Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1386486
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This beautiful Greek terracotta dates to the 4th century B.C., and is approximately 3.8 inches high. This large bust is intact, and is a complete bust of a very large standing terracotta of a goddess such as Persephone, who is the Greek goddess of harvest and fertility. This esoteric bust has exceptional artistic style, as the head is slightly tilted to the left, and the head is slightly uplifted. The hair is also tied upwards into a bun above the forehead, and the face has a slight smile. This very large bust is in it's natural "as found" condition with it's natural earthen deposits, and is an exceptional example for the type. This piece is also mounted on a custom steel and Plexiglas display stand with a total height of approximately 5 inches. For the type see "Tanagra Mythe et Archeologie", Louve, Paris, 2004, fig. 107. Ex: Munzen and Medaillen AG Basel, Switzerland, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Faience : Pre AD 1000 item #1315066
Apolonia Ancient Art
$8,865.00
This attractive and extremely rare piece is an Egyptian faience aryballos that dates to the Late Period, Dynasty XXVI, circa 664-525 B.C. This extremely large piece is approximately 4.25 inches high, by 3.6 inches in diameter, and is one of the largest recorded examples. This turquoise blue piece was mold made from faience, and was then hand sculpted which produced the sharp details and design features that are seen on this esoteric piece. This piece also has a spherical body with five registers, and there is a small circular depression seen on the bottom which is surrounded by thirty-two pedals with a detailed double row of lotus leaves seen above. There is also a cross-hatching design that is seen through the middle of the body, with two rows of pedals above. This piece was also designed with a short cylindrical neck, along with an inward-sloping disk rim and a wide attached strap handle. There are some spotty light brown deposits seen in various sections of the outer surfaces, and considerable white calcite deposits that are seen on the inside of the vessel. This piece also has some skillful old repair, as this piece was repaired from three large fragments, and is 100% original. This extremely rare piece may have been produced in Naukratis, a port in the Egyptian delta that was founded by Greeks in the 7th century B.C. Naukratis was an exclusive Greek community organized by Amasis, and many of it's exports found their way into many foreign markets, including the Etruscans who coveted Greek and Egyptian objects. This type of extremely large faience aryballos is also listed as being produced in Rhodes by V. Webb in "Archaic Greek Faience", Warminster, 1978. (See nos. 705 and 743. No. 705 is approximately the same size as the piece offered here. See attached photo.) Another extremely rare example was sold in Cahn Auktionen AG, Basil, Switzerland, Sept. 2010, no. 72. (SF 9,000.00 estimate, SF 12,000.00 realized. The Cahn example is approximately the same size as the piece offered here, has very analogous main body cross-hatching design, upper shoulder pedal design, and was repaired from large fragments as the example offered here. See attached photo.) The piece offered here also stands by itself, and a clear Plexiglas display stand is also included. Ex: Private European collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2003, no. 41. ($8,000.00-$12,000.00 estimates. See attached photo.) Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1394722
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This rare piece is a Greek rhyton that dates to the mid 4th century B.C., and is approximately 9.5 inches long, by 4.8 inches in diameter at the rim. This well-defined piece was formed from a mold, and is a light tan terracotta that has a spotty light black glaze with some dark to light brown burnishing. This piece is also intact, and has no apparent repair and/or restoration. The detailed ram's head at the terminal end of this attractive piece has a very defined snout, eyes, and horns. There is also a single looped strap handle under the flared rim, and a small pin hole is seen at the end of the snout. This feature is also an indication that this piece was a votive type piece, and was made so the departed could toast the gods. This vessel also has concentric serrated ridges that run around the main body of the vessel, and this was an aid in grasping this vessel with one hand, as this was a drinking vessel. Greek drinking cups of this type were very popular and were used for banquets, weddings, and drinking parties. There were all sorts of shapes for them - bulls, goats, dogs, and the ram as seen here. Regardless of the type, not many ceramic rhyton vessels have been found on the market, and most surviving examples were most likely votive in nature. Another analogous example of this type and size is from the Arthur Sackler Foundation, and was on loan to Fordham's University Museum of Greek, Etruscan, and Roman Art. (See attached photo.) The rare piece offered here also sits on a custom display stand. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1386086
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This intact Chavin piece is a canteen designed vessel with a seated deity that dates to the Middle Chavin Period, circa 1000-700 B.C. This interesting piece is approximately 8.75 inches high, by 4.5 inches in diameter at the center of the vessel. This piece is a seated deity with a rounded body, extended nose, and appears to be wearing a skull cap and a loose mantle. There are also two suspension holes seen on each side of the raised spout, and this piece may have been carried as a canteen that likely held a sacred liquid. The arms and hands are also tucked in at the front, and has an analogous design as the sculptural deities that were excavated by Julio Tello at Moxeke, Peru. (See attached photo that is seen in "Chavin and the Origins of Andean Civilization" by Richard Burger, Thames and Hudson Pub., 1992, p. 83, fig. 66.) There is also a strong probability that this piece is a "ceremonial type" vessel and was used for offerings and ceremony. This piece has a thick dark gray glaze over the entire vessel, some attractive dark brown burnishing, and is intact with no repair and/or restoration. This piece is not only a scarce to rare Chavin vessel that is seldom seen on the market, but more importantly, it is also an important ceremonial type that depicts a sacred deity. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export, and US Customs Import documentation. In addition, there is a TL authentication lab test from Gutachten Lab, Germany, dated 06/11/1979, no. 3679116. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1169806
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This large piece is a "Veracruz" culture standing priest, Remojadas type, that dates from the Classic period, circa 450-650 A.D. This piece is approximately 22.5 inches high, and easily stands by itself on a custom wooden stand. This piece is of an artistic style, known as "Remojadas", which is the name of a particular archaeological site, although objects in closely related styles actually come from a number of different sites in Veracruz. The name "Remojadas" thus refers to objects from south-central Veracruz, generally from the Classic-period. This piece is also known as a "Xipe-Toltec" type priest, as he portrays the god in costume. The "Xipe-Toltec" cult flourished along the Gulf Coast of modern day Mexico during the Classic and early Postclassic periods before gaining a prominent place in the Aztec pantheon, probably as a result of the subsequent Aztec domination of the Gulf Coast in the mid-15th century. Most Xipe figures vividly depict a human inside a flayed skin of another man, and this god was known as "Our Lord the Flayed One". According to Charles Phillips in "Aztec and Maya", Lorenz Pub., London, 2007, p. 62: "Victims killed in honour of Xipe Totec, the god of planting and vegetation, were shot with arrows so that their blood flowed into the earth like life-giving waters. Indeed, the Aztecs called human blood "chalchiuatl" (precious water). The corpse was then flayed and a priest would wear the skin in honour of the god. The rite was a celebration of the splitting of seeds that makes possible the growth of new vegetation each spring." Mary Miller and Karl Taube in "Ancient Mexico and the Maya", Thames and Hudson Pub., London, 1993, p. 188 also add: "At the time of the Conquest the Xipe festival fell during the spring, in our month of March, and much of its imagery suggests agricultural renewal: as a seed germinates, it feeds off the rotting hull around it, finally letting the new shoot emerge. The Xipe impersonators wore the old skins until they were rotten, when the young man once again emerged." The Xipe-Toltec piece offered here displays a priest wearing the flayed skin of a sacrificial victim, as seen with the rolled skin folds seen hanging below the neck, the skin leggings, the skin bundles tied at the back shoulder and the right hip, and the human skin mask. There are black-bitumen painted highlights seen on the headband with medallions, earplugs, lips, and eyes. There are also black-bitumen painted extruded eyeballs that are seen hanging from the eye openings, and the black lips accentuate an open mouth that shows this dramatic figurine chanting in a ritual posture. This expressive figure is also holding a floral designed fan with petals, which may represent the Xipe ritual of regeneration. This piece is made from a light gray terracotta, and has light tan mineral deposits. This complete piece was repaired from several large fragments, which is usually the case for large-scale Veracruz pieces such as this, and this piece is a better example than what is usually seen. The floral fan is an attribute that is seldom seen as well, and this is a principle reason why this large example is a scarce to rare type. The floral fan also indicates that the individual depicted is likely in the act of performing the "Xipe-Toltec" regeneration ceremony, along with the fact that this priest is seen with an open mouth who appears to be chanting in the act of the regeneration ceremony which ensured the planting and growth of the new years crops. The majority of these figurines are seen simply standing in an upright position, and are not seen holding any implements of any sort, but more importantly, the majority of these Veracruz "Xipe-Toltec" figurines do not display a dramatic facial expression such as this example. (Another Veracruz "Remojadas" example of this type and of the same size is offered in Bonhams African, Oceanic & Pre-Columbian Art, New York, Nov. 2012, no. 3. $8,000.00-$12,000.00 estimates, $10,000.00 realized.) For the type offered here see: "Ancient Art of Veracruz", Ethnic Arts Council of Los Angeles, 1971, no. 31. The piece offered here is definitely ceremonial in nature, and easily conveys this fact to the viewer, which is not often the case relative to figurines of this type. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Bonhams Art & Artifacts of the Americas auction, San Francisco, Sept. 2012, no. 1039. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1338758
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This attractive Greek vessel is a silver kantharos that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 2nd-1st century B.C. This large piece is approximately 4.9 inches high, by 5.75 inches wide from handle to handle. This scarce piece has a nice even dark gray patina with spotty dark black highlights, and in addition, has not been over cleaned, and has natural surfaces. This piece was made from four separate parts: the main "mastos type" cup body, the cast stem base, and the two (2) applied strap handles. The main body is a 'mastos type" cup design, and pieces of this type are often seen and offered on the market as a singular cup. This mastos cup, that doubles as the main body of this vessel, was hand beaten and spun on a lathe into the oval shape that is now seen. The upper lip has an attractive indented surface below the lip that is an esoteric design that took a great deal of skill to produce. The cast stem base was added at the bottom center, and the two applied handles were applied possibly in antiquity some years after this stemmed vessel was produced. It is also possible that the stem base and the two handles were added together in antiquity as well, which produced an elegant table vessel that could stand by itself. The two applied strap handles also have attractive "cross hatching" designs that were hammered into the outer surfaces. This superb piece is intact, and there are some minor scratches, some minor dents, and root marking which is normal for a vessel of this type, and these features also point to the authenticity of the vessel. The "mastos type" body is also defined by D.E. Strong in "Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate", London, 1966, pp. 107-109, Fig. 24. (The piece offered here is a "deep conical type" as seen in Fig. 24, no. a. See attached photo.) The piece offered here not only is a scarce type that has an esoteric design, but it also has great eye appeal and was expensive to produce in antiquity. A silver vessel of this type could only have been on the table of a wealthy individual. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1339434
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This detailed little gem of a piece is a Greek silver infant fibula pin that dates circa 4th-3rd century B.C., and is approximately 1.2 inches high, by .75 inches wide. This piece is extremely rare to rare, as it was made for an infant, and it has extremely fine details and workmanship. Ancient Greek silver fibula pins of this type, are seldom seen on the market, and there is the possibility that this type of fibula was more votive in nature. This piece is intact, save for the missing pin, and it is "bow-shaped" with three raised "barrel-type" sections seen within the length of the piece. At the terminal end where the rotating pin was attached, there is a dainty, but detailed acanthus design seen on the front side. The back side of this terminal end is flat, and one can easily discern that this side is the back side of the piece. This piece has a lovely light gray patina, with some spotty dark gray mineral deposits. An analogous example can be seen in the Metropolitan Museum of New York, accession number: 52.36. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1383122
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This scarce Greek Attic piece is a vessel stand, and dates circa 5th-4th century B.C. This appealing piece is approximately 2 inches high, by 3.5 inches in diameter at the upper rim. This piece is made from a light red terracotta, and there are several dark brown and red glazed concentric circles that are seen mostly on the underside, and on the topside of the raised flat top base. This piece also has a well-designed rounded lip that is slightly raised over the flat top base, and this design feature was an aid in securing a vessel that would have been placed on this stand. This piece also has a wide fluted base, and has two small holes near the edge of the base that were designed to suspend this piece from a small cord. This piece is also intact, and has no apparent repair and/or restoration. This piece is a scarce Greek Attic ceramic type, and is not often seen on the market. Ex: Hans Piehler collection, Germany, circa 1940's-1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1357519
Apolonia Ancient Art
$725.00
This scarce piece is a Greek bronze knife handle in the shape of an amphora, and dates to the Geometric Period, circa 800-700 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.75 inches high, by .75 inches wide, by .2 inches thick. This piece is a solid example and was cast as one piece, and is intact with no restoration/repair. This piece is in the shape of a wine amphora, which has two handles attached to the upper shoulder, a fluted neck, and a wide rim. In addition, the lower body of the amphora displays a knobbed base. This piece is also decorated with several "punched concentric circles", which are also seen on both sides of the piece. This decorative element is a hallmark design of the Greek Geometric Period, and is seen on many bronzes from the period that display flat surfaces. There are also incised lines that cross over the body of the amphora. This attractive piece also served as a knife handle, and iron filling from the missing iron blade can still be seen within the opening at the top of the piece. This piece was likely a shaving razor, or perhaps held a punch tool extension. This piece also has an attractive light to dark green patina, with some spotty dark blue highlights. This piece also fits on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. This piece can also be worn and fitted as a pendant, and this may also have been the case in antiquity. Ex: Fortuna Fine arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1136766
Apolonia Ancient Art
$725.00
This esoteric little piece is a Greek Boeotian terracotta that dates from the early to the mid 5th century B.C. This intact piece is approximately 5.8 inches high, and has no repair/restoration. This piece is a light brown/red terracotta, and there are traces of a white slip and tan earthen deposits. This appealing piece was mold made and depicts a nude young man, who is seen holding a pet cock against his body in the crook of his right arm, and in his left hand, an aryballos with a strigil. This standing young man is seen completely nude, and generally, this Boeotian terracotta type normally has the standing nude young man wearing a symmetrical himation, which is seen from the front framing his nude body from his back and sides. (See attached photo of a young man wearing a himation, which is seen in the British Museum and in "Greek Terracottas" by R.A. Higgins, Methuen & Co. Pub., London, 1967, Pl. 33, no. E.) This piece also has a large rectangular vent hole seen at the back, has the left leg slightly forward, and the figure is seen on a square base that is open on the inside. According to Higgins on page 77 in the reference noted above, "The purpose of these pieces would seem to be rather different from that of most Greek terracottas, which tended at most periods to represent deities, for these are clearly human. Many were found in tombs, and it is hard to escape the conclusion that they were intended to serve the same purpose as the Egyptian ushabtis-to minister to the needs of the dead in the next world." The piece seen here is a scarce type, as the young man is seen completely nude, and is not seen partially clothed with a himation. The completely nude type may also predate the types that are seen wearing a himation, and are likely the successors to the Greek "Kouros" type in sculpture that dates circa 510-490 B.C. The piece offered here has stylistic features that are analogous to the Greek "Kouros" type in sculpture such as: the stiff upright pose with one leg advanced slightly forward, a totally nude body, and square shoulders. This nude young man also appears to be on the way, or returning from the gymnasium, as the aryballos held oil for exercise, and the strigil was used to clean it from the body. A scarce piece with a great deal of eye appeal. A custom black wooden display stand is also included. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1331598
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This attractive brownware ceramic is a Mayan carved bowl that dates circa 550-950 A.D. This piece is approximately 9.75 inches in diameter, by 3.7 inches high. This powerful looking piece has a flat bottom with gently curved side walls, and this design made it very easy for catching liquids. This piece has detailed deep carving, within three rectangular panels, and this skilled carving is in the form of a head commonly known as a "Long-Lipped Monster", and was described as such in the Sotheby's reference noted below. This type of Mayan image is rare, although it is a known image relative to Mayan iconography. This rare image is designed in glyph form, and is comprised of a scroll eye, upturned snout, bared fangs, smoke scrolls curling at the back, and sections of crosshatched elements. Each of the three rectangular panels are also separated by two smooth petalled-shaped motifs, and the entire bowl thus has a floral-like appearance. The "Long-Lipped Monster" image depicted here may also represent what is known in Mayan iconography as a "Square-Nosed Serpent" image. According to Andrea Stone and Marc Zender in "Reading Maya Art, A Hieroglyphic Guide to Ancient Maya Painting and Sculpture", Thames and Hudson, London, 2011, p. 227: "This logograph combines ophidian and floral elements in the form of a band that makes several 90-degree turns, suggesting the upturned snout of a sinuous serpent. Eye and nose rest atop the band and beneath are several curly fangs and no lower jaw. This 'square' or 'fret-nosed serpent' is a prominent, albeit esoteric, feature of Maya art. It seems to embody a radiant life force, expelled through the mouth, nose, or center of a flower, and dispersed throughout the universe, much like mana in Polynesia." This logograph is also associated with Mayan ceremonial bloodletting, and it is also quite possible that the Mayan bowl offered here was a part of this ceremony, and this bowl is in essence, a Mayan ceremonial offering bowl. This vessel also has a light yellow/brown polychrome slip seen both over the inner and outer surfaces, and each of the three rectangular panels have traces of white stucco and red cinnabar that are seen down within the low relief areas of the deep carvings. The carvings seen within each of the three rectangular panels are nearly identical, and were each carved individually, such was the skill of the artist. In addition, the inner surface has a black band seen at the rim and a black circle applied to the inner flat base, and resembles a target for ceremonial bloodletting into the vessel. It's also interesting to note that the color red also contrasts with black, and is easily seen. There is also some attractive and extensive root marking and dark black/brown burnishing seen mostly on the inner surfaces, and there are also some spotty minute dark black mineral deposits which are normally seen on authentic vessels of this type. This piece is also 100% original, and was repaired from three large fragments. This limited repair also appears to have been done some time ago. The interior of the bowl is smooth, and also has a thin polychrome glaze on both the inner and outer surfaces. Overall, this piece is a fine example of a carved Mayan vessel, and the detailed and deep carving also gives this piece powerful eye appeal. Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, May 1995, no. 170. ($2,500.00-$3,000.00 estimates.) (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #956245
Apolonia Ancient Art
$625.00
These three pieces are being offered as one lot, as they are made from the same light red/tan clay fabric, and have similar light tan earthern deposits that have minute root marking. These three intact pieces are all classified as being Greek Corinthian, and date circa mid 6th century B.C. The first piece is an aryballos, that is approximately 2.25 inches high. This petite piece has some dark brown design elements that are seen at the rounded base, and is in superb condition, save for some unobtrusive chips that are seen below the lip. The second piece is a thin walled skyphos, that is approximately 3.1 inches high by 6 inches wide handle to handle. This piece is also in superb condition, save for a minute chip at the base that may be from antiquity. The third piece is a exaleiptron, otherwise known as a "kothon", which was used as a funerary ritual vessel that contained aromatic oil. This piece is also in superb condition, save for a minute chip at the end of one of the two handle flares. This vessel has a low foot ring and has traces of geometric light brown painted line design under the earthern deposits. All three of the superb vessels offered here may have been used in a votive funerary ritual as well. All three of these pieces are in an intact "as found" condition, although they have little or no glaze with heavy tan earthen deposits. Corinthian vessels, such as the three examples offered here, were also exported throughout the ancient Greek world during the 6th century B.C., and competed for markets with ancient Greek Attic ceramics. An interesting group that is being offered as one lot. Ex: Arte Primitivo, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 2000's. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1356647
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This nice Roman bronze is an eagle applique that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 2.2 inches high, by 2 inches high. This piece is a very detailed Roman eagle that has a raised head and spread wings. The wings are very detailed, and have very fine feather "line design". The head is designed with the head facing right, and is seen looking at the viewer. There is also detail on the head not facing the viewer, and there is a very defined "dotted eye". This piece has a flat back, and there is an extended mounting pin seen in the back center. This piece likely served as an applique for a vessel, and may have served as a decorative element in a legionary phalera, or an element in Roman armor. The military application relative to this piece is readily apparent, as the Roman eagle was the Roman symbol of the power, and was presented in many art forms within the Roman army. This attractive piece is intact, and has no repair/restoration. This piece also has a nice dark green patina with some minute red highlights, and is a fine example for the type. Another analogous example was offered by Bonham's Antiquities, London, July 1995, no. 442. (500-600 pounds estimates. See attached photo.) The nice piece offered here is also mounted on a custom display base. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Concordia Art, Las Vegas, NV., circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1323832
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This superb silver tetrobol (four obols) was minted in northern Greece in the fortress city of Olynthos. This beautiful "Classical Period" piece was minted circa 420-400 B.C., and is an early issue for the mint. This piece is superb quality, i.e. good extremely fine condition (EF+/EF+), is approximately 16 mm in diameter, weighs 2.6 gms, and has perfect centering with a light gray patina. The obverse has a bust of Apollo facing left, wearing a wreath, within a dotted border. There is also a Greek delta letter seen behind the bust, and this may indicate the mint master, or possibly be an artist's die signature. The reverse features a lyre, probably representing the lyre of Apollo, with Greek lettering around meaning (Chalkidike), all within an incuse square. Olynthos was the center of the Chalkidian League and issued a series of coins with beautiful heads of Apollo. This "Classical Period" coin shows the early head of Apollo for the series, which is known as the "severe style". This artistic style also best represents "Archaic Period" Greek sculpture. An exceptional high quality coin for this scarce early issue, and has perfect centering with a full dotted border which is not often seen. References: Sear 1425; Robinson-Clement, Group C, no. 24. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1385409
Apolonia Ancient Art
$975.00
This scarce piece is a Moche stirrup-vessel with a mythical creature, and dates circa 450-600 A.D., Moche IV-V Periods. This interesting piece is approximately 10.9 inches high, and is intact with no repair and/or restoration. This piece has alternating dark red and light tan colors, and features a mythical creature running right with a toothy open mouth, and is holding a sacrificial tumi with an extended arm. This creature also appears to be in flight, and there are also three symbols seen above the main body of this creature. The raised stirrup-spout also has dotted designs that match the dotted designs seen on the main body of the creature. The entire vessel is rendered with half of the vessel in dark red, and the other half in light tan colors, and this may represent day and night, and/or the living and the spirit world. An interesting Moche piece that is a reflection of human sacrifice that was a religious part of their culture. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1395146
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
These Bactrian Near Eastern and rare (50) fifty triangular fittings are carved from a hard limestone, and are approximately 2500-1800 B.C. These pieces are approximately .80-1.1 inches high, by .20 inches thick, and are all triangular shaped with a "notched rounded edge" that runs around the edge of each piece. These appealing and decorative pieces also have an attractive light to dark gray patina, and are all intact, save for five pieces that have repaired breaks. These pieces are in remarkable condition, as they could easily be damaged and/or shattered simply by dropping them on a hard surface, as they are relatively thin limestone plaques. The principle reason they are in their superb to mint quality "as found" condition, is that they were likely inlaid into an object such as a wooden box, a furniture piece, or possibly even the face of a wooden shield. A number of these pieces also have have a more pronounced patina on one side than the other, and this may also be an indication that these pieces were embedded into a perishable object as noted above. These pieces are a nice group of individually carved objects with a high degree of eye appeal. These pieces are also offered with a custom display case/frame, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1243639
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This massive and extremely rare piece is a Greek iron sarissa spear head that dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 4th century B.C., and is approximately 22.5 inches long by 2 inches wide at the blades mid point. This piece is intact, and is in superb condition with a hardened earthen over glaze which has helped to preserve this extremely rare iron weapon. The metal seen on this piece is for the most part very compact with very little flaking, and is in very stable and solid condition. The condition of this piece is remarkable, given the fact that it is made from iron, and not bronze. This piece is all the more remarkable, in that it has survived intact after sustaining substantial battle damage. This battle damage can be seen with the two bends in the blade, and a small part of the end of the shank which was moved out from the blow to the piece. The blow to the piece traveled from the tip end to the shank, and did not shatter the weapon, as the blow appears to have been on the side of the blade, thus causing the two bends in the blade and the small section at the end of the shank to move out and expand. This piece was likely carried by an infrantryman, and was fitted to a wooded shaft about 12-15 feet long. This heavy lance was carried with two hands, and is known as a "sarissa". This type of weapon was also developed by Philip II, who was the father of Alexander the Great, and was king of Macedonia circa 359-336 B.C. His military genius transformed his army with many innovative weapons and battle tactics, and the weapon offered here was one such weapon. The finest weapons during the Hellenistic period were iron, rather than bronze, and were forged and hand beaten into shape. These iron weapons were extremely sharp and durable, and iron swords from this period could easily take off a mans arm at the shoulder, and penetrate bronze shields. The fact that the piece offered here did not shatter during battle proves that this piece was hammered again, and again, to give it strength and durability. (For the Hellenistic Greek weapon types see "Greece and Rome at War", by Peter Connolly, United Kingdom, 1998.) This piece is extremely rare and is seldom seen in this condition on today's market. This piece comes with a custom metal stand and stands upright. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1315451
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This large and impressive piece is a Greek bronze horse that dates to the Geometric Period, circa 8th century B.C. This exceptional and large example is approximately 3.4 inches high, by 3.65 inches long. This complete piece is in superb condition, with no cracks and/or breaks, and the overall surface is very even with a beautiful dark green patina. There is some dark green/brown mineral deposits seen mostly on the bottom side of the base plate, and overall, this piece has a great deal of eye appeal due to it's beautiful dark green patina and even surfaces. This esoteric piece is designed with an elongated tail and legs, which are attached to the base plate that has ten triangular openings. The triangular openings in the base plate arranged into two rows, along with the base plate extension to accommodate for the attachment of the tail, stylistically point to a "Laconian" manufacture. (See another analogous "Laconian" example in "Glories of the Past: Ancient Art from the Shelby White and Leon Levy Collection", Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1990, no. 72.) The piece offered here also has a tubular designed torso and elongated nose, and the elongated nose has two raised mounds seen just in front of the ears that represent the eyes of the horse. The type of horse seen here may be the "Laconian Type" for the reasons noted above, but there are also no knobs seen on the legs that represent knee joints, and this type of design is seen mostly on the "Thessalian Type". The type of Greek geometric bronze horse offered here, with the openwork integral plinths, were votive offerings in the Geometric Period, and are found widespread throughout the ancient Greek world. However, large examples in the superb condition offered here are quite rare, and not often have the beautiful deep emerald green patina that is seen on this exceptional example. (Another analogous example of the same size and condition was also offered in Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2012, no. 61., $40,000.00-$60,000.00 estimates, $50,000.00 realized. See attached photo.) This beautiful piece also sits on a custom display stand. A large example, with great surfaces and a beautiful dark green patina, which together make this exceptional piece one of the finest examples available on the market today. Ex: Private English collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #853880
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This rare vessel is from the Moche culture, that dwelled in modern day northern Peru, dates circa 500-700 A.D. and is from the Moche IV phase of ceramic development. This piece is intact with no repair/restoration, is in mint quality condition, and is approximately 8.25 inches high. This red-brown and cream colored ceramic is a rare piece, as it is a type of vessel known as a "sacrificial rite vessel". This piece has six figures on the vessel including a Moche standing owl deity seen at the center, a sea lion, a cormorant, a hooded male figure, an ocean skate(?), and a crab. All of the five figures that run around the main body of this stirrup-type vessel are all seen emerging from the background, and may represent their emerging into or from the spirit world. These figures are seen in high relief from the main body of the vessel, as they were individually mold made, and this production process took a great deal of skill and time relative to intregrating these images into the production of this ceramic. The standing owl deity seen at the center, which may also represent a priest in costume, is also the Moche deity that is seen in the "Presentation Theme", which is a Moche ceremony of sacrifice as defined by Christopher Donnan. (See "Moche Art of Peru" by Christopher Donnan, University of California, Los Angeles, CA., 1978, pp.158-174.) This Moche owl deity, seen in the "Presentation Theme" as defined by Donnan which is also identified as "Figure B", is a priest seen in an owl-hooded costume holding a goblet with blood from the sacrifice. There are also other known Moche ceramic vessels that portray this figure, as seen in the work noted above (Nos. 248 and 271.). The owl was sacred to the Moche because of it's night vision and sharp hunting skills at night, and because of their nocturnal nature, they were associated with death and were thought to travel between the living and spirit world. There are examples of Moche ceramics with a captive tied to the back of the owl, and this may represent the owl carrying the captive to the other world. The standing owl, seen in combination with the five figures that run around the main body of this vessel, are all related to Moche ceremony and sacrifice. The active red-brown sea lion depicted on this piece shows several round objects, seen at the front of the eye and on the stomach area, and are round stones that the sea lions frequently cough up when they are hunted. These stones were considered sacred by the Moche and were thought to have extremely powerful medicinal properties. The lively artistic style of the sea lion is exceptional, and has a great deal of expression. The hooded male figure, seen at the front of the vessel, may represent a sacrificial victim. It is interesting to note that one of the owl's feet appear to grip and morph into the hood that is seen on the male figure that is placed just below the body of the owl. The crab is also interesting in that the crab has anthropomorphized human-like eyes. The owl is also thought to represent the "magical flight" ecstatic trance state that was performed by Moche shamans and priests. The owl seen on this vessel also has a human designed eye, and may represent a shaman and/or priest in costume, or is in a state of transformation. (This ecstatic trance state was first described in 1638 by Antonio de la Calancha, in the historical Spanish document "Cornica Moralizada del Orden de San Augustin en el Peru, Con Sucesos Egemplares an esta Monarquia", Barcelona, Spain.) The ceramic offered here may represent the owl as presiding over the Moche sacrifices that are offered to the other world, due to the many attributes of the Moche owl deity as noted above, and as such is known as a "sacrificial rite vessel". (One of the few examples of this type of vessel was offered by Arte Primitivo, New York, June 2005, no. 329, $12,000.00-$15,000.00 estimates. The vessel offered by Arte Primitivo is also red-brown and cream colored, 10.5 inches high, and is Moche IV phase. See attached photo.) Ex: S. Benger collection, Germany, circa 1970's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1333494
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This little gem is a Greek Attic black-glazed kantharos that dates circa 350-325 B.C. This piece is approximately 2.4 inches high, by 4.6 inches wide from handle to handle. This charming piece is intact, and is in mint quality condition with no repair/restoration. The lustrous black glaze is even around the vessel, and is seen both on the inner and outer surfaces. This piece has a "flat handled" design, and these handles have spurred edges, a looping design, and connect to the main body of the vessel. This piece sits on a torus foot, and there is no reserve underneath, as this piece is entirely covered in a black glaze. This dainty piece was also designed to imitate silver vessels of this type. This type of Attic black-glazed ceramic is also scarce to rare on the market, as it is a rare form. This piece has some spotty white calcite deposits, and a multi-colored iridescent patina. (Another analogous vessel of this type was offered by Charles Ede Limited, London, 2010, Catalog 182, no. 35 for 900.00 pounds.) For the type see, B. Sparkes and L. Talcott, "The Athenian Agora, Vol. XII, Black and Plain Pottery", Princeton, 1970, no. 701, fig. 7. Ex: Private U.K collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv. #091613-05. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1304587
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This attractive piece is a silver bowl that is Greco-Thracian, and dates circa 4th-3rd century B.C. This x-large piece is approximately 9.1 inches in diameter, by 2.4 inches high. This piece is intact, and is a complete example that has a nice dark gray patina with some spotty dark black deposits. In addition, there is some minute root marking and an attractive multi-colored iridescence that can be seen on various sections of the piece. This piece has a hand beaten "floral pattern" seen on the outer side, and the negative image of this design can also be seen on the inside inner surface. The "floral pattern" has a circular roundel center, and the tips of the individual pedals have semi-circular curves that were each hand stamped with a punch. This piece also has a rolled edge that folds towards the inside, and was heat sealed. There is also an attached single silver "ring handle" that is seen on one side near the top rim of the vessel. This single silver "ring handle" has a round attachment plate that has a decorative stamped semi-circular pattern as well. The silver ring itself is very durable, and is very thick which is a strong indicator that this piece was meant to have been hung, and may have been hung and used in a private home, on a wagon, or a horse. The ancient Thracians and Scythians valued vessels made from precious metals, and were also a mobile culture. This piece may have been produced in one of the Greek Thracian coastal cities, and was sold or traded to the interior, but the artistic style of this piece points to the region that runs around the eastern and northern coasts of the Black Sea. ( A silver bottle with an analogous floral pedal design and construction technique is seen in "Scythian Art" by Georges Charriere, Alpine Fine Arts Pub., 1979, no. 349. This silver bottle is attributed to the 4th century B.C., and is from modern day southern Ukraine. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is a rare example, and large silver vessels of this type are seldom seen on the market. Ex: Michael Ward Gallery, New York. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1236064
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This lively piece is a black ware Chimu ceramic that dates circa 900-1470 A.D. This piece is approximately 8.8 inches high, and is intact with no repair/restoration, and is in mint quality condition. This piece has an even deep black glaze, and has some white calcite deposits which are heavier in the low relief sections of the conical base. The conical base has three registers, which have impressed triangle and square designs, and the square boxes have "step-pyramid" designs seen within which are also artistic hallmarks of the Chimu culture. The head of this duck also has a very lively designed eye, and there are two molded legs seen below as well. This piece has a raised stirrup handle that is centered on the top section of the duck's body. This piece is an exceptional example of Chimu blackware, and is an excellent animal type Chimu ceramic. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection, Germany, circa 1970's. (Note additional documentation is available to the buyer, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1249809
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This vibrant piece is a Greek Attic Sessile Kantharos, that dates circa early 4th century B.C. This piece is also classified as being of the "Saint-Valentin Class". This attractive piece is approximately 4.9 inches high, by 6.5 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is repaired from several large tight fitting fragments, and is 100% original. What makes this piece better than most examples of this type, is that there is no glaze loss, and the bright glossy glazed surface is seen with a deep black, a bright white, and a vibrant light orange color. This piece has on each side a dotted checker-pattern, a band of laurel in added white, and vertical lines seen above and below. The dotted checker-pattern is very detailed, and is designed in a rectangular box like a tesserae floor mosaic. This piece also has a black dot pattern on the bottom, and a deep black glaze is seen within the vessel. There are also some white calcite deposits seen mostly on the bottom surface as well. Another analogous vessel of this type and condition is seen in Christie's Antiquities, "The Morven Collection of Ancient Art", New York, June 2004, no. 362. (See attached photo. $3,000.00-$5,000.00 estimates.) The piece offered here has an exceptional glossy surface with a detailed painted design, is a better example than most pieces of this type, and has a great deal of eye appeal. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #1313572
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This exceptional piece is a massive Roman glass bottle that dates circa 2nd century A.D. This piece is approximately 12.1 inches high, and is in flawless condition with no cracks and/or chips. This beautiful piece is a pale blue-green color, is free blown, and has a slightly indented "dimple base". This piece also has a long cylindrical neck that is constricted at the lower end, and has a flanged "roll-band" below the rounded rim. This "roll-band" was designed to act as an aid for a portable seal over the opening, such as an animal skin or textile seal. This large-scale piece was also likely a storage vessel for a precious oil or unguent. This piece has a beautiful multi-colored iridescent patina, exceptional smooth surfaces, and some minute root marking. Large-scale Roman blown glass vessels like this example took a great deal of skill to produce, and large-scale pieces with balanced symmetry like this example are rare on the market. In addition, flawless examples like this piece are also not often seen as well. A rare and exceptional large-scale piece that has an interesting design with a brilliant multi-colored patina. Ex: Private Geneva, Switzerland, collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2012, no. 138. ($6,000.00-$8,000.00 estimates.) Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1381367
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This intact vessel is a Greek Messapian lidded "lebes gamikos" vessel that dates circa 4th century B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 4.75 inches high, by 4.4 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is intact, with no repair and/or restoration, and is superb to mint quality, in addition to being in it's pristine "as found" condition. This piece has some minute root marking and light brown ground deposits, along with a beautiful light brown patina. This piece has two raised handles above the shoulder, a round pedestal base, and a lid with a raised knob in the shape and size of an olive. This piece also has dark brown decorative elements with concentric circles seen on the lid and upper shoulder, and a light brown slip is seen over the main body of the vessel. This dainty little piece is very esoteric and has a very attractive design, and was likely a storage vessel for seeds, olives, and/or grains. A very well made piece with a high degree of eye appeal. An old collection number (0045) is also seen under the lid and base of the vessel. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1940's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1254565
Apolonia Ancient Art
$765.00
This interesting piece is a Recuay culture standing warrior that dates to the Early Intermediate Period, circa 400 B.C.-300 A.D., and the Recuay culture was centered in the Northern Peruvian Highlands, Callejon de Huaylas Valley. This piece is approximately 5.8 inches high by 4.2 inches in diameter, and is in intact condition, save for some minor stress cracks that appear to be filled at the base. This piece was made with a "resist-decoration" technique, and is a thin-walled white/cream colored kaolin clay with red-orange, yellow, and black colored line-drawn highlights. This piece also has some attractive light brown burnishing, and some spotty black mineral deposits. This piece shows a very animated figure that appears to be a standing warrior, as he is seen wearing a helmet and probable body armor, which is built into the round and portly design of the main body of the vessel. This figure also appears to be holding some objects in each hand, and the object in his right hand may be a round fruit which he is seen lifting to his wide mouth. The artistic style of this piece is also very geometric in it's design, and the lower legs and feet of this warrior are also designed in high relief at the base of the vessel. This piece also has the typical single spout which is wide and funnel shaped, and is integrated in width and height relative to the head of the warrior, which makes it to be somewhat imperceptible at first glance. It is also likely that the Recuay were a satellite people of the Mochica, and perhaps were guardians of sacrificial llamas and were an elite group of warriors. The ceramic offered here may also have been designed with additional ceramics, which made up a group scene that was created as a ceremonial grave offering. (For the culture and the warrior-type ceramics, see A. Lapiner, "Pre-Columbian Art of South America", New York, 1976, pp. 167-169.) A scarce piece with nice eye appeal. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1388919
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This piece is a Moche seated prisoner that dates circa 200-500 A.D., and is approximately 12 inches high. This piece is intact with no repair and/or restoration, and has some minute spotty black mineral deposits. This piece also has a tan and brownish orange glaze. This piece is a seated prisoner that has a coiled rope around his neck, and has his hands bound at the back with rope ties. This prisoner is completely nude, save for his wearing a turban with a raised crescent ornament, and behind the raised crescent ornament, there is an open spout. The crescent ornament may also be a symbol of rank, and this prisoner may represent an important captive. The Moche also engaged in ritual combat in order to capture prisoners for sacrifice to their gods, and the seated prisoner seen here is portrayed while awaiting his fate. This may also explain the apparent forlorn expression that is seen on his face. This piece has nice eye appeal, and is an interesting example with the raised crescent turban. For the type see: Christopher Donnan, "Moche Art of Peru", University of California, Los Angeles, 1978. Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, May 1993, no. 191. Ex: Private Kansas collection, circa 1990's-2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1304362
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This attractive piece is a Greek Boeotian blackware kantharos, and dates circa 450-425 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.6 inches high, by 7.5 inches wide from handle to handle, and is a large example. This esoteric piece has a nice even lustrous black glaze, with a multi-colored iridescent patina over the glaze, and a high degree of eye appeal. This Greek kantharos is a Classic Period type vessel, as can be seen with the two looped handles and the long stemmed base, and this piece is also classified as being a "Type A" type due to this design. This type of piece is also seen on many Greek Classical Period coins and painted ceramics. This type of vessel was used for drinking wine at drinking parties which is known as a "symposium", and was also used for ceremonial offerings. This superb and beautiful piece is intact, and has some spotty white calcite deposits seen in various sections of the piece, and is heavy at the inner bottom of the vessel. There is also some minor roughness seen in sections of the inner bowl, otherwise this piece is in near flawless condition. This piece also have a deep even black glaze seen on the inner and outer surfaces, and there are no pressure cracks and/or repair seen anywhere on this vessel. (Another analogous example was offered at Christie's Antiquities, London, Oct. 2011, no. 71. This piece was approximately 11 inches high, with a faint painted white ivy tendril that runs around the main body of the vessel. $4,600.00-$7,500.00 estimates, $9,246.00 realized.) (Another analogous example can be seen in the Louvre Museum, Paris, Inv. no. MNC 670, and bears an incised inscription that is a sacred dedication. The lengthy inscription is in the Boeotian alphabet, and this vessel is thought to have come from Thespiae.) The attractive piece offered here is scarce to rare in this intact condition, and is seldom offered on the market. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1331717
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This extremely rare weapon is a bronze mace/sword that dates circa 1800-1200 B.C. This piece is approximately 17.5 inches long, by 2 inches wide at it's widest point, which is near the tip end of the weapon. This piece was hand forged from bronze, and is a thick and heavy bronze weapon. This piece also graduates in thickness from the shank end to the tip of the weapon, and at the tip of the weapon, this heavy weapon is approximately .32 inches thick. This piece was made as a combination mace and a "blunt-ended" type sword, which had devastating effect on heavily armed warriors that had helmets and other body armor. This weapon was designed to crush helmets with it's blunt end, and penetrate armor with sheer force. This piece also has an attachment hole near the tip end which was likely used to hold a leather tie that was used either to hang or suspend the weapon for use. This piece likely did not fit into a scabbard, as the shape of this weapon with the curved end would not easily fit into a scabbard as a straight blade can. In addition, this extremely rare weapon either had a handle attached to the shank for use with one hand, or it may have had an extended wooden shaft attached to the shank that was used by the warrior with two hands. An extended handle of this type would generate a tremendous amount of force, and it may be that a weapon of this type was used by a warrior in a war chariot or from horseback. There is also the possibility that if this weapon had an extended handle, it may have been used by infantry against mounted or chariot forces in order to crush their heavy armor. This weapon may also be of a type that was also used in the battle of Kadesh, circa 1274 B.C., which was the largest chariot battle ever fought in antiquity, and involved perhaps 5,000-6,000 war chariots. This battle pitted the Hittite Empire under Muwatalli II against the Egyptian Empire under Ramesses II, and many types of weapons were created by both sides for this conflict. The metal composition of this impressive weapon has sections with striated surfaces, and this type of metal composition does match other Egyptian bronze weaponry from the period, and the form of this weapon is somewhat analogous to the Egyptian sickle sword known as a "khopesh". This type of weapon was also designed to pull with a hook at the end, stab with it's pointed end, and slice with it's curved blade. This "khopesh" is a muti-purpose designed weapon, as the mace/sword weapon offered here, and both of these types of weapons could be used several ways in battle. The mace/sword weapon offered here has a "flat mace edge" on one side that is for a crushing application, and the other side has a "blunt sword edge" for a cutting and slicing application. This piece also has several dark brown and green mineral deposits seen in various sections of the piece, and some spotty red and dark brown highlights within the metal. This piece is also 100% intact, and has no repair/restoration. Overall, this complete piece is an extremely rare weapon that is highly specialized, is one of the most devastating weapons from antiquity, and is a weapon that has seldom been on the market. A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1358352
Apolonia Ancient Art
$8,675.00
This exceptional Mayan plate has a great deal of eye appeal, and dates circa 600-700 A.D. This large example is approximately 12.75 inches in diameter, by 3.25 inches high, and is intact with no repair/restoration. This attractive piece has a polychrome glaze on the upper inner surfaces that is seen with very vibrant orange, black, white, and light red colors. This piece also has some attractive minute root marking and some spotty black mineral deposits. The bottom side of the plate is a light tan terracotta with three rounded legs with rattles within, and the "shoulder line" seen on the underside is very sharp and well defined. The top inner surface displays a stylized bust facing left of "God K", otherwise known as "K'awil", who is seen with an elongated nose, ear-flares, an elaborate smoking-mirror headdress, and a line-designed mouth. "God K" was one of the Mayan gods of greatest importance, and was associated with the natural elements linked to agricultural activities such as rain and thunder. The stylized bust is surrounded by four smoking scrolls that also refer to the four "cardinal directional points" that were sacred to the Maya. The entire bust design is also rendered with a stylized "circle-and-dot pattern" which also has filled colors within the circles, and this design type is of an artistic style that is associated with the Peten region. (For the design type, see a bowl published in: "Maya, Treasures of an Ancient Civilization", Abrams Pub., 1985, no. 122. See attached photo.) This piece also has a large black glyph band that frames the inner bust of "God K", and this contains glyphs that are associated with the "PSS" (Primary Standard Sequence) that was identified by Michael Coe. This glyph band was also painted by a very accomplished painter. Overall, this piece is an exceptional example of Mayan art that is also in superb to mint condition. Ex: Ferdinand Anton collection, Germany, circa 1959. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1301382
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This scarce piece is a Roman bronze ring that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and features a reclined woman (Leda) with a swan on top. This Roman erotic type piece is approximately ring size 6 (16mm inner diameter), and was likely made for a young woman or girl. This piece is intact, has no repair/restoration, and is a solid bronze cast piece that can be worn today. This piece also has an attractive dark green patina that is an even color over the entire piece. This piece is in superb to mint condition, and has no wear on the outer surface, with only some slight wear on the inner surface of the hoop. This piece features a nude and reclined woman (Leda) who is seen reclined to the left, raised on her elbows, and has a swan positioned between her bent knees. The swan has his wings outstretched above, and has his neck looped up and down with his head kissing a breast. The piece offered here depicts the Greek myth of "Leda and the Swan", in which Zeus in the form of a Swan makes love to Leda, who gave birth to two sets of twins, one of each pair being mortal and immortal. One set of the twins was male, Castor and Pollux, and the other female, Helen and Clytemnestra. This ancient Greek myth was extremely popular in the Hellenistic Period, circa 3rd-2nd century B.C., and continued down into the Roman Imperial Period. A Roman carved gem, dated circa 3rd century A.D., showing the exact scene seen on the piece offered here, is seen in Christie's Ancient Jewelry, New York, Dec. 2004, no. 160. ($4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates. See attached photo.) The relief of the figures seen on the piece offered is very high, and are very clear. The entire scene was also stamped into the flat top bezel of the ring, and the main body of the ring was cast as one solid piece. The design seen on this ring would have have been made like an ancient Greek or Roman bronze coin, and in both cases, the designs were stamped and struck with a carved punch die. The stamp punch die, for the erotic design seen here, may also have been used for additional rings and other objects as well. In addition, this ring may have been worn by an individual who was connected with the ancient Roman sex trade, and this ring may have served as an identifying symbol for the individual who wore this scarce ring. A ring such as this erotic type, would also have likely been worn by many individuals who lived in a city with a prevalent sex trade such as Pompeii. This piece also comes with a ring stand display base, and can easily be removed. Ex: Joel Malter collection, circa 1980's, Los Angeles, CA. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #579338
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,625.00
This x-large Roman glass jug dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 7.5 inches high by 5.8 inches in diameter. This beautiful piece is also in mint condition, with no stress cracks and/or chips. This pleasing light green vessel has beautiful multi-colored iridescence and nice minute root marking. There are also five decorative wheel-cut (lathe) bands that run around the main body of the piece, and these bands may also have served as a measurement indicator of the level of the contained liquid. This was likely the case, as the five cut bands are evenly spaced on the vessel. There is also a thick strap handle that was applied to the upper shoulder and below the lip. The lip of this attractive vessel was also turned out and down, which formed a rounded edge. (For an analogous example, see Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2001, no.213. This vessel is approximately 9.25 inches high, and has eleven decorative wheel-cut bands, three of which are deeply cut. $20,000.00-$30,000.00 estimates, and realized $23,500.00. Another recent comparable sold at Cristie's Antiquities, London, April 2010, no. 98, for 5625 Pounds, approximately $7600.00, and had 5,700-7,900 pounds estimates. This vessel is approximately 6.5 inches high and is a light green color with six decorative wheel-cut bands. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is an exceptional large example of early Roman blown glass, is very analogous to the two examples noted above, and is scarce in this mint quality condition. Ex: Private English collection. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1276518
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This piece is a scarce Greek Mycenaean bronze double-ax head that dates circa 1400-1200 B.C. This piece is approximately 6.3 inches long, by 2.25 inches high near the end of each blade. This piece is very solid, as it was cast as one piece, and because of it's heavy weight, it was well served as a heavy battle ax. This piece also had added strength, as the inner shank design is "V" shaped, and is not a round circle as most examples of this type have. This "V" designed inner shank provided for added strength relative to it's attachment to the shaft, and this design made this a powerful weapon, as this design gave added leverage to the warrior while striking a blow. This design also points to the fact that this piece was likely made for battle, rather than being made purely as a votive object after the death of the warrior. However, there is a strong possibility that this piece not only may have served in battle, but it was also used as a votive offering as well. This weapon was the principle weapon of the Mycenaean Greeks and was probably used during the Trojan War. This type of bronze weapon is also scarce to rare, because bronze during this period was very valuable, and bronze objects that were damaged and/or had lost their utility were often melted down into another bronze weapon or object. The shape of this heavy battle ax may have originated in Crete with the Minoan culture, circa 2000 B.C., as double-ax head weapons and plaques have been excavated at Knossos. This shape may also refer to the Minoan bull-jumping cult, as the ends of the double-ax may have represented the horns of the bull. A number of votive gold double-axes, found in Arkalochori in Crete, are of the same shape as the example offered here. This piece has a beautiful dark green/blue patina with some heavy dark green/brown mineral deposits, and is in mint to superb "as found" condition with no breaks. This piece also has a relatively sharp blade edge, and there is little or no wear over the entire piece. For the type see "Greek, Etruscan, and Roman Bronzes in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston", by M. Comstock and C. Vermeule III, 1971, no. 1630. The example offered here is very analogous to the example sold in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2002, no. 18. ($5,000.00-$8,000.00 estimates, $5,975.00 realized. See attached photo.) Another example was offered by Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, for $7500.00. (See the exhibit catalog "Venerable Traditions", published Nov. 2007, no. 26. See attached photo.) Another example was also offered by Charles Ede Ltd., London, published in Greek Antiquities, 2006, no. 37. (4,000.00 Pound estimate.) The attractive piece offered here sits on a custom display stand, and can easily lift off. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, circa 2000-2014. Inv.# P33-039-101514c. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1333672
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
These ten little miniature Corinthian ceramics date circa 600-550 B.C., and are miniature ceramics that are votive in nature. They are approximately .75 inches high, by 2.8 inches wide for the near identical five (5) skyphoi; 1.5 inches high, by 2.5 inches wide for the larger skyphos; 1.2 inches high, by 1.25 inches wide for the two kantharos; 1.25 inches high, by 1.8 inches wide for the smaller hydria; and 2.9 inches high, by 2.5 inches wide for the larger hydria. One of the kantharos and the larger hydria have a black glaze, and the balance of the pieces have a light tan buff surface, with some added dark brown and light red line design. These miniature pieces are scarce on the market, as they are votive, and reflect a trend in Corinthian pottery production of miniature vessels that seem to have been created exclusively as votives. Their small size precludes any practical use or function, and various examples of skyphoi and other vessel shapes have been found in a variety of sanctuaries and sacred places. These type of pieces have also played a role in the ritual activity at these sites. These pieces are all intact, save for a missing handle on one of the kantharos, and some minute chips seen on the larger hydria. Overall, these ten pieces are a superb group that also has some light mineral deposits and root marking, and best represent a sacred ritual as there are three different ceramic types seen within the group. (Another group of seven pieces was sold at Sotheby's Antiquities, London, Feb. 1987, no. 227. 800-100 pounds estimates.) These pieces also come with a custom display stand. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1378394
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This scarce piece is an Egyptian faience two-faced amulet bust that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.25 inches high, and is an intact example. This piece was originally made as a figurine of the Egyptian god Pataikos, and has an attractive light green glaze. This interesting piece has nearly two identical "mold-made" faces seen on each side of the bust in a "Janus" type design. This appealing Egyptian bust also shows the two faces sharing the same bald head, and these faces have deeply molded features that convey a slight smile and serene expression. This piece was likely made as a "protector" type work of art, and may also have doubled as the god Bes and Pataikos, thus having additional protective powers. The Egyptian god Pataikos was derived from a Phoenician "dwarf-form", and was a "protector" type god which is also sometimes referred to as a "Ptah-Seker" god. Pataikos was also a popular god in ancient Egypt, and was always present among the workers in precious-metal workshops in Old Kingdom scenes of daily life. The piece seen here was also likely to have been intentionally and ceremoniously broken in antiquity, which subsequently killed the magic of the piece. This scarce piece is in superb condition, has a nice colored glaze, and is a large example for the type. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1375947
Apolonia Ancient Art
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These pieces are nineteen (19) Egyptian faience glazed amulets that are from the Amarna-Period, Late New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, circa 1350 B.C., and also date to the reign of Akhenaten and Tutankhamun. These interesting and attractive pieces range in size from approximately .9 to .25 inches high, and are all intact, save one plaque amulet that has a chip on one side. Nine (9) of the amulets have a minute suspension hoop at the top, and were likely strung together on a necklace or interwoven into a garment. The remaining amulets were likely interwoven and/or wrapped into a garment, and may have also been interwoven into the wrappings of a mummy, as this was likely the case for all of the amulets offered here. The amulets vary in type, glaze color, and size which makes them a very interesting study group. A lotus flower, a palmette, a Wedjat-eye, a seated Sekhmet, and a Hes-Vase represent some of the examples offered here. Many of these amulet types are seen in "Amulets of Ancient Egypt" by Carol Andrews, University of Texas Press, 1994. The mold made amulets offered here also range in color from a bright blue glaze to a dark purple-blue color. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1338092
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This rare to extremely rare piece is a Greek Apulian-Gnathia alabastron that dates circa 350-330 B.C., and is approximately 7.6 inches high. This type of vessel is also referred to as an aryballos, but due to its cylindrical shape, it is classified as an alabastron. This piece is extremely rare as it follows the slightly earlier Greek Apulian types in form, but it also combines the extremely rich floral decorations that are seen on the subsequent Greek Gnathian type ceramics. This piece is therefore classified as an Apulian-Gnathian type of ceramic, and the high degree of art and form for this culture makes it an extremely rare to rare example. This piece has a beautiful and detailed young woman, likely Persephone, that is seen emerging from the floral elements that are seen rinsing up from the ground. For the ancient Greeks, Persephone represented the change of seasons and eternal life, as she returned from the underworld every spring to regenerate the earth. The detail of Persephone, and the floral elements seen to the right and left of the bust seen on this vessel are exquisite. This piece may also be attributed to the "Toledo Painter", who was one of the more accomplished painters for the period who utilized extensive floral elements and detailed faces as seen on this beautiful piece. This piece also has a flat designed opening, which also was an aid in controlling the flow of precious oil. This piece has a lustrous black glaze, and vibrant white, yellow, and light brown colors. The vibrant white color of the bust of Persephone also pops out from the black background, and can easily be seen from a great distance. This piece is also intact with no repair and/or restoration, and is in mint condition. There are some spotty light white calcite deposits seen in various sections, and the black glaze is deep and even over the entire piece. This piece also easily stands by itself, and is a remarkable and beautiful example of an ancient Greek ceramic. (For the type see "The Art of South Italy: Vases from Magna Graecia by Margaret Mayo, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, 1982, nos. 55-56 and 128-129.) Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva, circa 1990's. Ex: Private Swiss collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1376088
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This pleasing piece is an early Moche culture portrait vessel, and dates to the Moche I Period, circa 300-100 B.C. This piece is approximately 8.5 inches high, by 6 inches wide from ear to ear, and is intact with no repair/restoration. This mint quality example is an unglazed red terracotta, and has a light gray/white wash that was applied to sections of the vessel. This piece also has a raised stirrup handle centered at the top, large staring eyes, a small clenched mouth, sculpted ears, and the majority of the face is covered with the gray/white wash. This wash also lends this portrait vessel a serene expression that has a great deal of eye appeal. This vessel is also one of the earliest Moche portrait vessels, and is the prototype for the subsequent and more numerous Moche portrait vessels. Another analogous example of this rare vessel was offered in Lempertz Pre-Columbian Art, Brussels, Jan. 2010, no. 98. (7,000.00-10,000.00 Euro estimates. See attached photo.) For the type see: Donnan, Christopher, "Moche Portraits from Ancient Peru", China, 2004, no. 27. Ex: Private German collections, circa 1950's and 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: