Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1385660
Apolonia Ancient Art
$465.00
This powerful piece is a bronze Luristan panther head finial piece that dates circa 1000-650 B.C., and is approximately 2 inches high. This complete piece is the terminal end for a finial that may have been part of a staff, or a section of a horse or wagon fitting. The panther head image seen here is very powerful, and has an open roaring mouth, a flat front nose, and rounded ears seen at the back of the head. This type of piece was also a "protector" type piece, and was integrated with the "Master of the Animals Cult" that was prevalent with this culture. This piece is a solid cast example, and is rather heavy, as there is no hollow core. This piece also has a lovely dark green patina with some spotty dark red highlights, along with some minute white calcite deposits. Overall, a nice example with an exceptional patina which is also an excellent mark of authenticity. This piece is also solidly mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. Collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1393847
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,875.00
This mint quality piece is a very large Greek "Messapian" column krater that dates circa 4th century B.C., and is approximately 14.7 inches high, by 13.2 inches wide from handle to handle. This large-scale piece in intact with no repair and/or restoration, and is in it's natural mint quality "as found" condition. This piece has a dark brown body glaze with cream colored highlights, and has an attractive wave pattern seen on the upper shoulder. In addition, this large-scale piece has two lines seen on the lower body above the raised footed base, and triangular cream and dark brown patterns seen on the upper flat handle rims. This piece is a much better example than what is normally seen, as the dark brown body glaze seen on the majority of these "Messapian" pieces is normally worn away. The reason for this is that the dark brown body glaze is usually very thin, as it was generally applied simply as a "wash type" glaze. However, the dark brown body glaze seen on this exceptional example is somewhat thicker, and the overall condition of this piece is also better than most ceramics attributed to this culture. The "Messapian" culture was also a native Greek culture from southern Italy, and their vessels were largely derived from imported Attic models", as cited by A.D. Trendall in "The Art of South Italy: Vases from Magna Graecia", Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, 1982, p. 18. This piece also has some spotty white calcite deposits, and are especially thicker under the raised footed base, and in addition, the piece offered here is also likely a votive example, and this may also explain it's mint quality condition. Pottery classified as "Messapian" also refers to native and/or non-Greek pottery from southern Italy, along with the "Peucetian" and "Daunian" types, but this classification is a bit of a misnomer, as it is probable that "Messapian" ceramics were produced by Greek artists for the local non-Greek populace. This may also explain why this type of large-scale "Messapian" piece is x-rare, and is seldom seen on the market. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, and is an exceptional decorative object. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date,culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1360699
Apolonia Ancient Art
$965.00
This rare coin is a Greek silver drachm from the Epirote Republic, and dates circa 234-168 B.C. This coin is superb grade (EF+/EF+) condition, weighs 4.8 grams, and is approximately 22 mm in diameter. This coin also has a large flan, and is a well centered example. This coin has on the obverse: a detailed and laureate bust of Zeus facing right, and three separate monograms seen behind and below the bust. The reverse has: a standing eagle on a thunderbolt facing right, with the legend ADEI before, and PUTAN behind, all within a laurel wreath that is seen framing the border. The monograms seen on the obverse may refer the the magistrate that minted this coin and/or the name of the current ruler of the Epirote Republic. The reverse legend also refers to the Epirote Republic as well, and this coin was likely minted in the sacred site of Dodona. Another analogous example of this rare coin type was sold by Nomos AG in Zurich, Switzerland, Oct. 2015, no. 85. (Estimate 500 CHF, 2200 CHF realized. EF/EF- grade. See attached photo.) References: Franke, Epirus, Series 29 (var.); SNG Cop 114. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1341167
Apolonia Ancient Art
$8,675.00
This superb Olmec seated figurine dates to the Intermediate Olmec Period, circa 900-600 B.C., and is approximately 3.6 inches high, by 1.9 inches wide, by 1.75 inches deep. This piece is intact, with no repair/restoration, and was carved from a light to dark green serpentine stone. This piece also has some spotty light black to dark green dotted inclusions seen within the stone, and a light brown patina seen in the deep recesses of the figurine. There is also some spotty minute root marking, and some faint traces of red cinnabar. This piece likely depicts a shaman seen in the seated position, and it is a complete carved figure that is finished in the round. This attractive piece also sits upright without falling over, as this piece also has a flat to slightly outward curved underside that provides a solid base. The arms and hands are seen resting on the knees of the crossed legs, and the oval shaped head is seen slightly tilted to the left. The entire body appears to be nude, as are most Olmec figurines of this type, and the facial expression also features the typical downward turned thick lips and horizontal deep carved eyes. The mouth design with the thick lips that are downturned, is also known as the "Olmec jaguar mouth", and is the prominent design feature of the piece offered here. The "jaguar mouth" seen on this piece is also thrust forward towards the viewer, and was an intentional design of the artist, and one can easily see this design feature as one looks at this figurine from the side in profile. The slight tilt of the head also accentuates the design of the face, and gives this piece a great deal of expression. The wide nose has two small bow drilled holes for the nostrils, and in addition, there are two bow drilled holes seen at each end of each eye. The overall face design is one that is seen as a "transformation" type face, from human to jaguar, or vice-versa. The seated and/or kneeling pose of this figurine is also known as the "transformation shaman pose", which is associated with Olmec figurines that are thought to depict a shaman in various stages of transformation from human to jaguar, and vice-versa. (See "The Olmec World: Ritual and Rulership", by F. Kent Reilly III, Princeton University, Abrams Pub., 1995, pp. 27-45.) The superb Olmec figurine offered here is an excellent example of Olmec "transformational" type art, and is seldom offered on the market in this condition. This piece also has an extensive authentication examination report from Stoetzer, Inc., Miami, FL., report #010514.1, dated 02/09/2014; and was also authenticated by Robert Sonin, New York, c/o Arte Primitivo, New York. Ex: Edmund Budde Collection, circa 1950's. Ex: Arte Primitivo, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including the authentication examination report noted above.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Prehistorical item #1402347
Apolonia Ancient Art
$685.00
This intact and attractive piece is an Apulian-Gnathian pelike that dates to the late 4th century B.C., and is approximately 4.7 inches high. This piece has a thin black glaze with attractive light gray burnishing, and is an intact example with no repair and/or restoration. This vessel also has additional and detailed fine body molding seen at the upper rim, and above the ring base on the lower body of the vessel. There are added incised decorative tendril vines that run around the upper shoulder, and these incised elements are also seen on the neck of the vessel. There are also added white painted vine leaves and grape clusters, although faded, that are seen on this vessel as well. This piece has some minute root marking, and some light brown mineral deposits which also add to this vessel's eye appeal. A nice intact piece with fine body molding, and likely made by an accomplished potter. Ex: Hans Piehler collection, Germany, circa 1940's-1960's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1356856
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This mint quality piece is a Greek Boeotian black glazed kantharos that dates circa 450-425 B.C. This large piece is approximately 10 inches high, by 7.75 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece has a lustrous vibrant black glaze seen both on the inner and outer surfaces of this vessel, and features added white decorative elements that are seen running around the vessel. These prominent decorative elements are ivy leaf tendrils, along with a chevron pattern that is seen below. The chevron pattern is also a rare decorative element, and this piece is one of the few known examples that features this element. This piece also has distinctive looped "strap handles" that raise gracefully above the main body of the vessel, and a raised "stem base". This large vessel was likely used for holding wine, and was used for drinking and/or for pouring libations in a religious ceremony. The ivy leaf decorative elements seen on this piece are also tied to Dionysus, who was the Greek god of wine and revelry. In addition, this type of vessel is often portrayed on painted pottery being held by Satyrs, who were bestial goat-men that were associated with drinking and Dionysian festivals. This piece is in superb to mint quality condition, and has no noticeable repair/restoration. There are some minute stress cracks seen on the strap handles, but these are very minor and are difficult to see, and this vessel is a solid example which can be held today. There is also some spotty white calcite deposits seen mostly on the inner surfaces, and the entire piece has a beautiful even lustrous black glaze. Most vessels of this type usually have a great deal of repair/restoration, and significant losses to the white painted decorative elements, but this is not the case with this exceptional and intact example, and this piece is also one of the best recorded examples. This piece is also analogous to the example found in the Metropolitan Museum in New York, no. 1993.197. Another piece of this type, size, and condition was sold in Christie's Antiquities, London, oct. 2011, no. 71. (3,000.00-5,000.00 Pound estimates, 6,000.00 realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1340042
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This complete piece is a Greek silver neck section for a vessel, and dates circa 5th-4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 4 inches diameter, by 2.8 inches high. This piece is slightly oval in shape, and has slightly sloping sides. This piece has exceptional workmanship, and was hammered into shape from one solid sheet of silver. In addition, this piece has an extremely detailed beaded lip border, with minute beading which only a skilled artist could have produced. This piece was made as a section for a large silver vessel such as a hydria, or a stamnos, and both of these vessel types had an extended neck that reached upwards from the main body of the vessel, along with handles that were attached to the main body of the vessel. This pieced may also have been produced for fitting into a ceramic vessel body, and although this is rare, it is a known type of use. This piece likely was never used, and could have been made as a votive type use, and was never intended for use in real life. This piece also could have been produced for use into a silver vessel at a later time, as was perhaps lost in the production process, or became war booty that was hoarded away. Whatever the case, this piece is a rare example as a section such as this, and is an excellent case study as to how a complete silver vessel could have been produced. This piece also appears to be a complete neck section, with no apparent cut marks showing in the lower edge, although there is some lower edge roughness that is to be expected. This piece also has an attractive dark to light gray patina, and there are some sections that have spotty dark to light black mineral deposits, along with some additional minute mineralization and root marking. This type of piece is seldom seen on the market, and is an exceptional example for the type. This piece also sits on a custom metal and Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Private New Jersey collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1268923
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This scarce and mint quality piece is a Greek Xenon culture plate that dates circa 350-325 B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 9 inches in diameter, by 2.4 inches high. This piece has a multi-iridescent deep black glaze, dark red/orange, and white colors. This piece is also mint quality with no repair/restoration, has some spotty white calcite deposits, minute root marking, and has a great deal of eye appeal. This piece is a footed plate that has a raised ring foot, and a deep bowl. The inner center of this beautiful piece has a silhouette of a young woman's bust that is facing left, and there is a floral element seen below. There is an ivy-leaf pattern seen running around the central bust, along with decorative "cross pattern" and "line/dotted pattern" bands that are seen running around the outer section of the overall painted design. The female bust likely represents Demeter and/or Persephone, and represents the change of the seasons, and/or the renewal of life which this represents. The female goddess is also seen wearing a sakkos with a hair tie, and the profile of her face shows a high degree of art, as this profile conveys an eternally young woman. This piece also has two holes in the ring base which allowed this piece to be hung in a private home or shrine, and this piece may also have been a votive piece that was placed in the tomb. The artistic style of this piece is analogous to the Xenon type culture pieces that also have a central subject that was depicted in silhouette form. These Greek Xenon culture pieces usually depict a standing swan or a running dog or hare, and most have an ivy leaf pattern, with a design rendered in a red/orange color over a deep black glaze as the piece offered here. There are very few Xenon examples that have the woman's bust of a goddess, and most Xenon vessels are designed as a kylix or a small kantharos cup. The Greek Xenon culture is native to southern Italy, and their culture was derived from mainland Greece. This piece also comes with a Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Private German collection circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1184568
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This superb vessel is a Moche fineline ceramic that dates circa 450-600 A.D., Moche IV-V periods. This vibrant piece is approximately 12.2 inches high by 6.5 inches in diameter, and is in intact condition with bright dark red and cream colors. This complete piece has no repair/restoration, some attractive light brown burnishing with some minute spotty light brown mineral deposits. There is a small probe hole seen near the base on one side which is also commonly seen on many authentic Moche ceramics. This piece also has a flat bottom and two lively running serpent warriors facing left, which are carrying shields/maces in an extended arm, and are seen with a bended extended leg. The fineline painting, along with the "wave motifs" seen on the raised stirrup, are painted in a vibrant dark red slip. This piece is one of only a few recorded examples that was likely painted by the same hand of a singular master painter, and is very analogous to the example seen in the Sackler collection. (See "Art of the Andes: Pre-Columbian Sculptured and Painted Ceramics from the Arthur M. Sackler Collections", Arthur M. Sackler Foundation Pub., Washington, D.C., p. 181, no. 58. See attached photo.) These serpent warrior examples are also thought to have been found in one geographic location, i.e Chimbote in the Santa Valley, and this theory also supports the premise that this piece was painted by an individual master painter. (This theory is also mentioned by Paul Clifford in the Sackler reference noted above.) The Sackler example and the superb example offered here, both show a coiled serpent body which conveys movement, a lively open mouth, dotted eye, and dark red trefoil body spots. This serpent warrior anthropomorphic composition conveys not only movement, but also a lively expression, which in combination makes this piece a master Moche composition. The anthropomorphic running serpent warriors composition also is a representation seen within the Moche spirit world, and may represnt the resurrection of a Moche warrior. This piece is a rare to scarce type, and is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Dr. Klaus Maria collection, circa 1980-2012. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL test document from Gutachten Lab, no. 3821027., dated Nov. 27th, 1982, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1323656
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This attractive Greek silver triobol was minted in Phokis in central Greece during the Classical Period, circa 460-430 B.C. This coin weighs 3.0 gms, has a dark gray patina, and is in extremely fine condition (EF/EF). The obverse of this interesting coin has a facing bull, and the reverse features the bust of Artemis facing right, with her hair bound with a fillet. The face of this young goddess also has a pleasing smile that is also designed with an earlier "Archaic Period" artistic style. There are four letters seen around the bust of this young goddess, with each letter seen at each corner of the incuse square, and these letters represent the name of "Phokis". The facing bull seen on the obverse may also represent a sacrificial bull, and has very high relief. The coin offered here is a superb example for the type, as most of these examples are found in Very Fine grade (VF), and have a great deal of wear. References: Sear 2348. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1367981
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This intact and dainty Greek Boeotian Greek kylix dates circa 400-375 B.C., and is approximately 2.6 inches high, by 8.25 inches wide from handle to handle. This pleasing little piece has black, brown, and dark orange colors which follows the traditional fabric of ancient Greek Attic and Boeotian ceramics for the period. This piece has olive sprigs painted around the outer body of the piece that have brown stems and black olives. There is also a black band above the stemmed base, and a black band under the flat base. The interior of the bowl has a wide outer black band with two circles and a dotted center. The overall shape is very esoteric and is an extremely fine example for the period. This piece is completely intact, and is in superb to mint condition with only some minute stress cracks seen at the base of one of the handles. This piece also has some spotty white calcite deposits, and has a high degree of eye appeal. (Another analogous piece of this type was offered by Charles Ede Limited, Catalog 176, 2005, no. 47. See attached photo.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1338092
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This rare to extremely rare piece is a Greek Apulian-Gnathia alabastron that dates circa 350-330 B.C., and is approximately 7.6 inches high. This type of vessel is also referred to as an aryballos, but due to its cylindrical shape, it is classified as an alabastron. This piece is extremely rare as it follows the slightly earlier Greek Apulian types in form, but it also combines the extremely rich floral decorations that are seen on the subsequent Greek Gnathian type ceramics. This piece is therefore classified as an Apulian-Gnathian type of ceramic, and the high degree of art and form for this culture makes it an extremely rare to rare example. This piece has a beautiful and detailed young woman, likely Persephone, that is seen emerging from the floral elements that are seen rinsing up from the ground. For the ancient Greeks, Persephone represented the change of seasons and eternal life, as she returned from the underworld every spring to regenerate the earth. The detail of Persephone, and the floral elements seen to the right and left of the bust seen on this vessel are exquisite. This piece may also be attributed to the "Toledo Painter", who was one of the more accomplished painters for the period who utilized extensive floral elements and detailed faces as seen on this beautiful piece. This piece also has a flat designed opening, which also was an aid in controlling the flow of precious oil. This piece has a lustrous black glaze, and vibrant white, yellow, and light brown colors. The vibrant white color of the bust of Persephone also pops out from the black background, and can easily be seen from a great distance. This piece is also intact with no repair and/or restoration, and is in mint condition. There are some spotty light white calcite deposits seen in various sections, and the black glaze is deep and even over the entire piece. This piece also easily stands by itself, and is a remarkable and beautiful example of an ancient Greek ceramic. (For the type see "The Art of South Italy: Vases from Magna Graecia by Margaret Mayo, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, 1982, nos. 55-56 and 128-129.) Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva, circa 1990's. Ex: Private Swiss collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1234584
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This extremely rare piece is a Moche "open topped" jar that dates, Moche V Period, circa 500-700 A.D. This piece is approximately 5.6 inches high, by 5.25 inches wide at the base. This interesting piece is a polychrome black-ware vessel, and has a nice glossy black glazed surface with some attractive dark brown burnishing. This type of Moche "portrait vessel", is generally seen within the Moche V Period, and is often associated with "open topped" vessels with an extended neck, as is seen with this vessel. The extremely rare piece offered here is intact, has some spotty mineralization, and some attractive minute root marking. This piece shows a man with a facial deformity, as the face is seen caved in with a diminutive nose and an extended lower jaw. The man is also seen looking straight ahead with what appears to be a forlorn facial expression. This piece was collected circa 1960's by Dr. Ernst J. Fisher, who collected Moche art/ceramics that were medical related, and often depicted individuals with diseases and/or deformities. The Moche were known for their realistic ceramic portraiture of individuals, and the vessel seen here is a prime example of their skill for realism in portraiture, and it is likely that this piece depicted an actual individual. The most common view of the deformed face of the individual depicted here, is that this deformity was the result of a disease such as Mucocutaneous Leishmaniasis (ML), and this disease is found today in Bolivia, Brazil, and Peru. ML is contracted from a sand fly bite, and subsequently, ML symptoms include painful nodules inside the nose, perforation of the nasal septum, and enlargement of the nose and lips. Untreated, the disease leads to ulcerated lesions and scarring and tissue destruction predominately in the face and extremities which can be disfiguring (See MedicineNet.com for more information regarding this disease.) This piece likely displays the disease noted above, as the final stage of this disease is a collapse of the nasal septum followed by death. This piece may also have been a votive type piece, as this disease was regarded by the Moche as a sacred sign of the Gods, and consequently, this type of "portrait vessel" is extremely rare. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is included for the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : European Medieval : Pre AD 1000 item #1339132
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This nice piece is a Viking bronze pendant that dates circa 9th-10th century A.D. This piece is approximately 1.7 inches high, and the round plaque section is approximately 1.2 inches in diameter. This piece was made from two sections, one being the flat round plaque, and the other, is the strap loop that has a single rivet securing it to the main body of the piece. The round plaque has a hammered dotted border, and a hammered Christian Byzantine type cross design that has a round center. This round center may also double as a solar symbol, and the cross design also has an additional smaller cross patterns seen at the end of all four points. The design of this Christian cross, seen on this pendant, may also be one of the earliest Christian cross examples seen on a Viking culture type piece. The cross design also has remains of a light green to cream colored enamel, and this shows well against the dark green patina that this piece has. This piece is an complete exceptional example for the type, and is not often seen on the market in this superb condition. This piece is solid, and can easily be worn today. This piece also hangs on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private Denmark collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1243639
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This massive and extremely rare piece is a Greek iron sarissa spear head that dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 4th century B.C., and is approximately 22.5 inches long by 2 inches wide at the blades mid point. This piece is intact, and is in superb condition with a hardened earthen over glaze which has helped to preserve this extremely rare iron weapon. The metal seen on this piece is for the most part very compact with very little flaking, and is in very stable and solid condition. The condition of this piece is remarkable, given the fact that it is made from iron, and not bronze. This piece is all the more remarkable, in that it has survived intact after sustaining substantial battle damage. This battle damage can be seen with the two bends in the blade, and a small part of the end of the shank which was moved out from the blow to the piece. The blow to the piece traveled from the tip end to the shank, and did not shatter the weapon, as the blow appears to have been on the side of the blade, thus causing the two bends in the blade and the small section at the end of the shank to move out and expand. This piece was likely carried by an infrantryman, and was fitted to a wooded shaft about 12-15 feet long. This heavy lance was carried with two hands, and is known as a "sarissa". This type of weapon was also developed by Philip II, who was the father of Alexander the Great, and was king of Macedonia circa 359-336 B.C. His military genius transformed his army with many innovative weapons and battle tactics, and the weapon offered here was one such weapon. The finest weapons during the Hellenistic period were iron, rather than bronze, and were forged and hand beaten into shape. These iron weapons were extremely sharp and durable, and iron swords from this period could easily take off a mans arm at the shoulder, and penetrate bronze shields. The fact that the piece offered here did not shatter during battle proves that this piece was hammered again, and again, to give it strength and durability. (For the Hellenistic Greek weapon types see "Greece and Rome at War", by Peter Connolly, United Kingdom, 1998.) This piece is extremely rare and is seldom seen in this condition on today's market. This piece comes with a custom metal stand and stands upright. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1339482
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This scarce piece is a Moche ceramic finial in the form of a moving snake, and dates circa 100-300 A.D. This piece is approximately 10.1 inches long, by 2.8 inches wide for the width of the head. This powerful piece has a nice dark to light gray polychrome glaze, with some attractive dark brown to black burnishing. There is also some spotty dark black mineral deposits, and this piece is intact with no apparent repair/restoration. This powerful piece displays a snake in the act of coiling for a strike, and one can see the open mouth with the bared teeth. The head is very detailed with some incised linear markings, refined raised eyes, and a well-defined boney head. The overall piece looks very realistic, and this is an artistic style hallmark of Moche ceramics. The snake closely resembles an anaconda or a boa with the flat nose and open and raised eye design. This piece was also made from molds, and one other analogous example of this type was on the market several years ago, and this piece may have been made as a pair for a bier or as a support for a canopy. Another theory is that this piece was made for a wooden ceremonial wooden staff, and the snake for the Moche shaman, was thought to demonstrate his power by controlling opposing forces in the supernatural world, and this in turn, would allow the shaman to become a living god able to cast spells, heal, and foretell the future. For this discussion relative to the powers of Moche shaman see: "Moche Art of Peru" by Christopher Donnan, University of California Press, 1978, p. 139. This "power-type" piece has a great deal of eye appeal, as it really looks alive, and it sits somewhat upright on a custom metal stand. Ex: Dr. Baker collection, NM, circa 1980's. Ex: Splendors of The World, HI, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1274546
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This scarce and beautiful piece is a Greco-Scythian gold rosette plaque that dates to the 5th-4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 2.1 inches in diameter, by .2 inches high at the raised center, and is a large example for the type. This gold rosette has a dotted border, with eight round floral pedal designs that run around the central element of the piece. This central element is a green glass inlay that is supported by a raised gold band. There is also an additional dotted decorative band the runs around the central glass inlay. This piece was also hand punched into a mold, thus forming the raised designs that are seen on the front side of this striking piece. There is also a minute centering central dot seen on the back side, which is a Greek convention of art during the 4th century B.C. This complete and intact piece also has some black mineral deposits where this piece likely attached to a garment that may have been votive. There are also minute black and dark brown spotty mineral deposits, along with minute root marks that are seen in various sections of the piece. This piece is also not thin gold sheeting, and is solid with some tensile strength, and this is an indication that this is not solely a votive type piece, and may have been worn on special occasions as well. This piece is a floral design with the raised central green glass element, and the green glass likely represents the center of a flower. This piece is also likely from the Black Sea region, and is analogous to gold plaques that have been found there that have floral designs. (See attached photo of an analogous Greco-Scythian floral rosette that was found near ancient Kerch, south of the Sea of Azov. This piece is approximately the same size as the piece offered here. This piece was published in "The Splendor of Scythian Art" by M.I. Artamonov, New York, 1969, no. 149.) These floral designs can be explained by the Greek Eleusinian cult that flourished in the Black Sea region, and the worship of Demeter and Persephone which represented the "change of the seasons" and "birth and rebirth", and these concepts were also associated with the growth of flowers and agriculture. The scarce to rare piece offered here is seldom seen on the market and has great eye appeal, as this piece has a brilliant color. This piece can also be worn today, as it is a durable solid example, and it can easily be built into a pendant or necklace. This piece also has a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private French collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certity that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1333494
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This little gem is a Greek Attic black-glazed kantharos that dates circa 350-325 B.C. This piece is approximately 2.4 inches high, by 4.6 inches wide from handle to handle. This charming piece is intact, and is in mint quality condition with no repair/restoration. The lustrous black glaze is even around the vessel, and is seen both on the inner and outer surfaces. This piece has a "flat handled" design, and these handles have spurred edges, a looping design, and connect to the main body of the vessel. This piece sits on a torus foot, and there is no reserve underneath, as this piece is entirely covered in a black glaze. This dainty piece was also designed to imitate silver vessels of this type. This type of Attic black-glazed ceramic is also scarce to rare on the market, as it is a rare form. This piece has some spotty white calcite deposits, and a multi-colored iridescent patina. (Another analogous vessel of this type was offered by Charles Ede Limited, London, 2010, Catalog 182, no. 35 for 900.00 pounds.) For the type see, B. Sparkes and L. Talcott, "The Athenian Agora, Vol. XII, Black and Plain Pottery", Princeton, 1970, no. 701, fig. 7. Ex: Private U.K collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv. #091613-05. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: