piece is a little gem and would be an excellent addition to a collection of ancient glass. Ex: Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: