Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1304124
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This interesting piece is a silver Greco-European "spectacle fibula" that dates to the Geometric Period, circa 8th-7th century B.C. This piece is approximately 2.4 inches long, by 1.4 inches high, and is intact with no repair/restoration. This piece was made from one hammered strand of silver, and was made by creating a wire spiral that begins and ends at the center of each spiral. This piece is also very solid, as the diameter of the silver strand is about 1/16 inch on the average. The area between both spirals forms a clip that likely held rolls of hair in place, so this piece served as a functional, as well as a decorative type of piece. This piece has an attractive light gray patina, along with some minute spotty dark green mineral deposits seen mostly on "Side B" of the piece. (An analogous example was offered in Bonham's Antiquities, London, Oct. 2012, no. 218, 500-600 Pound estimates.) Silver examples of this type are relatively scarce on the market, especially in the intact condition offered here. This piece hangs on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1333281
Apolonia Ancient Art
$18,500.00
These seven extremely rare Graeco-Thracian silver phalerae date to the Hellenistic Period, circa 2nd-1st century B.C., and are approximately 4.3 inches in diameter for the larger phalera, and 2.25 inches in diameter for the other six phalerae. All seven phalerae are hand beaten from silver, and all have various degrees of gold gilt over the front surfaces. The largest phalera resembles a small bowl, and was hand beaten over a mold which formed the design seen in the center of the piece. This central design element resembles a "swastika", and perhaps this is the symbol this piece was meant to portray, but more likely, this symbol may also be a depiction of a "pinwheel" that spun in the wind. This "pinwheel" has a central dot or pin that supports the "four flaring bands" that are seen attached at the center. This "pinwheel" symbol was known to the ancient Greeks as a "strovilos" symbol, meaning "whirlwind", and is also a prominent symbol seen primarily on ancient bronze coins, and extremely rare silver coins that date circa 185-168 B.C. These coins are attributed to the Macedonian rulers Philip V and Perseus, and depict a Macedonian shield on the obverse with the "pinwheel" symbol seen at the center. (For the coin types see "SNG Ashmolean Museum Oxford, Vol. V, Part III, Macedonia", 1976, Nos. 3282-3288. Nos. 3282-3283 depict the "four flaring band" symbol, and nos. 3284-3288 depict the "six flaring band" symbol. See attached photo.) The silver phalerae offered here may have attached to a shield as portrayed in the coins noted above, or may have been attached to a leather type cuirass. The six nearly identical smaller phalerae would suggest this, as they all have two attachment pins that are flattened on the front and back sides. The clearance for these attachment pins on the backside suggests that these pieces were attached to a leather liner for a cuirass, rather than inserted into a shield that perhaps had a wooden core, but it is also quite possible that that these six phalerae were attached to a thin bronze cover of a shield that had a wooden core. The larger phalera with the "pinwheel" symbol has four attachment holes, two seen at the top and bottom, and this would allow for easy attachment to a shield with a wooden core. This piece may have also served as the central roundel of a chest cuirass as well. Whatever the case, these extremely rare pieces definitely had a military application, and are seldom seen on the market, as these pieces were made for a wealthy warrior of high status. The smaller phalerae support this theory, as they are very detailed and were hand beaten into shape. They are also individually detailed with multiple minute punch marks that defined the outer sculpted design. Within this outer sculpted design is a symbol at the center that is comprised with what looks to be a "cluster" of animal heads facing outwards. Each one of the heads have a snout, eyes, and two ears which are shared with each of the other individual heads. The overall rounded "cluster" design also resembles a flower as seen from above, and this design may have had multiple meanings and representations. The designs seen on all of the phalerae are also extremely rare relative to ancient Greek art, and may have been a unique symbol that perhaps distinguished the warrior who wore these phalerae. All of these pieces have dark brown/black deposits in various degrees seen over the silver and gold gilt, and the silver with little gold gilt and deposits also has a beautiful blue black patina. All of these pieces are intact, with two of the smaller phalerae having some stress cracks, and overall, these pieces are in exceptional condition. For the type see, "Thracian Art Treasures", by Ivan Venedikov and Todor Gerassimov, Caxton Pub., London, 1975, nos. 351-353. These pieces are also attached to a custom Plexiglas display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private Krefield, Germany collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1323767
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This extremely fine coin is a silver drachm that was minted shortly after the death of Alexander the Great circa 323 B.C. This coin was likely minted circa 323-310 B.C. in Colophon, or possibly Abydus, and the identifying mint mark is the Macedonian royal star burst symbol that is seen on the reverse, at the front of the seated Zeus. This coin is in extremely fine condition (EF+/EF), and is approximately 20mm in diameter, weighs 4.3 gms (Attic Weight Standard), and has a very light gray patina. The obverse features a bust of Herakles facing right, and is seen wearing a lion's skin headdress. The portrait seen here is also a very close likeness of Alexander the Great, and was likely intended to portray both Herakles and Alexander. The reverse features a seated Zeus, who is seen holding a standing eagle which was a messenger of the gods. The Macedonian star burst symbol is seen at the front of the seated Zeus, and the name (Philip) in Greek lettering is seen behind. The flan of this attractive piece is very large, and one can see the edge line of the die that runs around the outer edge of the obverse. The flan of this piece is larger than what one normally sees relative to this issue, and this coin also has perfect centering, along with extremely high relief on the obverse. The large flan size alone makes this coin a superb example, and is not often seen on the market. In addition, the seated Zeus does not have crossed legs and has an analogous design as the specimens attributed to Abydus show, and the Macedonian royal star is often seen on examples attributed to Colophon, according to Martin Price. References: This extremely rare coin has an example listed in Price, no. P113, and is listed as "minted circa 323-280 B.C.", and as "Uncertain of Western Asia Minor". It may also be that this rare issue may have been minted in Pergamon, shortly after the death of Alexander the Great, as this was the center of the so-called "Royalist" faction that supported the royal family after the death of Alexander. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1278900
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This rare Roman bronze figurine is a standing gladiator that dates circa 1st-early 2nd century A.D. This bronze figurine is approximately 3.4 inches high, and is mounted on a custom display stand. This animated figurine is a standing gladiator, who is seen raising his left arm to the brim of his helmet, and has his left leg raised as if it is resting on his adversary. His raised left arm may be a signal either to spare or kill his adversary who is perhaps laying injured on the ground. The animated pose of the gladiator depicted here, with his raised arm and hand signal, is scarce to rare relative to Roman bronze gladiator figurines of this type, and is seldom seen on the market. The gladiator depicted here is also a "Murmillo" type, as he is seen wearing a "Cassis Crista", which is a broad-rimmed helmet based on the prior Greek Boeotian type, and the large helmet seen here has an enclosed double face visor, a forward raised crested plume, rounded eye visors, and decorative minute fish scale elements that are seen on the outer bowl. The helmet also has some minute details showing the double opening for the face visor, and this helmet is classified as the "Pompeii G Type", which is rarely seen on Roman bronze gladiatorial figurines as the more common "Berlin G Type". Early gladiatorial helmets, including the ones found at Pompeii, had round eye apertures for the eyes, and were often screened with removable round or semi-circular grating plates, and in addition, the visor grating also consisted of two halves that joined at the front, forming a vertical rib as seen on the exceptional example offered here. The helmet details noted above, relative to the "Pompeii G Type", are seldom seen on Roman bronzes of this type, and is another feature that makes this piece a very desirable example. This figurine is also seen wearing an arm guard on his right arm which is known as a "Manica", which was usually made of thick cotton quilt, leather, and some metal alloys. This gladiator is also seen holding a short sword in his right hand known as a "Gladius", and protective greaves on both shins. In addition, his right leg is seen wrapped with a protective covering which was used to kick at his adversary, and he is wearing a wide leather belt known as a "Balteus". This figurine also appears to be bare chested as well. There is also a palm branch "Palma" seen on his back side, and this was an award for victory in the arena. On receiving his awards, the gladiator made a lap of honor around the arena, waving his palm branch. (See "Gladiator: Rome's Bloody Spectacle" by Konstantin Nossov, Osprey Pub., United Kingdom, 2009.) The name "Murmillo" is derived from "Mormylos", meaning "seafish", and is sometimes spelled "Myrmillo". This name also alludes to the fish-scale design seen on the outer bowl of the helmet seen here. The "Murmillo" usually fought the "Thraex" or the "Hoplomachus", with whom he shared some of the equipment (notibly the arm guards, the all-enclosing helmet, and the dangerous "Gladius" short sword). The "Murmillo" fighting style was best suited for a man with large muscular arms and strong heavy shoulders that were needed to carry the weight of his shield and sword. Men who played the "Murmillo" were usually shorter and more muscular than most gladiators. The "Murmillo" depended on his strength and endurance to survive the battle against foes who were lighter armed and were suited for attacking. The figurine seen here also appears to be a short, muscular individual. The piece offered here is complete, save for the lower feet that are broken off, and this may have been done as this piece may have been a votive offering, and the breaking of the lower feet would keep the magic and spirit of the figurine in the grave. There also appears to be a shield hanging under the left arm, and a small fragment of this is missing. Overall, the condition of this piece is superb, and has nice detail with a nice even dark green patina, with minute spotty red highlights. (An analogous piece, without the minute detail that the piece offered here displays, was offered in Christie's Antiquities, London, Oct. 2003, lot. 13. Approximately 3.1 inches high, $3,400.00-$5,100.00 estimates, $5,593.00 realized.) The piece offered here has also been mounted on a custom display stand, and is a rare type seldom seen on the market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1370666
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This superb Chimu silver offering bowl dates circa 1100-1350 A.D., and is approximately 7.4 inches long, by 4,75 inches wide, by 2.3 inches high. This attractive silver vessel was hammered from one single sheet of metal, and was formed into the oval shape seen here. This piece is also slightly thicker at the base, and graduates in thickness from the base to the thinner outer rim. The oval shape and size of this vessel is seen as early as 400 B.C., relative to ceramic vessels of the Olmec, and was a hand-held vessel used in ceremonies. In addition, this vessel has two added dimples, one on each side of the vessel, which also allowed one to easily hold this vessel with one hand. A third dimple was added to the base so that this piece could sit upright without falling over. There is also a punched decorative "cross hatch" design seen on the flat section of the outer rim, and this design is often seen on Chimu silver vessels. (See Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, Nov. 2006, no. 296, that shows a Chimu silver beaker with a "cross hatch" design on the upper rim.) The beautiful example offered here has some spotty black mineral deposits, and a dark gray patina with iridescent silver/gold highlights in sections of the vessel. The condition of this intact piece is superb to mint quality with no repair/restoration, and there are no small dents, cuts, or chips. Ex: Jean-Eugene Lions collection, Geneva, Switzerland, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1367981
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This intact and dainty Greek Boeotian Greek kylix dates circa 400-375 B.C., and is approximately 2.6 inches high, by 8.25 inches wide from handle to handle. This pleasing little piece has black, brown, and dark orange colors which follows the traditional fabric of ancient Greek Attic and Boeotian ceramics for the period. This piece has olive sprigs painted around the outer body of the piece that have brown stems and black olives. There is also a black band above the stemmed base, and a black band under the flat base. The interior of the bowl has a wide outer black band with two circles and a dotted center. The overall shape is very esoteric and is an extremely fine example for the period. This piece is completely intact, and is in superb to mint condition with only some minute stress cracks seen at the base of one of the handles. This piece also has some spotty white calcite deposits, and has a high degree of eye appeal. (Another analogous piece of this type was offered by Charles Ede Limited, Catalog 176, 2005, no. 47. See attached photo.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1306126
Apolonia Ancient Art
$985.00
These three Roman vessels are from the northern reaches of the empire, and date circa 3rd-early 4th century A.D. These three pieces are approximately 3.4, 3.5, and 4.5 inches high, and are all in flawless mint quality condition. These pieces are made from a tan terracotta, and have "strap designed" handles that are attached to the rim and main body of each vessel. There are some attractive spotty white calcite deposits and root marking seen on various sections of the vessels, and the bottom half of each vessel flares to a small and elegant round circular flat base. These esoteric designed pieces likely served as daily tableware vessels, and were likely used for wine and water. There are two cups with a single strap handle, and a larger three-handled storage vessel that may have held a grain product. These matching pieces were also produced in the Rhineland area, possibly in or near the Roman stronghold Trier, which was also a thriving ceramic production center. Ceramics of the type offered here were exported over a wide geographical region, and were popular in the western and northern reaches of the empire. The ceramics offered here are also very thin walled, and were produced with a very high firing temperature. This firing technique not only produced a fine ceramic that was very light, but also one that is very durable. Trier was also known for producing fine thin walled ceramics in antiquity, and the city was also the location where Constantine the Great established his summer residence, circa 306 A.D., and Trier subsequently became the capital of Rome's Western Empire. The pieces offered here have parallels that are classified as being circa 3rd century A.D., and are seen in "Pottery of the Roman Period. The Athenian Agora Vol. V.", by H.S. Robinson, Princeton, 1959, no. M191. These pieces are scarce on the market, as they are a matching set and are in near mint condition. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1990's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1378231
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This piece is an Egyptian wooden mummy mask that dates to the Late Period, circa 700-30 B.C. This wooden piece is approximately 8.3 inches high, by 5.3 inches wide, and is a solid example. This pleasing "two-part" piece has a nose attached to the main body of the piece with two wooden dowels, and there are six additional dowels that attached the mask to the coffin lid. Five of these dowels are still in place, and in addition, there is a single dowel seen below the chin that was used to attach the mask to an extended wooden beard. The eyes and eye brows were created with angular cuts, in addition to the upper wig. The face also was applied with a thick white gesso, and thick amounts of it can be seen in various sections of the face. This esoteric face also has a slight smile, and has a great deal of eye appeal. The backside of the mask is flat, as it was attached to the coffin lid. This piece is a superb example with it's sectional dowel construction, and likely was made for a young man. This attractive piece also comes with a custom display stand. Ex: Collection of Swanhild Castle, Brooklyn, New York, circa 1960's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #956245
Apolonia Ancient Art
$625.00
These three pieces are being offered as one lot, as they are made from the same light red/tan clay fabric, and have similar light tan earthern deposits that have minute root marking. These three intact pieces are all classified as being Greek Corinthian, and date circa mid 6th century B.C. The first piece is an aryballos, that is approximately 2.25 inches high. This petite piece has some dark brown design elements that are seen at the rounded base, and is in superb condition, save for some unobtrusive chips that are seen below the lip. The second piece is a thin walled skyphos, that is approximately 3.1 inches high by 6 inches wide handle to handle. This piece is also in superb condition, save for a minute chip at the base that may be from antiquity. The third piece is a exaleiptron, otherwise known as a "kothon", which was used as a funerary ritual vessel that contained aromatic oil. This piece is also in superb condition, save for a minute chip at the end of one of the two handle flares. This vessel has a low foot ring and has traces of geometric light brown painted line design under the earthern deposits. All three of the superb vessels offered here may have been used in a votive funerary ritual as well. All three of these pieces are in an intact "as found" condition, although they have little or no glaze with heavy tan earthen deposits. Corinthian vessels, such as the three examples offered here, were also exported throughout the ancient Greek world during the 6th century B.C., and competed for markets with ancient Greek Attic ceramics. An interesting group that is being offered as one lot. Ex: Arte Primitivo, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 2000's. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1372853
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This powerful piece is a seated Vicus/Early Mochica shaman lord that dates circa 400-200 B.C., Early Intermediate Period. This piece is approximately 9 inches high, by 6.3 inches wide from elbow to elbow. This powerful looking piece is a seated shaman/lord that is seen with crossed legs and his hands resting on each knee. His elbows are also extended outwards, which adds to the regal visual impact of this rare Andean ceramic. He is seen wearing a skull cap that extends down to the middle of his back and "barrel-designed" torso. He is also seen wearing thick bracelets, and appears to have nude arms and upper chest. There are also sacred "wave-pattern" facial tattoos, and large ears that have a small vent hole centered within each ear. The most distinct feature of this regal seated shaman/lord, is his single "dotted-designed" protruding right eye, which is also visually enhanced with his missing left eye. This piece also has very realistic facial features, and it may be that the missing eye was lost in battle, or that the entire face seen is one that is undergoing a state of "transformation", from the living to the spirit world, or vice-versa. This exceptional piece has a thick red and cream colored glaze, with some spotty black mineral deposits. This piece is also intact, save for a small filled connection hole at the back of the vessel, as this piece was the forepart of a two-chambered vessel. The back chamber may also have been ceremoniously broken away, as this piece may also have been a sacred ceremonial offering. This piece also foreshadows the early Mochica I Period vessels that have an analogous glaze, and is a rare transitional type piece. This piece not only has a very powerful spiritual presence, but is also an extremely rare type not often seen on the market. Ex: Dr. Ernst Fischer collection, Germany, circa 1980's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000. Published: Suddeutschen Zeitung, Jan. 2010. (Note: Additional documentation is included to the purchaser, including a TL authenticity lab test from Kotalla Lab, Germany, June 1991, no. 1391607, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1191053
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This scarce and mint quality Roman ring dates circa mid 1st century B.C., and is approximately ring size 6 to 6.5. This piece is bronze, and has a traces of silver gilt that was highly polished. This piece is of superb to mint condition, and has a nice dark brown/green patina with some silvered highlights. The flat face has deep carving, and this seal ring produces an impressed image that is seen in high relief. This impressed image is seen facing right when the ring is pressed into a material such as wax or a soft clay, and the image has very sharp detail which is the bust of a young woman. This image closely resembles that of a young Octavia Minor, who was the sister of Octavian/Augustus and the third wife of Marcus Antonius, whom she married afer the death of her first husband, Caius Marcellus, in 40 B.C. She was also instumental in bringing about the treaty of Tarentum in 37 B.C., when Antonius and Octavian agreed to renew the Triumvirate. She was essentially a noble, loyal, and kindly woman who even looked after her step-children in Rome even after Antonius had formally divorced her. The wearer of this ring likely was a supporter of the imperial family of Octavian/Augustus, and was also likely a young woman. The portrait bust seen here has very analogous features to the known portraits of Octavia Minor, and this includes hair that is seen rolled into a bun at the back, and is seen rolled on each side of the head. There is also a hair curl seen hanging down in front of the ear, and there is a small mouth with an aquiline type nose. The portraits of Octavia Minor also closely resemble those of Livia, Octavian/Augustus wife, whose earliest coiffures were the same as hers. (For a discription of the portrait type see "Roman Historical Portraits" by J.M.C. Toynbee, Thames and Hudson Pub., London, 1978, pp. 48-50.) It's quite possible that the young woman seen on this superb Roman ring may also have been created to represent both of the Imperial ladies noted above, and in turn, represented support for the Imperial family. This scarce to rare ring can be worn today, as it is very solid, and it is a very fine example of a Roman jewelry piece from the early Imperial period. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.). I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1295397
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This beautiful Greek coin is a silver drachm attributed to the mint and city of Larissa, and dates circa 400-380 B.C. This piece is approximately 20mm in diameter, weighs 6.15 g., and is in EF-/EF condition. This piece also has extremely high relief and the obverse features the beautiful facing head of the nymph Larissa; and the reverse shows a grazing horse standing right on a ground line, with Greek lettering below meaning "Larissa". There is also the minute lettering "AI" seen below the belly of the horse, and this represents the signature of the die artist. According to C. Lorber in "The Silver Facing Head Coins of Larissa", Early Classification, Type 3: "The artist 'AI' became the mint's chief engraver, displacing he who signed himself 'SIMO', and the present dies are among the finest in the entire series." The coin offered here is one of the earliest dies of the series, and the early dies of the series had the two artist signatures noted above. In addition, the flank of the standing horse has a brand that appears to be the Greek letter "X". This "X" brand is also one of the few known examples, and appears only on this particular reverse die. It is unknown as to the meaning of this brand, and as this coin was signed by the artist, there certainly has to be a meaning behind this symbol. The early series with the facing heads of the mint Larissa predating circa 380 B.C., are the most desirable among collectors, and have a high degree of art. The attractive facing head seen here is leaning to the left, as the right shoulder is raised, and the female image has flowing hair that appears to be moving with the wind. The artist was able to convey a great deal of movement on the obverse, and in contrast, a complete sense of calm is conveyed on the reverse with the standing and grazing horse. This coin type, along with the artist's signature, is also considered by many numismatists to be a masterpiece, not only within the series, but also for the period. An exceptional coin of great beauty which is now scarce on the market. C. Lorber, Early Classification, no. 20.2. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1990's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1254565
Apolonia Ancient Art
$765.00
This interesting piece is a Recuay culture standing warrior that dates to the Early Intermediate Period, circa 400 B.C.-300 A.D., and the Recuay culture was centered in the Northern Peruvian Highlands, Callejon de Huaylas Valley. This piece is approximately 5.8 inches high by 4.2 inches in diameter, and is in intact condition, save for some minor stress cracks that appear to be filled at the base. This piece was made with a "resist-decoration" technique, and is a thin-walled white/cream colored kaolin clay with red-orange, yellow, and black colored line-drawn highlights. This piece also has some attractive light brown burnishing, and some spotty black mineral deposits. This piece shows a very animated figure that appears to be a standing warrior, as he is seen wearing a helmet and probable body armor, which is built into the round and portly design of the main body of the vessel. This figure also appears to be holding some objects in each hand, and the object in his right hand may be a round fruit which he is seen lifting to his wide mouth. The artistic style of this piece is also very geometric in it's design, and the lower legs and feet of this warrior are also designed in high relief at the base of the vessel. This piece also has the typical single spout which is wide and funnel shaped, and is integrated in width and height relative to the head of the warrior, which makes it to be somewhat imperceptible at first glance. It is also likely that the Recuay were a satellite people of the Mochica, and perhaps were guardians of sacrificial llamas and were an elite group of warriors. The ceramic offered here may also have been designed with additional ceramics, which made up a group scene that was created as a ceremonial grave offering. (For the culture and the warrior-type ceramics, see A. Lapiner, "Pre-Columbian Art of South America", New York, 1976, pp. 167-169.) A scarce piece with nice eye appeal. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Metalwork : Pre AD 1000 item #1226590
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This powerful piece is a Chimu culture silver mask that dates circa Late Intermediate Period, 1000-1400 A.D. This piece is has a Lambayeque Valley, Peru, type of design, and is approximately 11.75 inches wide by 6 inches high by 1.2 inches in relief. This piece is also a large example for the type, and has silver with added copper metal plate. This piece also has a thin applied coat of original spotty red cinnabar than runs through the flat center section of the piece. This intact piece has a "box-type" nose construction, and is attached to the main body of the piece with folded over tabs. There are decorative small hand beaten rounded dot patterns, that are seen at each end of the ear sections, and these ear sections also show a rounded design which resemble ear spools. These main body of this piece is divided into three sections, and the middle section is the nose and "line-formed" mouth which is the focus of this piece, and the eyes seen in each of the two outer sections, frame the entire compact design of the face. On the back side of this piece, there are some textile remains seen between the main body of the piece and the "box-type" constructed nose section. This piece covered a "mummy-bundle" which was also wrapped in textiles, and this piece was likely wrapped around the face of the mummy along with additional textile wrapping. Depending on the status and wealth of the deceased, these Chimu masks could be of ceramic, of wood, or even cloth, but those of the most powerful were of gold and silver. This piece also has a dark gray patina, with several minute spotty black mineral deposits. Another analogous example of nearly the same size can be seen in Bonham's African, Oceanic, and Pre-Columbian Art, Nov.2013, no. 33. ($4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates, $11,875.00 realised.) This piece is also mounted within a black wooden shadow box, and clear Velcro tabs securely hold it into place which attaches this piece to the black backing. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #993691
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This impressive piece is a huge example of a Greek terracotta mother goddess. This piece dates from the Archaic Period, circa late 6th century-early 5th century B.C., and is an impressive 17 inches high. This attractive piece is intact, save for some minor repair at the base, and is 100% original. Given the extremely large size of this piece, this piece is in remarkable condition and it also stands by itself on its square base. This piece is also rare in this size, as the majority of Archaic period Greek terracottas of this type range from approximately 10-12 inches in height. This piece is also in "as found" condition, as it has a light gray earthen glaze that is layered over the light orange terracotta. This piece has a very lively face, as seen with a slight smile and large almond eyes, which are both hallmarks of "Archaic period" Greek art, and the overall effect is a face that is very serene. (For an "Archaic period" marble monument in the form of a sphinx, circa 550-525 B.C., with very analogous facial details to the terracotta offered here, see "Archaic Greek Art" by Gisela Richter, Oxford University Press, New York, 1949, p.76, fig. 121. This example was considered by Richter as having the best Greek Attic artistic style and "Attic grave monuments of the third quarter of the sixth century are among the finest extant.") The terracotta offered here may be an Attic type as well, and is also a type found on Samos. This type of archaic Greek standing goddess is seen holding a dove in her right hand, and is wearing a long pleated chiton. This piece may represent a votaress presenting an offering to Demeter or Persephone, and in this case the offering is a dove. This piece may also double as a votive offering itself, in addition as being an image of a votive standing mother goddess, and may be connected to reproduction and birth/rebirth. The design of this piece with one foot slightly placed in front of the other is also derived from Egyptian works of art. (For the type see R.A. Higgins, "Catalogue of the Terracottas in the Department of Greek and Roman Antiquities, British Museum, Vol I", London, 1954.) A custom black marble stand is included. Large Greek terracottas of this type are extremely rare to rare, especially in this superb condition, and are seldom seen on the market. Ex: Private Austrian collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1322070
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This flawless piece is a Greek red ware pyxis that dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 4th-early 3rd century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.85 inches in diameter at the lid and lower base, and 4 inches high. This flawless piece is in mint quality condition, and has no repair and/or restoration. Two-part Greek vessels of this type are scarce to rare in this mint condition, as the lid and base have thin edges that extend away from the main body of the piece. The lid fits very close to the supporting lower base, and lifts easily on and off the base. The lid also has a roundel seen at the top that may have had a bone, metal, or stone insert with a carved image. A nearly identical vessel of the same size with a terracotta image of a goddess, seen within the roundel at the top, was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, Vol. XXVI, no. 118. ($5,000.00 estimate. See attached photo.) The piece offered here also has some spotty light brown earthen, and minute black mineral deposits. A scarce vessel in this mint condition. Ex: Charles Ede collection, London, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1374395
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This complete and intact piece is a Greek terracotta of a standing Demeter that dates circa 5th century B.C. This piece is approximately 8.75 inches high, and is an intact and complete example that has no repair/restoration. This attractive piece was mold made from a light tan terracotta, and was designed with a square base and a circular vent hole seen at the back. This nice piece also has some light brown earthen deposits, has not been over cleaned, and is in it's natural "as found" condition. This piece represents Demeter, who is seen wearing a pleated chiton, along with a himation that is draped over her shoulders. She is also seen holding a piglet to her chest with both hands, and is standing with her left knee slightly forward. She has a slight smile, and has a very serene overall look, as she is seen simply standing and facing the viewer. This piece was also likely votive in nature, and also depicts the animal offering (piglet) that was offered in a religious ceremony to a shrine or a temple. This piece by itself may also have served as a votive offering substitute as well. (See Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2000. no. 84 for another analogous example of this type.) The piece offered here is scarce in this intact condition, has nice eye appeal, and is an excellent example for the type. This piece is also attached to a custom wooden display stand. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1378549
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This exceptional Roman silver denarius is attributed to Pescennius Niger, and dates circa 193-194 A.D. This piece is approximately 19mm wide, weighs 2.89 gms, and is in Good Extremely Fine condition, otherwise graded Superb, (EF+/EF+). This piece is also thought to have been minted in Antioch, and is apparently a unique set of dies. This coin is also thought to be the finest of just four recorded examples bearing this reverse type. The (Obv.) obverse features the wreathed and draped bust of Pescennius Niger facing right within a dotted border, and IMP CAES C PESC NIGER IVST AVG around. The (Rev.) reverse shows Niger standing left holding a globe and sword hilt, crowned by Victory standing left within a dotted border, and VICTORIAE AVG around. This coin is also extremely rare to unique, as the coinage of this ruler was meticulously recalled by Septimius Severus in 194 A.D. The portrait seen on this coin is also very realistic, and is superior to most numismatic images seen on this coinage. An exceptional example that is one of the finest recorded examples. References: CNG 69, June 2005, lot 1648 (Similar dies.); RIC-; BMC-; RSC-. Ex: Roma Numismatics, Auction IX, March 2015, no. 746. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1358352
Apolonia Ancient Art
$8,675.00
This exceptional Mayan plate has a great deal of eye appeal, and dates circa 600-700 A.D. This large example is approximately 12.75 inches in diameter, by 3.25 inches high, and is intact with no repair/restoration. This attractive piece has a polychrome glaze on the upper inner surfaces that is seen with very vibrant orange, black, white, and light red colors. This piece also has some attractive minute root marking and some spotty black mineral deposits. The bottom side of the plate is a light tan terracotta with three rounded legs with rattles within, and the "shoulder line" seen on the underside is very sharp and well defined. The top inner surface displays a stylized bust facing left of "God K", otherwise known as "K'awil", who is seen with an elongated nose, ear-flares, an elaborate smoking-mirror headdress, and a line-designed mouth. "God K" was one of the Mayan gods of greatest importance, and was associated with the natural elements linked to agricultural activities such as rain and thunder. The stylized bust is surrounded by four smoking scrolls that also refer to the four "cardinal directional points" that were sacred to the Maya. The entire bust design is also rendered with a stylized "circle-and-dot pattern" which also has filled colors within the circles, and this design type is of an artistic style that is associated with the Peten region. (For the design type, see a bowl published in: "Maya, Treasures of an Ancient Civilization", Abrams Pub., 1985, no. 122. See attached photo.) This piece also has a large black glyph band that frames the inner bust of "God K", and this contains glyphs that are associated with the "PSS" (Primary Standard Sequence) that was identified by Michael Coe. This glyph band was also painted by a very accomplished painter. Overall, this piece is an exceptional example of Mayan art that is also in superb to mint condition. Ex: Ferdinand Anton collection, Germany, circa 1959. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #987545
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This extremely rare piece is a Greek Apulian trefoil oinochoe that shows an expressive theatrical mask, which is seen in profile facing right, and dates circa 380-350 B.C. This piece is classified as a "Type II Oinochoe", otherwise known as a "Chous", and is approximately 4.6 inches high. This attractive piece is also intact, and is in superb to mint quality condition with no repair/restoration or overpaint. This extremely rare piece has also been attributed to the "Truro Painter", and has very vibrant colors, which are a glossy black, light red, and white. There are also some heavy white calcite deposits seen within the vessel, on the edge of the trefoil mouth, and on the bottom base ring. The detailed theatrical mask is seen centered within a light red frame which has a floral design at the bottom, and there are several attractive white dot highlights seen within this light red frame as well. The lively theatrical mask depicted on this piece is a type used by a character in a Greek comedy play known as a "phylax play", and this type of "phylax mask" was designed with bushy black hair, short black beard, open mouth, and copious facial wrinkles. This type of "phylax mask" was defined by Trendall as "Type B", and this type of mask was often produced by the "Truro Painter", circa 380-350 B.C., on Greek Apulian chous vessels of this type. Trendall also stated that the heads of the Truro Painter "often wear white head-bands", and the detailed theatrical "phylax mask" seen on the piece offered here also has a very prominent white head-band. (See A.D. Trendall, "Phlyax Vases", Second Edition, BICS Supplement 20, 1967. Another vessel of this type is seen in the Virginia Museum in Richmond, Virginia, no. 81.53.) The expressive theatrical "phylax mask" seen on the beautiful vessel offered here, and the Virginia Museum vessel noted above, are both designed as a singular depiction, and as such, is a subject type seldom seen on Greek Apulian vessels. In addition, the "phylax mask" seen here on this rare vessel is a sharp detailed example which is seldom seen on the market today. An analogous Apulian chous of this type was offered in Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2008, no.195. (Approximately 7.5 inches high, $5,000.00-$7,000.00 estimates, $12,500.00 realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Donna Jacobs Gallery, Birmingham, Michigan, circa 1980's. Ex: Robert Novak collection, St. Louis, MO. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1039437
Apolonia Ancient Art
$425.00
This flawless piece is an intact Greek olpe vessel that dates circa 4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 6.5 inches high by 3.25 inches in diameter. This esoteric piece has an attractive tan earthern glaze and is made from a light red clay. This piece has nice "as found" deposits, a flat bottom, and a single strap handle. The large open and round mouth was also designed to pour liquid very rapidly, which lends this vessel very well as a table vessel. Vessels of this type were widely produced in the ancient Greek world, and this vessel shape was also produced in bronze. In fact, our research reveals that bronze vessels of this type seem to be more common than the terracotta vessels of this type, and in addition, this type of terracotta vessel seen in this mint condition is scarce, as most examples have some degree of repair/restoration. This piece probably was used for everyday use and may also been a votive example, and the latter case is probably the case here, as this piece has no apparent wear from use. This piece probaly was used for water and/or wine. A nice example seldom seen in this condition. Ex: Bonhams Antiquities, London, April 2004, no. 343. Ex: Private Ill. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1363867
Apolonia Ancient Art
$985.00
This superb Greco-Roman bronze piece is an applique that is in the form of a theater mask, and dates to the late Hellenistic Period, circa 1st century B.C.-early 2nd century A.D. This piece is approximately 1.3 inches high, by 1.25 inches wide, by .8 inches in relief. This piece has a flat back with a small raised iron knob, and may have been the terminal end of a vessel handle, or may have been fitted into armor such as a cuirass. The latter scenario is more likely, as the raised knob resembles the remnants of an iron pin which would define this piece as a fitting, or a decorative attachment. This piece has a very well-defined face with sharp eyes, and detailed individual hair with hanging curls. The hanging curls are very detailed, and are very realistic in their design. In addition, this piece has a finely sculpted mouth and rounded chin, which is an artistic style that resembles the earlier Greek facing head coinage from Rhodes. The overall image greatly resembles a Greco-Roman theater mask, or it may also be, and double as a protective Medusa. Whatever the case, this piece is a very fine example, with extremely fine artistic style, very high relief, and a beautiful even dark green patina with minute spotty red highlights. This piece is also attached to a custom Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1382837
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This interesting piece is a Teotihaucan tripod vase that dates to the Early to Middle Classic Period, circa 300-600 A.D. This piece is approximately 5.4 inches high, by 5.7 inches in diameter, and is intact with no restoration and/or repair. This esoteric piece has a slightly flared rim, and has three hollow slab legs that were attached on the flat bottom of the main body of the vessel. These slab legs have a sacred woven mat pattern seen within, and the dark gray main body has a thin outer stucco covering that has yellow, orange, and green colors over a thin coating of white plaster. The painted iconography features two green-limbed plants seen over a yellow ground line, which are also seen on opposite sides of the vessel, and these may represent the flowering nopal (prickly pear) cactus which has medicinal properties. The stucco is also about 90% intact, and has additional pictured objects, although much of the outer layer has been eroded away. The stucco is also much more complete than what is usually seen, and has not been restored and/or over painted. This complete vessel has rare iconography, and is a superb example for the type. Another vessel of this type and size is seen in the St. Louis Art Museum, and is seen in "Pre-Columbian Art: The Morton D. May and The St. Louis Art Museum Collections", By Lee Parsons, New York, 1980. no. 134. Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamberg, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic, as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : European Medieval : Pre AD 1000 item #1339132
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This nice piece is a Viking bronze pendant that dates circa 9th-10th century A.D. This piece is approximately 1.7 inches high, and the round plaque section is approximately 1.2 inches in diameter. This piece was made from two sections, one being the flat round plaque, and the other, is the strap loop that has a single rivet securing it to the main body of the piece. The round plaque has a hammered dotted border, and a hammered Christian Byzantine type cross design that has a round center. This round center may also double as a solar symbol, and the cross design also has an additional smaller cross patterns seen at the end of all four points. The design of this Christian cross, seen on this pendant, may also be one of the earliest Christian cross examples seen on a Viking culture type piece. The cross design also has remains of a light green to cream colored enamel, and this shows well against the dark green patina that this piece has. This piece is an complete exceptional example for the type, and is not often seen on the market in this superb condition. This piece is solid, and can easily be worn today. This piece also hangs on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private Denmark collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1385577
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This superb to mint quality coin is a Greek gold stater of Alexander the Great, circa 323-320 B.C., and grades EF+/FDC (Extremely Fine+/Mint State). This beautiful coin also weighs 8.6 gms, and is perfectly centered. This coin was minted in Miletos, and was struck under Philoxenos, who was a general of Alexander the Great. The obverse (Obv.) of this coin features the helmeted head of Athena facing right, and is wearing a Corinthian helmet with a coiled serpent. There are also flowing locks of hair seen on the cheek and neck, which is also a unique feature of this obverse die and coin type. The reverse (Rev.) has a finely detailed and exceptional standing Nike holding a victory wreath in her extended right hand, and a stylis in the left hand. The Nike seen here is also one of the best examples seen on a coin of this type, as one can see the minute facial details that are not normally seen. There is also a (Delta H) monogram in the left field. (Another example of this type and grade was offered by Larry Goldberg Coins & Collectibles, Auction 72, no. 4047. $2,500.00-$3,000.00 estimates, $5,000.00 realized.) References: Price 2078; SNG Ashmolean 2774. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1389023
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This powerful piece is a seated Colima warrior that dates to the Protoclassic Period, circa 100 B.C.-250 A.D., and is approximately 14 inches high. This reddish-brown seated warrior has long youthful limbs, and is seen with the raised right arm balanced on his knee. His cupped right hand perhaps once held an implement, or a lance made from perishable material. This warrior also appears to be in a trance, and has a rounded face with closed "coffee-bean" style eyes. He is also seen wearing a pendant tied around the neck, a headdress/helmet with a small "feline headed" medallion, and raised inlay stone tattoos on the shoulders. The left side of his nude torso is also decorated with a band of black geometric "line-design" tattoos. This piece has very realistic body molding seen on the back side of the vessel, and has a very angular nose. His ears are also pierced for earrings, and overall, this warrior exudes a regal like appearance. This piece was offered for the deceased, and was likely a "protector-type" figurine. The form of this Colima piece is also rare, and the figurine offered here is a rare example that is also known as the "Coahuayana Valley" type. This piece is also intact with no apparent repair and/or restoration, and has some spotty and minute black mineral deposits. A superb large example with a high degree of eye appeal. For the type see: R. Townsend, "Ancient West Mexico, Art and Archaeology of the Unknown Past", The Art Institute of Chicago, 1998. Ex: Sotheby's Parke Bernet, Pre-Columbian Art, New York, Dec. 1981, no. 165. ($2,200.00 realized.) Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, Nov. 2004, no. 268. ($4000.00-$6,000.00 estimates). Ex: Private Kansas collection, circa 2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #891841
Apolonia Ancient Art
$685.00
This extremely rare Greek Attic piece is a blackware glazed pyxis that dates circa 5th-4th century B.C. This piece has two sections that are both intact, and no repair/restoration. In addition, there are no minute cracks seen in both sections, and there are some heavy white calcite deposits with some attractive root marking that is seen in various sections of the vessel. This piece also has decorative white concentric circles that are seen on the top lid. This piece is approximately 4.8 inches high by 5.6 inches in diameter, and has some glaze loss, seen mostly on the top lid of the vessel. This top lid is actually a hidden cup that lifts out of the top of the vessel, and is approximately 2.4 inches high by 2.6 inches in diameter. This esoteric pyxis also has some analogous design features that are seen on Attic "West Slope" pyxides, such as high thin walls and an extended ring base. Greek Attic ceramics are often thin walled, as they were created with a high firing temperature, and this produced a durable light weight ceramic as the piece offered here. This type of vessel was often "votive", and served a variety of purposes. Some of these contained personal items that belonged to the deceased, some served as cinerary urns, and others contained cosmetics. The piece offered here may not have been exclusively "votive" in nature, as the lid/cup may have been used to measure a liquid or a solid such as grain. Whatever the case, this piece is an extremely rare Greek vessel, and is of a type and form that is not often seen on the market. Ex: Private Florida collection (1980's). Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1394722
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This rare piece is a Greek rhyton that dates to the mid 4th century B.C., and is approximately 9.5 inches long, by 4.8 inches in diameter at the rim. This well-defined piece was formed from a mold, and is a light tan terracotta that has a spotty light black glaze with some dark to light brown burnishing. This piece is also intact, and has no apparent repair and/or restoration. The detailed ram's head at the terminal end of this attractive piece has a very defined snout, eyes, and horns. There is also a single looped strap handle under the flared rim, and a small pin hole is seen at the end of the snout. This feature is also an indication that this piece was a votive type piece, and was made so the departed could toast the gods. This vessel also has concentric serrated ridges that run around the main body of the vessel, and this was an aid in grasping this vessel with one hand, as this was a drinking vessel. Greek drinking cups of this type were very popular and were used for banquets, weddings, and drinking parties. There were all sorts of shapes for them - bulls, goats, dogs, and the ram as seen here. Regardless of the type, not many ceramic rhyton vessels have been found on the market, and most surviving examples were most likely votive in nature. Another analogous example of this type and size is from the Arthur Sackler Foundation, and was on loan to Fordham's University Museum of Greek, Etruscan, and Roman Art. (See attached photo.) The rare piece offered here also sits on a custom display stand. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1404824
Apolonia Ancient Art
$12,875.00
This extremely rare Greek bronze dates to the Geometric Period, circa late 8th-7th century B.C., and is approximately 3.9 inches high. This piece is a votive bronze warrior, and was likely offered to a shrine such as Dodona or Delphi. In addition, this type is known as a "ithyphallic type" figurine, as this figurine displays a large phallus, and is a symbol of strength and fertility, along with the cult of Dionysus. This piece also has a bent lower right leg, and was intentionally bent so that the spirit of the warrior would not spiritually leave the shrine. This piece also has a single belt seen around the waist, has incised facial details, and outstretched stubby arms. The head also has an angular jaw and large almond eyes that are artistic hallmarks of the Greek "Geometric Period". This piece has a beautiful light blue patina with dark brown/green highlights, and is intact with no repair and/or restoration. This piece is also very analogous, and nearly identical to an example found at the Greek sacred shrine of Dodona, and is now on display at the Archaeological Museum of Ioannina, Greece, no. 4905. (For a view of this piece, see the attached photo from the Archaeological Museum of Ioannina, and at Wikimedia: https://commons.wikimedia.org). The piece offered here is about the same size as the piece noted above, and both pieces were cast as a single piece. The piece noted above also has three belt rings seen around the waist, and the piece offered here has a single belt ring. This belt ring may also signify the rank of the warrior, and these warriors are completely nude save for these waist belt rings. There is also a strong possibility that the Museum of Ioannina piece noted above, and the piece offered here, were both made at the same workshop. This piece is also analogous to a larger Greek Bronze Warrior that was offered in Christie's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2014, no. 7 ($40,000.00-$60,000.00 estimates, $43,750.00 realized. See attached photo.) The extremely rare piece offered here is seldom seen on the market, as there are only a handful of recorded examples, and the majority of bronze figurines of this design are Italic in origin and date circa 625-600 B.C. This piece also hangs on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: M. Waltz collection, Germany, circa 1960's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser including US Customs Entry documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1385660
Apolonia Ancient Art
$465.00
This powerful piece is a bronze Luristan panther head finial piece that dates circa 1000-650 B.C., and is approximately 2 inches high. This complete piece is the terminal end for a finial that may have been part of a staff, or a section of a horse or wagon fitting. The panther head image seen here is very powerful, and has an open roaring mouth, a flat front nose, and rounded ears seen at the back of the head. This type of piece was also a "protector" type piece, and was integrated with the "Master of the Animals Cult" that was prevalent with this culture. This piece is a solid cast example, and is rather heavy, as there is no hollow core. This piece also has a lovely dark green patina with some spotty dark red highlights, along with some minute white calcite deposits. Overall, a nice example with an exceptional patina which is also an excellent mark of authenticity. This piece is also solidly mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. Collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #633629
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,185.00
This beautiful Greek bronze kalyx cup dates circa 5th-4th century B.C., and is approximately 4.4 inches in diameter, by 3 inches high. This piece is a thick walled example, and is also a large example for the type. This piece is intact and is in superb condition, save for two small stress cracks seen on the upper rim which were formed from ground pressures. These stress cracks are also an excellent indication of authenticity, and are in fact, an added plus towards the value of the piece. This attractive piece has an exceptional dark green patina with mixed dark red highlights, and there are spotty mineral deposits which are dark blue and red. The patina seen on this exceptional piece is very desirable, due to the reasons noted above, and has a great deal of eye appeal. This piece was hand made from one sheet of bronze, and was hammered into shape and the form we see today. This piece was finished with detailed repousse decoration in the form of a floral pattern, seen centered at the bottom, and this pattern extends up the sides with elongated petals. There is also a hand chased decorative band that runs around the center of the vessel, and this vessel displays several forms of hand worked design which also make this an exceptional example of "Classical Period" ancient Greek art and workmanship. The shape and decorative elements seen on this piece was derived from the earlier Achaemenid (Persian Empire) deep bowls. (For an explanation of the type see D.E. Strong, "Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate, London 1966, p.99.) This shape also appears in Attic pottery in the fifth and fourth century B.C., and the Achaemenid influence was felt in Greece well before the conquests of Alexander the Great, who subsequently paved the way to direct contact between Greek art and the East. These types of cups have also been found in silver, with and without the detailed design seen on the vessel offered here. The workmanship is also better than what is usually seen, as it has very fine detail, and this piece was probably made for the table of a wealthy individual. This piece also comes with a custom Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1980.s-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Faience : Pre AD 1000 item #1315066
Apolonia Ancient Art
$8,865.00
This attractive and extremely rare piece is an Egyptian faience aryballos that dates to the Late Period, Dynasty XXVI, circa 664-525 B.C. This extremely large piece is approximately 4.25 inches high, by 3.6 inches in diameter, and is one of the largest recorded examples. This turquoise blue piece was mold made from faience, and was then hand sculpted which produced the sharp details and design features that are seen on this esoteric piece. This piece also has a spherical body with five registers, and there is a small circular depression seen on the bottom which is surrounded by thirty-two pedals with a detailed double row of lotus leaves seen above. There is also a cross-hatching design that is seen through the middle of the body, with two rows of pedals above. This piece was also designed with a short cylindrical neck, along with an inward-sloping disk rim and a wide attached strap handle. There are some spotty light brown deposits seen in various sections of the outer surfaces, and considerable white calcite deposits that are seen on the inside of the vessel. This piece also has some skillful old repair, as this piece was repaired from three large fragments, and is 100% original. This extremely rare piece may have been produced in Naukratis, a port in the Egyptian delta that was founded by Greeks in the 7th century B.C. Naukratis was an exclusive Greek community organized by Amasis, and many of it's exports found their way into many foreign markets, including the Etruscans who coveted Greek and Egyptian objects. This type of extremely large faience aryballos is also listed as being produced in Rhodes by V. Webb in "Archaic Greek Faience", Warminster, 1978. (See nos. 705 and 743. No. 705 is approximately the same size as the piece offered here. See attached photo.) Another extremely rare example was sold in Cahn Auktionen AG, Basil, Switzerland, Sept. 2010, no. 72. (SF 9,000.00 estimate, SF 12,000.00 realized. The Cahn example is approximately the same size as the piece offered here, has very analogous main body cross-hatching design, upper shoulder pedal design, and was repaired from large fragments as the example offered here. See attached photo.) The piece offered here also stands by itself, and a clear Plexiglas display stand is also included. Ex: Private European collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2003, no. 41. ($8,000.00-$12,000.00 estimates. See attached photo.) Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1386365
Apolonia Ancient Art
$385.00
This piece is a Greco-Roman lead horse that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 1.5 inches long, by 1.25 inches high. This piece was a "votive" type object, and was likely sold to the devoted as solely a votive object for dedication at a shrine or grave. This horse may also represent a racing type horse, or one that was tied to a chariot, and may be part of a complete object such as a chariot. This piece was cast from two halves, and was mold made. The horse is complete, save for three of the lower legs, and is a better example that what is recorded, as it is scarce to rare. This piece also has nice detail with the head, and there are reigns that are visible on the neck and body. This piece is also likely Thracian in origin, as votive lead plaques were common for the period and region as well. This piece also has an attractive dark to light gray patina, with spotty dark black and brown highlights. This piece also is mounted on a custom display stand, and has nice eye appeal. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1304240
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This nice piece is a Roman bronze "crossbow type" fibula that dates circa early 4th century A.D. This piece is approximately 3.6 inches long, by 2.25 inches wide, and is in mint to superb condition. This intact and complete piece has a main body that was cast as one piece, and there are three small decorative spheres were later added with pins. The single intact attachment pin was added to the horizontal arm, and engages in the straight section of the vertical section. This thin attachment pin still has some movement, and can move in and out of the vertical clasp, and up and down within the horizontal arm. The overall design of this attractive piece is in the form of a Latin Cross, and also represents Christ on the Cross. The "crossbow fibula" type was derived from the earlier Etruscan and Greek "bow type". The "crossbow type" fibula seen here was very common in the 4th and 5th century A.D., and is thought to have originated in the Danube region, from which it spread throughout the Roman Empire. The piece offered here is a male fibula, and was worn by soldiers, and by high ranking civil servants and officials. This piece was used primarily to fasten the cloak on the shoulder of the wearer. Many of these examples also had gold and silver gilt, and were inlaid with precious stones. The example offered here has no traces of gold and silver gilt, but it does have eight rounded holes seen in the flat section of the vertical arm, and these holes could have held mounted precious stones or glass. This piece also has a beautiful dark emerald green patina, and is an exceptional example for the type. This piece stands on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Prehistorical item #1402347
Apolonia Ancient Art
$685.00
This intact and attractive piece is an Apulian-Gnathian pelike that dates to the late 4th century B.C., and is approximately 4.7 inches high. This piece has a thin black glaze with attractive light gray burnishing, and is an intact example with no repair and/or restoration. This vessel also has additional and detailed fine body molding seen at the upper rim, and above the ring base on the lower body of the vessel. There are added incised decorative tendril vines that run around the upper shoulder, and these incised elements are also seen on the neck of the vessel. There are also added white painted vine leaves and grape clusters, although faded, that are seen on this vessel as well. This piece has some minute root marking, and some light brown mineral deposits which also add to this vessel's eye appeal. A nice intact piece with fine body molding, and likely made by an accomplished potter. Ex: Hans Piehler collection, Germany, circa 1940's-1960's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1402708
Apolonia Ancient Art
$965.00
This rare coin is a Greek silver drachm from the Epirote Republic, and dates circa 234-168 B.C. This coin is superb grade (EF+/EF+) condition, weighs 4.8 gms, and is approximately 22mm in diameter. This coin has a large flan, and is a well centered example. This coin features on the obverse (Obv.), a detailed and laureate bust of Zeus facing right, and three separate monograms seen behind and below the bust. The reverse (Rev.) features: a standing eagle on a thunderbolt facing right, with the legend "ADEI" before, and "PUTAN" behind, all within a laurel wreath that is seen framing the border. The standing eagle is also a symbol of Zeus, and was a messenger of the gods. The monograms seen on the obverse may refer to the magistrate that minted this coin and/or the name of the current ruler of the Epirote Republic. The reverse legend also refers to the Epirote Republic as well, and this coin was likely minted in the sacred site of Dodona. Another analogous example of the rare coin type was sold by Nomos AG in Zurich, Switzerland, Oct. 2015, no. 85. (Estimate 500 CHF, 2200 CHF realized. EF/EF- grade. See attached photo.) References: Franke, Epirus, Series 29 (var.); SNG COP 114. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: