Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1354392
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This superb piece is a Greek bronze oinochoe that dates circa mid 5th century B.C. This complete piece is approximately 6 inches high, and is an intact example with no repair/restoration. This intact piece is in superb to mint condition, with only some very minor scrapes and minute dents, which makes it much better than what is normally seen on the market. This piece has a flat bottom and easily stands by itself, and has a graceful upper shoulder and extended neck that runs up into a trefoil spout. This piece also has an added handle that is solid, and attaches to the main body of the piece and at the top of the trefoil spout. This piece was hand beaten from one sheet of bronze and graduates in thickness from the bottom to the spout lip which is at it's thinnest point. The piece also has a beautiful and even dark green patina with some dark brown, light blue, and red highlights, and in addition, there is some attractive minute root marking. The workmanship of this piece is exceptional, and this piece has a very graceful and compact shape. The shape and/or form of this vessel is also seen relative to numerous ceramic examples that copy it's graceful size and shape. This piece was used for fine dining, and likely held a concentrated wine that was mixed with water. This piece also made it very easy to pour a liquid, as the trefoil spout could pour a liquid in three directions. A piece with a great deal of eye appeal, and is scarce in the market in this superb condition. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is included for the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1388919
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This piece is a Moche seated prisoner that dates circa 200-500 A.D., and is approximately 12 inches high. This piece is intact with no repair and/or restoration, and has some minute spotty black mineral deposits. This piece also has a tan and brownish orange glaze. This piece is a seated prisoner that has a coiled rope around his neck, and has his hands bound at the back with rope ties. This prisoner is completely nude, save for his wearing a turban with a raised crescent ornament, and behind the raised crescent ornament, there is an open spout. The crescent ornament may also be a symbol of rank, and this prisoner may represent an important captive. The Moche also engaged in ritual combat in order to capture prisoners for sacrifice to their gods, and the seated prisoner seen here is portrayed while awaiting his fate. This may also explain the apparent forlorn expression that is seen on his face. This piece has nice eye appeal, and is an interesting example with the raised crescent turban. For the type see: Christopher Donnan, "Moche Art of Peru", University of California, Los Angeles, 1978. Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, May 1993, no. 191. Ex: Private Kansas collection, circa 1990's-2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1327483
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This superb Greek vessel is a silver plate and/or shallow bowl that dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 3rd-1st century B.C. This piece is approximately 1.7 inches high, by 7 inches in diameter, by 1/16th inch thick on the average. This scarce piece has a dark gray patina, with some spotty dark black and brown mineral deposits that are seen on both sides of the vessel, and in addition, is an intact mint quality vessel in "as found" condition. This piece is a solid, thick, and heavy silver plate and/or shallow bowl that has a beaded hammered edge, and has a slightly oval form. There is also a single attached silver ring handle that easily moves up and down within it's flat "leaf-shaped" mount. This allowed this plate and/or bowl to be hung either in a room, or in a mobile fashion from a wagon or horse. This piece was hammered over a mold, and has very minute micro marks and root marking. The overall design of this vessel is rare, especially with the added ring handle which appears to be original with this vessel. Greek silver vessels of this type with the added ring handle are also thought to be Greco-Thracian, and were often produced in Greek coastal centers for export. An analogous example is seen in "Silver for the Gods", Toledo Museum exhibition catalog, 1977, p. 82, no. 45. This piece is an exceptional heavy example for the type, and has nice eye appeal. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1395146
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
These Bactrian Near Eastern and rare (50) fifty triangular fittings are carved from a hard limestone, and are approximately 2500-1800 B.C. These pieces are approximately .80-1.1 inches high, by .20 inches thick, and are all triangular shaped with a "notched rounded edge" that runs around the edge of each piece. These appealing and decorative pieces also have an attractive light to dark gray patina, and are all intact, save for five pieces that have repaired breaks. These pieces are in remarkable condition, as they could easily be damaged and/or shattered simply by dropping them on a hard surface, as they are relatively thin limestone plaques. The principle reason they are in their superb to mint quality "as found" condition, is that they were likely inlaid into an object such as a wooden box, a furniture piece, or possibly even the face of a wooden shield. A number of these pieces also have have a more pronounced patina on one side than the other, and this may also be an indication that these pieces were embedded into a perishable object as noted above. These pieces are a nice group of individually carved objects with a high degree of eye appeal. These pieces are also offered with a custom display case/frame, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1306126
Apolonia Ancient Art
$985.00
These three Roman vessels are from the northern reaches of the empire, and date circa 3rd-early 4th century A.D. These three pieces are approximately 3.4, 3.5, and 4.5 inches high, and are all in flawless mint quality condition. These pieces are made from a tan terracotta, and have "strap designed" handles that are attached to the rim and main body of each vessel. There are some attractive spotty white calcite deposits and root marking seen on various sections of the vessels, and the bottom half of each vessel flares to a small and elegant round circular flat base. These esoteric designed pieces likely served as daily tableware vessels, and were likely used for wine and water. There are two cups with a single strap handle, and a larger three-handled storage vessel that may have held a grain product. These matching pieces were also produced in the Rhineland area, possibly in or near the Roman stronghold Trier, which was also a thriving ceramic production center. Ceramics of the type offered here were exported over a wide geographical region, and were popular in the western and northern reaches of the empire. The ceramics offered here are also very thin walled, and were produced with a very high firing temperature. This firing technique not only produced a fine ceramic that was very light, but also one that is very durable. Trier was also known for producing fine thin walled ceramics in antiquity, and the city was also the location where Constantine the Great established his summer residence, circa 306 A.D., and Trier subsequently became the capital of Rome's Western Empire. The pieces offered here have parallels that are classified as being circa 3rd century A.D., and are seen in "Pottery of the Roman Period. The Athenian Agora Vol. V.", by H.S. Robinson, Princeton, 1959, no. M191. These pieces are scarce on the market, as they are a matching set and are in near mint condition. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1990's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1278900
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This rare Roman bronze figurine is a standing gladiator that dates circa 1st-early 2nd century A.D. This bronze figurine is approximately 3.4 inches high, and is mounted on a custom display stand. This animated figurine is a standing gladiator, who is seen raising his left arm to the brim of his helmet, and has his left leg raised as if it is resting on his adversary. His raised left arm may be a signal either to spare or kill his adversary who is perhaps laying injured on the ground. The animated pose of the gladiator depicted here, with his raised arm and hand signal, is scarce to rare relative to Roman bronze gladiator figurines of this type, and is seldom seen on the market. The gladiator depicted here is also a "Murmillo" type, as he is seen wearing a "Cassis Crista", which is a broad-rimmed helmet based on the prior Greek Boeotian type, and the large helmet seen here has an enclosed double face visor, a forward raised crested plume, rounded eye visors, and decorative minute fish scale elements that are seen on the outer bowl. The helmet also has some minute details showing the double opening for the face visor, and this helmet is classified as the "Pompeii G Type", which is rarely seen on Roman bronze gladiatorial figurines as the more common "Berlin G Type". Early gladiatorial helmets, including the ones found at Pompeii, had round eye apertures for the eyes, and were often screened with removable round or semi-circular grating plates, and in addition, the visor grating also consisted of two halves that joined at the front, forming a vertical rib as seen on the exceptional example offered here. The helmet details noted above, relative to the "Pompeii G Type", are seldom seen on Roman bronzes of this type, and is another feature that makes this piece a very desirable example. This figurine is also seen wearing an arm guard on his right arm which is known as a "Manica", which was usually made of thick cotton quilt, leather, and some metal alloys. This gladiator is also seen holding a short sword in his right hand known as a "Gladius", and protective greaves on both shins. In addition, his right leg is seen wrapped with a protective covering which was used to kick at his adversary, and he is wearing a wide leather belt known as a "Balteus". This figurine also appears to be bare chested as well. There is also a palm branch "Palma" seen on his back side, and this was an award for victory in the arena. On receiving his awards, the gladiator made a lap of honor around the arena, waving his palm branch. (See "Gladiator: Rome's Bloody Spectacle" by Konstantin Nossov, Osprey Pub., United Kingdom, 2009.) The name "Murmillo" is derived from "Mormylos", meaning "seafish", and is sometimes spelled "Myrmillo". This name also alludes to the fish-scale design seen on the outer bowl of the helmet seen here. The "Murmillo" usually fought the "Thraex" or the "Hoplomachus", with whom he shared some of the equipment (notibly the arm guards, the all-enclosing helmet, and the dangerous "Gladius" short sword). The "Murmillo" fighting style was best suited for a man with large muscular arms and strong heavy shoulders that were needed to carry the weight of his shield and sword. Men who played the "Murmillo" were usually shorter and more muscular than most gladiators. The "Murmillo" depended on his strength and endurance to survive the battle against foes who were lighter armed and were suited for attacking. The figurine seen here also appears to be a short, muscular individual. The piece offered here is complete, save for the lower feet that are broken off, and this may have been done as this piece may have been a votive offering, and the breaking of the lower feet would keep the magic and spirit of the figurine in the grave. There also appears to be a shield hanging under the left arm, and a small fragment of this is missing. Overall, the condition of this piece is superb, and has nice detail with a nice even dark green patina, with minute spotty red highlights. (An analogous piece, without the minute detail that the piece offered here displays, was offered in Christie's Antiquities, London, Oct. 2003, lot. 13. Approximately 3.1 inches high, $3,400.00-$5,100.00 estimates, $5,593.00 realized.) The piece offered here has also been mounted on a custom display stand, and is a rare type seldom seen on the market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1310457
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This interesting piece is a Greek Attic "Red-Figure" kylix that dates circa 480-470 B.C. This piece is approximately 3.6 inches high, and is 10 inches wide from handle to handle. This nice Attic ceramic is classified as a "Red-Figured, Type C" kylix, and is attributed to the "Painter of London D12", who is a rare Attic painter that is seldom seen on the market. This piece is intact, save for an ancient break in the stem section of the stemmed footed base, and was repaired in antiquity with a bronze and lead pin. It's quite possible that this piece was broken in antiquity while playing the drinking game "kottabos", which was played at a drinking party known as a "symposium". This game was played by spinning the kylix on the index finger in order to fling the wine dregs swirling in the bottom of the cup onto a target in the room. Obviously, many kylix drinking cups were broken while playing this game. The ancient bronze and lead pin is approximately 2 inches long, and reattached the stemmed base to the main body of the piece. One end of the pin can also be seen on the inner surface in the middle of the tondo, and the other end can be seen centered within the stemmed base on the bottom side. The original owner must have thought enough of this attractive piece to have had it repaired for use again. This piece has a seated young man facing right within the round tondo, and is seen wearing a himation (cloak). The facial details of this young man are very detailed, and his pleasing young face is easily seen. The cloak also has curved definition lines, and a single thick black line that defines the garment edge, and both of these artistic features are artistic features of the early 5th century. It's quite possible that this piece may be attributed to an earlier painter such as "Makron", due to the artistic features noted above, rather than a slightly later painter such as the "Painter of London D12". The exterior surface has a lustrous black glaze, and overall, this piece has a great deal of eye appeal, and is an exceptional piece that is also a scarce example with an ancient repair. Ex: Christie's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 1994, no. 109. ($4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates. See attached photo.) Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1004703
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This scarce extremely large piece is a Greek blackware guttos that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 4th century B.C. This attractive vessel is approximately 6.75 inches high, by 6 inches wide from the top of the spout to the opposite side. This piece is intact, and is in mint condition with no repair/restoration. The surface of this exceptional piece also has a nice multi-colored iridescent patina, along with a rich glossy black glaze, and in addition, there is some spotty and minute white calcite deposits. This piece is an extremely large example for the type, and there is no glaze loss and cracking which is usually seen as well. This vessel has an extended trumpeted spout, a looped handle, detailed attractive ribbed sides, and a roundel of a grimacing facing Silenus head with wild billowing hair. Silenus was a woodland deity in ancient Greek mythology, and this piece shows his image very well as the unruly companion of Dionysus. This roundel that features a vibrant facing Silenus head that was mold made, and has very high relief, as it is approximately .75 inches high. This type of vessel likely held precious oil, and was used in ceremony as well as for everyday use. There is only one opening into the vessel through the spout, and the looped handle gave one exact control over the liquid. The extended round footed base of this piece gave this vessel an added capacity for liquids, and Greek guttos vessels of this type usually do not have this added design feature. This large piece may have also been produced in Athens for export, and this type of vessel was also made in the Greek colonies of southern Italy. An intact and scarce x-large vessel that is seldom seen the market, and is one of the best recorded examples for he type. Ex: Fortuna Fine Art, New York, circa 1990's-2000's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1333494
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This little gem is a Greek Attic black-glazed kantharos that dates circa 350-325 B.C. This piece is approximately 2.4 inches high, by 4.6 inches wide from handle to handle. This charming piece is intact, and is in mint quality condition with no repair/restoration. The lustrous black glaze is even around the vessel, and is seen both on the inner and outer surfaces. This piece has a "flat handled" design, and these handles have spurred edges, a looping design, and connect to the main body of the vessel. This piece sits on a torus foot, and there is no reserve underneath, as this piece is entirely covered in a black glaze. This dainty piece was also designed to imitate silver vessels of this type. This type of Attic black-glazed ceramic is also scarce to rare on the market, as it is a rare form. This piece has some spotty white calcite deposits, and a multi-colored iridescent patina. (Another analogous vessel of this type was offered by Charles Ede Limited, London, 2010, Catalog 182, no. 35 for 900.00 pounds.) For the type see, B. Sparkes and L. Talcott, "The Athenian Agora, Vol. XII, Black and Plain Pottery", Princeton, 1970, no. 701, fig. 7. Ex: Private U.K collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv. #091613-05. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1357519
Apolonia Ancient Art
$725.00
This scarce piece is a Greek bronze knife handle in the shape of an amphora, and dates to the Geometric Period, circa 800-700 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.75 inches high, by .75 inches wide, by .2 inches thick. This piece is a solid example and was cast as one piece, and is intact with no restoration/repair. This piece is in the shape of a wine amphora, which has two handles attached to the upper shoulder, a fluted neck, and a wide rim. In addition, the lower body of the amphora displays a knobbed base. This piece is also decorated with several "punched concentric circles", which are also seen on both sides of the piece. This decorative element is a hallmark design of the Greek Geometric Period, and is seen on many bronzes from the period that display flat surfaces. There are also incised lines that cross over the body of the amphora. This attractive piece also served as a knife handle, and iron filling from the missing iron blade can still be seen within the opening at the top of the piece. This piece was likely a shaving razor, or perhaps held a punch tool extension. This piece also has an attractive light to dark green patina, with some spotty dark blue highlights. This piece also fits on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. This piece can also be worn and fitted as a pendant, and this may also have been the case in antiquity. Ex: Fortuna Fine arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1394151
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This spiritual piece is a Huari double-spout vessel that dates circa 800-1000 A.D., and is approximately 6.2 inches high, by 5.4 inches in diameter. This piece is painted with vibrant colors in reddish-brown, cream, gray, and black colors. This piece shows a flying avain (parrot?) on each side, and is seen over a reddish-brown background. The bottom half of this vessel is painted with a dark gray color, along with the two raised spouts. This type of vessel is also known as a "bridge type" vessel, as there is a handle that is seen between both of the raised spouts. This piece is a "spiritual type" vessel, as the avains portrayed appear to be in flight, and/or are seen in the spirit world. The design of the piece also has geometric line design, and this is also an artistic hallmark of this culture. The main body of this vessel is intact, save for the bridge handle that was re-attached to both of the raised spouts, and this repair appears to be quite old, and was likely done 25 plus years ago. The thick glaze on this vessel is also intact, save for one side that has some minor losses. Overall, this vessel is in extremely fine condition, and is a nice example for the type. An analogous example was sold in Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, May 27, 1998, no. 257A. ($1,000.00-$1,500.00 estimates, $1,610 realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that the piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #824649
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This interesting piece is from the Jama-Coaque culture that lived in the tropical forest coast region of northern Ecuador near the Esmeraldas River. This area is also the region where the Spaniards first encountered the native South Americans. The piece offered here is approximately 10 inches high, dates circa 500 B.C.-500 A.D., and is intact, save for some missing coffee bean ends seen on the headdress and a very small section of the headdress behind the right ear, and this may have been done as this piece was a burial offering. These breaks appear to be very old, as there is wear in the break areas with burial deposits, and this may have been done to break the "mana" and/or magic of the piece for burial. The seated figurine may be a shaman that is seen wearing a headdress, shirt, earrings, and nose ring that are decorated with coffee bean symbols. He also has coffee bean designed eyes and is seen holding a lime pot in his right hand and in his left, a coca pod. (For the type see: "Pre-Columbian Art" by Jose Alcina Franch, Abrams Pub., New York, 1983, no. 595.) There are traces of painted designs seen on the lower legs, headdress, and skirt. This piece has spotty black mineral deposits and some minute root marking. An example and type that is now scarce on the market. Ex: Private Arizona collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Howard Rose collection, New York, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #872310
Apolonia Ancient Art
$265.00
This interesting Roman bronze coin is a bronze Sestertius, and was minted circa 60-68 A.D., and depicts a bust of Nero, who was in power circa 54-68 A.D. This coin is approximately 37mm in diameter, is Very Good quality, and has a nice dark green patina with heavy dark green/brown deposits. There are also four holes seen on this piece, and this likely facilitated leather ties which allowed this piece to be fitted into a composite corslet as scale armour. (See attached drawing.) This type of of Roman armour is known, but is extremely rare, and was not often manufactured by the Romans, although the blending of metal leaves interwoven with fabric, was known by the Greeks as early as the 12th century B.C. in Cyprus. (See "Warfare in Ancient Greece" by Tim Everson, Sutton Pub., United Kingdom, 2004, p. 154-155.) This piece could have served as armour during this period, as Rome had a brief, but quick civil war with four Emperors circa 68-69 A.D. This piece also has a deep mark in the center of the coin that was probably a test cut, rather than a battle mark. The test cut was done in order to test that the metal was 100% bronze, rather than a bronze plated "fourree". This test cut was also probably done when this coin was no longer in circulation, and could have been struck circa 68 A.D., when Nero was replaced by Galba. This coin is an interesting piece that had a dual utility. A custom black plexiglas stand is included, and the piece is easily removable as it is attached with clay. Ex: Private English collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #665966
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This Roman bronze portrait bust dates circa 2nd century A.D., and is approximately 3 inches high. This powerful piece is the terminal end for a leg that served as a table support for a folding tripod. These Roman bronze tripods were portable and moved with the Roman armies and/or wealthy families. This piece had a L-shaped hook at the back that supported a caldron that was at the center of the tripod. This piece is in the form of a portrait bust, and likely depicts the young Roman emperor Caracalla. This portrait bust also has an attribute relative to Herakles, as the figure is seen wearing a lion's skin cloak. The face has a short cropped beard, a rounded nose, and a wide forehead which are prominent features of Caracalla. The head is slightly turned to the right, as are many Roman marble portrait busts during this period. The hair is seen as thick rounded curls which may indicate a wig, as Caracalla was known to have worn a golden haired wig that was arranged in the German style. Caracalla was born in 188 A.D., and in 213 A.D. as emperor, he left Rome for Germany and defeated the Alamanni on the upper Rhine River. Caracalla often wore a flowing Gallic cloak which gave him his nickname, and the bust seen here shows a lion's skin cloak that is not only an attribute of Herakles, but is also an attribute of Alexander the Great. After Caracalla's victories in Germany, he planned an invasion of the Parthian east, and in 214 A.D., he mustered a great army for this oriental expedition, including a phalanx of sixteen thousand men, clothed and equipped like the Macedonians of old. Caracalla liked to see himself as a new Alexander the Great, and this may explain the lion's skin cloak seen on this piece. Caracalla met his end in 216 A.D., near Edessa in Media, and was stabbed to death by supporters of Macrinus. This piece is likely a portrait of Caracalla for the reasons noted above, and there is a strong possibility that this stylized image is an image of Caracalla as seen in the guise of Alexander the Great. (The portraiture of Alexander the Great is noteworthy for the wide range of styles that were employed to portray his unique physiognomy. The treatment of the hair, for example, can be long and wavy, while others emphasize the cowlick seen above the forehead which is known as the "anastole". This "anastole" can also be seen on the piece offered here, with the hair raising up as a curl from the center of the forehead. For several examples of this hair style see F. Antonovich, "Les Metamorphoses divines d'Alexander", Paris, 1996.) This portrait bust is also analogous to the marble bust of Caracalla that is seen in the Staatliche Museen in Berlin, Germany. (See "The Art of Rome" by Bernard Andreae, Abrams Pub., New York, 1977, no. 551.) This marble bust dates circa 212 A.D., and was created on the occasion of Caracalla becoming sole ruler. This marble bust also has large hair curls and bare arms/upper chest, as also seen in the bronze portrait bust offered here. This piece has a superb dark green patina with spotty dark red highlights, and sits on a custom display stand. Ex: New York private collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities New York, Dec. 2006, no. 122. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1295397
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This beautiful Greek coin is a silver drachm attributed to the mint and city of Larissa, and dates circa 400-380 B.C. This piece is approximately 20mm in diameter, weighs 6.15 g., and is in EF-/EF condition. This piece also has extremely high relief and the obverse features the beautiful facing head of the nymph Larissa; and the reverse shows a grazing horse standing right on a ground line, with Greek lettering below meaning "Larissa". There is also the minute lettering "AI" seen below the belly of the horse, and this represents the signature of the die artist. According to C. Lorber in "The Silver Facing Head Coins of Larissa", Early Classification, Type 3: "The artist 'AI' became the mint's chief engraver, displacing he who signed himself 'SIMO', and the present dies are among the finest in the entire series." The coin offered here is one of the earliest dies of the series, and the early dies of the series had the two artist signatures noted above. In addition, the flank of the standing horse has a brand that appears to be the Greek letter "X". This "X" brand is also one of the few known examples, and appears only on this particular reverse die. It is unknown as to the meaning of this brand, and as this coin was signed by the artist, there certainly has to be a meaning behind this symbol. The early series with the facing heads of the mint Larissa predating circa 380 B.C., are the most desirable among collectors, and have a high degree of art. The attractive facing head seen here is leaning to the left, as the right shoulder is raised, and the female image has flowing hair that appears to be moving with the wind. The artist was able to convey a great deal of movement on the obverse, and in contrast, a complete sense of calm is conveyed on the reverse with the standing and grazing horse. This coin type, along with the artist's signature, is also considered by many numismatists to be a masterpiece, not only within the series, but also for the period. An exceptional coin of great beauty which is now scarce on the market. C. Lorber, Early Classification, no. 20.2. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1990's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1385777
Apolonia Ancient Art
$425.00
This complete piece is a Roman bronze oil lamp cover in the form of a facing Medusa head, and dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and is approximately 1.5 inches in diameter, by .28 inches high in relief. This piece was cast as one solid piece, and has a concave back side and the front side has the facing head of Medusa with long flowing hair. The face is extremely rounded with no facial expression, and has a cloak tie seen below the chin. In addition, there is an indented hole at the top with a bar which served as an opening for a swivel attachment. This piece covered a hole in a bronze oil lamp, and moved up and down over the hole. This piece has a lovely dark green patina, and has very sharp detail, especially with the eyes that have raised hollow pupils that are very noticeable. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, and is a large example for the type. This piece also hangs on a custom display stand, can easily be removed, and also can be worn as a pendant. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1308509
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This rare piece is a Greco-Roman bronze bust of a bald grotesque figurine that dates to the late Hellenistic Period, circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 1 inch high, and is a superb example with a nice even dark green patina. This piece was likely a bottle stopper and/or may have fitted into a long-necked glass or bronze vessel. The bottom of the stem appears to have been broken, and this piece may have had a longer stem that could have extended down into the vessel. This piece may also have had gold or silver gilt, and may possibly have been a garment or hair pin. Regardless of what this piece could have been, it was certainly made to have been seen, and the bald head and deformed features of this "grotesque bust" is very noticeable. This interesting piece has ears that are lop-sided, with one higher than the other, deep sunken eyes, and a very a very large nose. This portrait may also represent an actual individual that was born with these deformities, and may have been created to represent an actual person rather than a fantasy individual. It is also possible that this deformed person may have been the subject of a play, and may have represented a type of actor. An analogous piece with a near identical portrait, and described as a "Dancing Grotesque of Mine", is seen in "Master Bronzes from the Classical World", by Mittien and Doeringer, Fogg Art Museum Pub., 1968, no. 122. (This published piece has an identical portrait as the piece offered here, and is bald except for a lock at the crown. This near nude figurine is also posed in a vigorous dance, and is a dancer that likely held castanet-like clappers. This piece is also described as having "contorted contours and exaggerated features which embody the Hellenistic love of caricature", and is "allegedly from Alexandria". See attached photo.) The portrait seen on this published piece, and the piece offered here is nearly identical, and both pieces were likely produced in an Alexandrian workshop. The rare piece offered here also sits on the custom display stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1323832
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This superb silver tetrobol (four obols) was minted in northern Greece in the fortress city of Olynthos. This beautiful "Classical Period" piece was minted circa 420-400 B.C., and is an early issue for the mint. This piece is superb quality, i.e. good extremely fine condition (EF+/EF+), is approximately 16 mm in diameter, weighs 2.6 gms, and has perfect centering with a light gray patina. The obverse has a bust of Apollo facing left, wearing a wreath, within a dotted border. There is also a Greek delta letter seen behind the bust, and this may indicate the mint master, or possibly be an artist's die signature. The reverse features a lyre, probably representing the lyre of Apollo, with Greek lettering around meaning (Chalkidike), all within an incuse square. Olynthos was the center of the Chalkidian League and issued a series of coins with beautiful heads of Apollo. This "Classical Period" coin shows the early head of Apollo for the series, which is known as the "severe style". This artistic style also best represents "Archaic Period" Greek sculpture. An exceptional high quality coin for this scarce early issue, and has perfect centering with a full dotted border which is not often seen. References: Sear 1425; Robinson-Clement, Group C, no. 24. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1321881
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This attractive ancient Greek coin is a Sikyon silver stater that dates circa 350-330 B.C. This coin is approximately 23 mm wide, weighs 11.8 gms, and is in good very fine/extremely fine condition (VF+/EF). This coin also has a light gray patina, perfect centering, and excellent metal, with some minute roughness seen mostly on the high relief sections of the obverse and reverse. This attractive coin features on the obverse the mythical creature Chimaera, facing left, with the letter "I" seen below the belly of the creature that is seen standing/walking on a ground line. The reverse features a dove flying left, with the letter "N" below the beak; all within a laurel wreath. The Chimaera was a celebrated monster who sprung from the union of Echidna and Typhon, and had three heads; those of a lion, a goat, and a dragon. The Greek hero Bellerophon with the support of Minerva, and the aid of the winged horse Pegasus, attacked and killed the Chimaera in an epic battle. The image of Chimaera, seen on the obverse of this coin, has a goat neck and head rising from it's back, and the head and body of a lion. The city of Sikyon chose this creature as a civic symbol, and is one of the few known images of this creature seen on ancient Greek coinage. This coin type is also highly desirable among collectors of ancient Greek coinage who collect coins that illustrate creatures known from ancient Greek myth. References: BMC 57. SNG Copenhagen 48. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, circa 1980's. I certify that this coin is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1356496
Apolonia Ancient Art
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These scarce nearly identical standing nude concubine gold earrings date circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. These erotic pieces are approximately 2.25 inches high, from the top of the hoop to the bottom of the figures, and are .3 inches wide at the shoulders. The figures themselves are approximately 1.5 inches high. These solid gold pieces together weigh 4.4 grams, and are not gold gilt over another metal which is sometimes the case relative to ancient jewelry. These attractive pieces are complete, and have no restoration/repair. These pieces are also very durably made, and are solid examples that can easily be worn today. Each of the figures are completely nude, and have some minute punched details such as dotted breast nipples, belly button circles, circular eyes, and minute linear hair. Each figurine also appears to be wearing an Egyptian type wig, and the standing body pose is classic Egyptian, with the arms straight down at the sides and the legs tightly together. The frontal design is slightly raised on both pieces, and the back of both earrings are mostly flat. Each figure is also made from two gold sheets that were folded over, and this doubling of the thin gold sheet gave these earrings some added strength. These earrings are highly erotic, and were likely worn to identify a woman who was a concubine for a wealthy and/or important person in antiquity. They also resemble the goddess Isis, and these pieces may have been worn in a religious capacity as well. The nude figurines also resemble a small carved ivory Egyptian concubine that is now seen in the Walters Art Museum. (This piece is approximately 2.5 inches high, and the back is flat as the gold earrings offered here. This piece was also purchased by Henry Walters in 1930. Inventory no.: 71.522. See attached photo.) The scarce to rare erotic gold earrings offered here can easily be worn today, as they also have thick gold hoops that are very solid. It's likely that these pieces were worn in antiquity, and may also have been a votive type object worn in the afterlife. A custom metal earring stand is included. Ex: D. Weller collection, Essen, Germany, circa 1930's-1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1366079
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This superb piece is a Greek Mycenaean bronze dagger that dates to the LH III Period, circa 1400-1190 B.C. This complete example is approximately 4.9 inches long, by 1.3 inches wide at the lower tang shoulder, and has no repair/restoration. In addition, this piece has a beautiful dark green patina with some minute and spotty dark brown mineral deposits. This piece is also classified as being the "Cruciform Type, Variant A", and has a flat blade without a midrib, slightly beveled edges, and an elliptical cross section. There is also a rounded lower tang shoulder, and the blade gradually moves down to a point. The design of the flat blade without a midrib, also allowed for an area on the blade that provided for the design of inlayed scenes that were made of precious materials such as gold and silver. Daggers such as the example offered here are scarce to rare, as most weapons with this design are much larger short swords. This piece also has two pin support holes, and one pin is still seen inserted into the piece. Many of these examples were also excavated at Mycenae, and the piece offered here was made during the height of Mycenaean expansion. A nice complete piece not often seen on the market. (For the type see "The Greek Age of Bronze", at www.salimbeti.com/micenei/weapons1.htm. A photo of a line drawing for the type from page 50 is attached.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1040039
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This mint quality piece is a large Greek pitcher that dates to the Greek Geometric Period, circa 8th-7th century B.C. This piece is approximately 10.75 inches high by 8.5 inches in diameter. This attractive piece is a light gray terracotta, and is intact with no noticeable chips and/or abrasions which are usually associated with ceramics of this type. This attractive piece also has nice light to dark brown earthen deposits and minute root marking. There is a single strap handle and trefoil mouth which allowed water and/or wine to be poured in a controlled manner. This piece also sits on a ring base that stabilizes this vessel a great deal, and together with the trefoil spout, are design innovations that represent a huge leap in ancient Greek ceramic design/production. This piece is scarce in this size and flawless condition, and is a very attractive early Greek light gray ceramic. Another analogous example nearly the same size is seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, London, July 1991, no.245. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1375752
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,365.00
This beautiful Greco-Roman Hellenistic gold pendant/brooch dates circa 1st century B.C.-2nd century A.D. This complete piece is approximately 1.35 inches wide, by 1.45 inches high, by .2 inches deep, and is a complete and intact example. This detailed piece has two rows of "cut-out" designs seen in the gold bezel, along with a solid inner circular bezel band that frames a dark orange/red agate. This large agate stone is also translucent, and changes color depending on the light. The backside of this piece has a frame that wraps and encloses the agate, and firmly holds it into place within the piece. There are also four round hoops evenly spaced and attached to this backside frame, and this allows this piece to be suspended several ways, and provides one with an option to add suspended pearls or other decorative elements. This may have the case in antiquity, and/or this piece may have been part of a larger necklace as well. This piece is very solid and can easily be worn today, and a hard case gift box is included. Ex: H. Konopisky collection, Freiburg, Germany, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Byzantine : Pre AD 1000 item #1363649
Apolonia Ancient Art
$375.00
This rare Byzantine bronze coin is a "double-follis" attributed to Basil II, circa 976-1025 A.D., and is likely Constantinople mint. This rare coin is approximately 35mm wide, weighs approximately 22.1 gms, and is in extremely fine/extremely fine (EF/EF) condition. This coin was minted at the height of the Byzantine Empire under Basil II, and is approximately twice the weight of a "single follis", as the average weight of a "single follis" is approximately 9.54-10.25 grams. This rare coin is a denomination seldom seen on the market, as it was produced with dies that were used for a "single follis", along with a flan that is simply twice the weight of a "single follis". This coin type is also classified as a "medallion", and Byzantine "medallions" were only minted on special occasions. The obverse (Obv.) features the bust of Christ Pantokrator with long hair, along with the image of a halo and cross behind, and within each limb of the cross, there are five dots. There are also two dots seen to the right of the bust, all within a dotted border. The reverse (Rev.) features three lines of lettering that also name Basil II. This superb Byzantine bronze also has a great deal of eye appeal, as it has a beautiful dark green patina with spotty red highlights. This piece is not only a nice example of a Byzantine bronze coin, but it is also a Christian artifact in this large size. References: Sear 1813 (follis); Berk 948 (follis). Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Pre AD 1000 item #1073003
Apolonia Ancient Art
Apolonia Ancient Art is a full member of the AIAD (Association of International Antiquities Dealers). Apolonia Ancient Art follows the "Code of Conduct", as defined by the AIAD regarding all business transactions. The AIAD is an association of dealers in antiquities (including fine art, coins, metallic and ceramic objects) whose aim is to promote responsible antiquities dealing and to provide a support network and means of exchanging relevant information about fakes, forgeries, fraudulent misrepresentation, and stolen goods with a view to identifying such items offered for sale and notifying the appropriate authorities. The AIAD members "Code of Conduct" can be found at: https://aiad.org.uk.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1398820
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This superb piece is an Egyptian alabaster cosmetic vessel that dates to the Late Dynastic Period, 26th-31st Dynasty, circa 664-332 B.C., and is approximately 2.5 inches high with the lid, by 2.4 inches in diameter at the base. This piece is a complete example, as it has the original lid that was made with the main body, and the side lug handles are original with no repair and/or restoration. This superb piece is also near mint "as found" condition, save for a minute chip on the underside edge of the lid and some roughness on the flat bottom. This roughness on the flat bottom also has some heavy calcite deposits and some spotty dark brown mineral deposits which is also an excellent indication of age. This carved banded alabaster vessel also has a nice light honey-brown patina, and has not been over cleaned as the majority of these vessels have. The patina on the main body of this vessel also matches sections of the lower lid. There is also some minute root marking seen on both the outer and inner surfaces of this esoteric vessel as well. This piece has a very attractive shape, and graduates in size from the lip of the main body down to the flat base. There are also bow drilled holes seen within each lug handle, as well as the raised handle at the top of the lid. This piece is scarce with it's original lid and condition, and is a superb vessel for the type. This type of alabaster vessel is also known as a "beehive" type vessel, and was likely made in Naukratis, Egypt by Greek artists for export. For the type see: "Naukratis: Greeks in Egypt, Stone Vessels" by Aurelia Masson, The British Museum Pub., Fig. 7. Ex: Private New York art market circa 1980's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #594619
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This Roman silver miniature eagle is extremely detailed, is a masterpiece of roman engraving, and dates circa 1st century B.C.- 1st century A.D. The quality and detail seen on this piece is mint to superb, and this piece probably was made by a gem engraver and/or coin die celator. This miniature silver piece is approximately 1.25 inches high, weighs approximately 11 gms, and sits on a custom clear/black plexiglas base. This piece rotates around on a small pin that is centered within a clear plexiglas post. This piece is also solid, as it was cast, then hand-worked with minute detail. This remarkable minute detail is especially seen within the wings and upturned head, and this type of workmanship reminds one of the Greek coins of Acragas, circa 472-420 B.C., that show a standing eagle in the process of devouring a captured hare. A coin such as this may have served as a model for the exceptional piece offered here, as the Roman artists strove to duplicate the earlier Greek artists. The minute detail, seen within the feathers of the wings and the tension portrayed in the neck with a slight twist, could only have been produced by a very accomplished artist. The pose of this piece is very refined from every angle, which is another point that defines this piece. The patina of this piece is aged to a light gray, which indicates that this piece has had contact with oxygen for quite some time and that it has not been recently cleaned. An exceptional piece with fine detail and one of the best Roman miniatures that has been offered. Ex: Private German collection. Ex: Private New York collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1356502
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This mint quality and extra large Greek Attic vessel is a "glaux type" skyphos that dates circa 475-450 B.C. In the Beazley Archive of vessel shapes, this type of vessel is also classified as a "Type B" skyphos. This large vessel is approximately 7.25 inches wide from handle to handle, and is 3.5 inches high. This piece is much larger than other examples of this type, and it has a larger field on each side of the vessel for the painted decorative elements that are seen on this attractive vessel. These decorative elements are two standing owls, which are each framed by two olive sprays, and are seen on each side of the vessel. Each of the standing owls are approximately 2.7 inches high, which is also the approximate height that this type of vessel is usually found. This piece also has a very distinctive design feature, which is that one handle is seen attached to the vessel in a vertical fashion, and the other in a horizontal fashion. This handle design also refers to the common name that this type of vessel is known as, and this vessel type is often referred to as a "glaux shyphos". This esoteric vessel also has a rim wall that curves gently inward towards the rim, a single black centering circle seen on the bottom of the footed base, and a row of dots that frames the face of each owl. Each owl also has short stubby legs, and straight lines that form the design of the wing that is facing the viewer. These design features are also found on the standing owls that are seen on the silver coinage of Athens that is contemporary with the vessel offered here. In addition, the composition seen on this piece is balanced on a ground line that circles the piece. The standing owl was also sacred to Athena, who was the patron goddess for the city of Athens. It may also be likely that the type of vessel offered here may have had a ceremonial and/or ritual purpose, and was offered as a votive type vessel. This may also explain why this vessel is in mint condition, with no cracks or chips, and is seen in it's pristine "as found" condition. This beautiful piece also has some spotty white calcite deposits, seen mostly in the low relief sections of the vessel, and a vibrant deep black glaze that highlights the design features that are rendered in a dark orange color. Another analogous vessel of this type, and of the more common smaller size, was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, 2016; Ex J.M.E. collection, Sotheby's London, May 1987. (See attached photo.) The piece offered here is an exceptional example seldom seen in this size and condition. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1054243
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This interesting Moche vessel is in the form of a skeletal head, and it dates circa 200-500 A.D. This piece is approximately 6 inches high, and is intact with no repair/restoration. This piece is mold made from a light brown terracotta, and there are spotty dark black and brown dotted deposits. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, as the eyes and mouth are framed with shrunken skin not unlike a death skull. There is some academics that think this type of Moche portraiture displays an ancestor from the underworld, or it may portray a sacrifical victim that is seen with his skin ceremoniously flayed back away from the face. Whatever the case may be, there are many Moche vessels that portray a skeletal figurine, and there is likely a spiritual and/or underworld connection to this genre of Moche art. This piece has a flat bottom and is also designed with an upward tilt, in order that the face looks upward at the viewer. This piece is truly a powerful Moche image, and may also represent a "transformation" piece that may be a bridge between the living and the underworld. Ex: Andrea Sarmiento collection, Miami, FL. Ex: Erika Roman estate, Santa Cruz, CA. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1373329
Apolonia Ancient Art
$725.00
This stylized piece is a Scythian bronze bridle plaque in the form of a recumbent stag that dates circa 5th century B.C. This piece is approximately 1.2 inches high, by 1.3 inches long, by .22 inches thick in the main body of the piece. This interesting piece is a stylized seated recumbent stag that is seen looking back, with his horns arcing up at the front. There is also an extended ear seen below the horns, an elongated neck, a snout touching the hind quarters, and a hole representing a facing eye. This hole likely held a precious stone, and sections of this piece has some worn gold gilt. The back of this piece also has a round attachment ring that allowed this decorative plaque to slide onto, and attach to, a leather strap that likely made up a horse bridle. There was another duplicate ring on the backside that is missing, and this piece is complete and intact save for this missing attachment ring. This piece also has an attractive dark green patina, and overall, this piece is a better example than what is usually seen on the market. (Another example can be seen in "From the Lands of the Scythians" Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1975, no. 50. See attached photo.) This piece can also be easily worn today, and comes with a custom display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1990's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1246443
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This esoteric piece is a Roman bronze herm that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D. This piece is approximately 3 inches high, and has a beautiful dark green patina with some spotty dark red highlights. This piece is also complete, and has no restoration/repair. This piece has the typical Roman herm design, which is a square designed lower body, small square side handles that are seen just below the shoulders, and an attached bust seen at the top. The design of this attractive bronze is an imitation of a large marble or bronze sculpture, which was normally erected in front of private homes as a "protector type" object. The piece offered here was likely part of a private shrine that was inside of a private home or temple. What makes the design of this piece not so typical, is the realistic and young satyr head which has a young, sweet appearance. The head is very detailed and is seen slightly tilted to the right, and the thin neck, detailed hair, and upturned horns seen on the upper forehead is very esoteric. An analogous type/example is seen in Bonham's Antiquities, London, June 1997, no. 298. (800-1000 Pound estimates. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is a scarce example, as it has great artistic style and eye appeal. This piece stands on a custom display stand, and can be easily removed. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional information is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1381605
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865.00
This piece is a Chancay canteen type vessel that dates circa 1100-1400 A.D. This piece is approximately 11.8 inches high, by 9 inches wide, by 4.5 inches thick through the main body of the vessel. This piece is a scarce "black-on-red" Chancay canteen vessel, as the majority of Chancay vessels are "black-on-cream" type vessels, and tend to be rather thin walled. The piece offered here is very durable, as it has thick walls, although it was a mold-made type vessel. This piece has attractive black geometric patterns seen on a red background on both sides of the vessel, and a raised rounded spout at the top, that also has the face and head of a god built into the spout. The face of the god appears to have tattoos, and has a very prominent nose. The handles of the vessel also double as arms, and there appears to be black painted hands seen at the top of each handle where it meets the spout. The god seen here may depict a Chancay "water-god", as this culture existed in a very arid region in ancient Peru. This intact piece is also in superb condition, with no repair and/or restoration, and has vibrant colors. This piece also sits on a custom Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note this piece has additional documentation for the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1378231
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This piece is an Egyptian wooden mummy mask that dates to the Late Period, circa 700-30 B.C. This wooden piece is approximately 8.3 inches high, by 5.3 inches wide, and is a solid example. This pleasing "two-part" piece has a nose attached to the main body of the piece with two wooden dowels, and there are six additional dowels that attached the mask to the coffin lid. Five of these dowels are still in place, and in addition, there is a single dowel seen below the chin that was used to attach the mask to an extended wooden beard. The eyes and eye brows were created with angular cuts, in addition to the upper wig. The face also was applied with a thick white gesso, and thick amounts of it can be seen in various sections of the face. This esoteric face also has a slight smile, and has a great deal of eye appeal. The backside of the mask is flat, as it was attached to the coffin lid. This piece is a superb example with it's sectional dowel construction, and likely was made for a young man. This attractive piece also comes with a custom display stand. Ex: Collection of Swanhild Castle, Brooklyn, New York, circa 1960's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1313512
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This appealing piece is a Greek Hellenistic period bronze torso of a striding Herakles, and dates circa 3rd-1st century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.1 inches high, and is mounted on a custom display stand. This piece shows a striding nude Herakles who is seen wearing his lion's skin cloak draped over his left shoulder and arm, and this cloak is attached by a round fibula seen on his right shoulder. This lion's skin cloak is also designed with a stippled dotted design, which denotes this garment as being made from an animal skin. This torso has an intact left arm, and this Herakles figurine appears to be holding a round patera or possibly a vessel of some sort. This figurine also has both muscular legs, with the right leg seen striding forward, and the movement of this powerfully muscular body is easily seen. The torso is very well defined, and displays a very high degree of art, and is much better than most figurines of this type. This attractive piece also has an exceptional dark green/blue patina, and is evenly seen around the entire piece. This piece is an exceptional Greek bronze torso with an equally exceptional patina, and is scarce on today's market in this condition. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1323957
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This superb to extremely fine coin is a Greek silver drachm attributed to Philip III, and was minted shortly after the death of Alexander the Great, circa 323 B.C. This coin was minted circa 323-319 B.C., is in superb to extremely fine condition (EF+/EF), is approximately 17 mm in diameter, weighs 4.2 gms, has nice centering, and a light gray patina. The obverse shows Herakles wearing a lion's skin headdress facing right, all within a dotted border. The reverse shows a seated Zeus, holding a standing eagle to the front, with a Greek monogram seen at the front and the name (Philip) in Greek lettering seen behind, all within a dotted border. This coin was minted in the name of Philip III Arridaeus, half brother of Alexander the Great, who was slated to share power with Alexander IV, the infant son of the late king Alexander the Great. The real power still lay behind the generals - Perdikkas, Antigonos, Lysimachos, Seleukos, Ptolomy and others - who were all biding their time for power. The coin offered here was likely minted by Antigonos, who had control of the bulk of Alexander's Asian posessions shortly after his death. This coin is also attributed to the mint of "Magnesia ad Maeandrum", and "minted circa 323-319 B.C." by Martin Price, who also noted that this mint was also controlled by Antigonos at the time this coin was minted. A nice coin with historical merit, and a nice quality example. References: Sear no. 6750; Price no. P56a. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1372973
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865.00
This dainty and superb piece is a Greek Attic lekythos that dates circa 5th-4th century B.C. This "Black-Figure" Greek Attic piece is approximately 5.6 inches high, by 2 inches in diameter. This attractive little piece has three palmette pattern designs seen at the front side, and the back side has a single strap handle attached to the extended neck and the upper shoulder of the vessel. A black band is seen on the outer edge of the upper lip, and also above the "disk-shaped" base. There is a linear "ray-pattern" seen on the upper shoulder, and all of the design elements seen on this attractive vessel lend this piece a great deal of eye appeal. This piece is intact, with no repair/restoration, and is in near mint condition, save for some minor and minute scuff marks seen on the back side of the vessel. This piece also has some spotty white calcite deposits seen mostly on the bottom of the base disk. A nice "Black-Figure" Greek Attic piece that is better than most examples. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #956245
Apolonia Ancient Art
$625.00
These three pieces are being offered as one lot, as they are made from the same light red/tan clay fabric, and have similar light tan earthern deposits that have minute root marking. These three intact pieces are all classified as being Greek Corinthian, and date circa mid 6th century B.C. The first piece is an aryballos, that is approximately 2.25 inches high. This petite piece has some dark brown design elements that are seen at the rounded base, and is in superb condition, save for some unobtrusive chips that are seen below the lip. The second piece is a thin walled skyphos, that is approximately 3.1 inches high by 6 inches wide handle to handle. This piece is also in superb condition, save for a minute chip at the base that may be from antiquity. The third piece is a exaleiptron, otherwise known as a "kothon", which was used as a funerary ritual vessel that contained aromatic oil. This piece is also in superb condition, save for a minute chip at the end of one of the two handle flares. This vessel has a low foot ring and has traces of geometric light brown painted line design under the earthern deposits. All three of the superb vessels offered here may have been used in a votive funerary ritual as well. All three of these pieces are in an intact "as found" condition, although they have little or no glaze with heavy tan earthen deposits. Corinthian vessels, such as the three examples offered here, were also exported throughout the ancient Greek world during the 6th century B.C., and competed for markets with ancient Greek Attic ceramics. An interesting group that is being offered as one lot. Ex: Arte Primitivo, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 2000's. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1360586
Apolonia Ancient Art
$685.00
These three Egypto-Late Roman "millefiori" glass beads date circa 7th-8th century A.D., and are in mint quality condition. These three brilliant colored glass beads are approximately .75, .5, and .7 inches high, and .7 inches in diameter. These pieces are classified as being Egypto-Roman "millefiori" glass, and all three beads have vibrant multiple colors such as white, light blue, dark red, green, dark blue, yellow, and black. These three beads are also very different with their color combinations and their surface texture. "Millefiori" glass was highly specialized in it's production, and was made with multi-colored glass canes or rods. In antiquity, these beads were also prized as personal jewelry and works of art. These beads are also thought to have been produced in Egypt in the city of Fustat, and are also commonly known as "crumb-beads". These beautiful pieces are also very durable, and can easily be worn today. A necklace with 32 analogous Roman "millefiori" beads was sold at Christie's Ancient Jewelry, Dec. 2007, no. 426. ($15,000.00-$20,000.00 estimates, $27,400.00 realized. See attached photo.) The three Egypto-Roman beads offered here not only have very vibrant colors, but also have a high degree of eye appeal and are three of the finest examples offered on the market today. These three pieces also sit on a custom display stand, and can easily lift off their support pins. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #943121
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This piece is an exceptionally large carved marble seal that is approximately 2 inches in diameter by .75 inches high. This piece dates circa 4th Millennium B.C., and is flat on one side with an oval shape on the other. The flat side displays a running ibex that is seen facing right, and there is a crescent moon and a single dot solar symbol that is is seen above. There is also a bow drilled hole that is seen running through the center, and this piece was probably attached to a cord that was worn over the neck of the individual that owned this piece. This piece likely served as an individual seal for the owner, and may have been used as a mark of value. The design was also bow drilled, as there are individual bow-drilled circles that constitute the overall design that is seen on the flat face of this scarce piece. This piece is analogous to an example seen in Bonhams Antiquities, London, May 2008, no. 348. This type of design is also analogous to several cultures that were found in the ancient Near East during this early period, and this type of design is often seen in Anatolia/North Syria, and is often found on hardstone seals made from black steatite. The marble that this piece is made from, was likely imported into the region, and it is a scarce material for a seal this large. This piece has a nice light grey patina and there are spotty white and light brown calcite deposits. There are also some concentrated straight marks on the oval side, and this piece may also have served as a wet stone for a blade during a later period in antiquity. A nice rare seal not often seen on the market. Ex: Erlenmeyer Collection, Basel, Switzerland. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, London, June 1997, no. 1. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1316847
Apolonia Ancient Art
$725.00
This attractive piece is a Roman gold ring that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately ring size 3.25, and has a 9/16 inch inner diameter. This piece is complete, and has an attractive blue-green glass inlay set within the raised bezel. There are also some spotty dark to light gray mineral deposits seen on the outer surface of the glass, along with some thick dark brown deposits. The glass inlay is a glass paste that was hardened within the bezel in antiquity. This complete piece was made for a young adult, likely a child, and is a solid gold piece. This piece can easily be worn today, as the glass inlay is very solid, along with the gold hoop and bezel. A piece with nice eye appeal that is also in it's natural "as found" condition. A ring box is also included. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as o date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1356584
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This interesting piece is a Celtic bronze ring, otherwise known as a "terret ring", and dates circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 2.25 inches high, by 2.5 inches wide, and is a complete example. This piece was reportedly found in the southern coastal region of the United Kingdom, and was mounted on a war chariot that served as a guide for the horse reins. The reins would pass through the ring and gave the charioteer greater control over the horses. The design of this piece, with a raised center and oval shape, also allowed for better separation of the two sets of reins that connected to the two horses that pulled a Celtic war chariot. This piece also has an attachment loop at the base which was mounted down into a wooden rail, and was held in place by a pin. This esoteric piece was also made when Caius Julius Caesar invaded Britain, circa 55 B.C., and the war chariot was relatively new to the Romans as a weapon of war. The war chariot, with one charioteer and one warrior with a shield and spear, gave the Romans all they could handle at the time of the invasion. The Romans faced two-wheeled and four-wheeled chariots which carried warriors into the attack. The war chariot was introduced to Britain in the 3rd century B.C. by the Parisi of Yorkshire, the Gallic tribe whose capital still bears their name (Paris). The Celtic chariots were made of light wooded frames and were elaborately fitted with bronze fittings and wheels with iron rims. The war chariot is featured in many of the sagas of Celtic mythology, and the piece offered here is an excellent representation of the native Celts of Britain. This complete piece has a graceful shape, has no repair/restoration, and has a beautiful dark green patina. There is also some spotty mineral deposits seen mostly on the underside of the piece. Another analogous piece of the same size and type was offered in Bonham's Antiquities, London, Dec. 1995, no. 339. (2500-3500 pounds estimates. See attached photo.) For the type see: E.T. Leeds "Celtic Ornament in the British Isles", Oxford, 1933, pp. 118-126. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private English collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1384532
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This powerful piece is an early Moche seated dignitary that dates circa 300-100 B.C., and is approximately 7.2 inches high. This piece is intact with no repair/restoration, and has a light brown and dark red glaze. This powerful looking piece is a seated dignitary seen with hands placed on the knees with feet crossed below, wearing an incised cap, and has a furrowed face with large eyes and a grinning mouth. The eyes and mouth have a deep recessed design that was likely once inlaid with mother of pearl or shell, and the face conveys a sacred, but powerful image. The back side of this vessel has a raised stirrup handle that has a dark red glaze, along with the back side of the head. This piece also has a flat bottom, and some spotty dark black mineral deposits and attractive dark brown burnishing. (Another analogous example of this piece was offered in Lempertz Pre-Columbian Art, Jan. 2010, Brussels, no. 104. 4500-6500 Euro estimates.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Coins : Pre AD 1000 item #1150976
Apolonia Ancient Art
$265.00
This is a group of three (3) late Roman bronze coins that were minted by the emperor Gratian. These coins were minted circa 367-383 A.D., and are all AE 3 (17 mm) and grade EF to Superb. Coins A,B. and C (left to right) all show the pearl-diademed and draped bust of Gratian facing right on the obverse. The reverse shows - Coin A: Gratian advancing right, dragging captive and holding labarum, GLORIARO-MANORVM left and right, H right field. (Sear no. 4142.) Coin B: Victory advancing left, SECVRITAS-REIPVBLICAE left and right. (Sear no. 4143.) Coin C: Gratian advancing right, dragging captive and holding labarum, GLORIARO-MANORVM left and right, H left field, Star and P right field (Sear no. 4142.) All three of these detailed coins are slightly different with different symbols, and are all minted in the Siscia mint (Sisak, former Yugoslavia), as indicated by the SIS as seen below the ground line on the reverse of all three coins. All three coins have a beautiful glossy dark green patina, and have exceptional line designed detail. (A coin with a EF grade, Gratian dragging a captive reverse type, sold in Gorny & Mosch, March 2012, for $106.00.) Ex: Harlan J. Berk, circa 1980's. I certify that these coins are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre 1492 item #1268018
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This beautiful and vibrant piece is a Greek Apulian lidded mug that dates circa 310 B.C. This piece has been attributed to the Kantharos Group, and is approximately 8.25 inches high with the lid. This beautiful piece is also known as a kothon, and this type of vessel normally has a knobbed lid and extended neck, as seen with the piece offered here. This piece is mint quality, with no repair/restoration, and has very vibrant white, yellow, red, and black colors. This piece has a rounded knobbed handle seen at the top center of the lid, and there are two female heads seen on the top of the lid, along with a detailed acanthus pattern between. There is also a large female head seen on the main body of the vessel facing left, along with the top section of a white and red wing that is seen curling up at the front of her face. The female head is also seen wearing a detailed sakkos in her hair that is highlighted with dotted and cross patterns, and is also wearing an elaborate earring and dotted necklace. This figure likely represents a winged "Eros", and this portrait type is also known as a "lady of fashion", and is thought by many academics to also represent Demeter and/or Persephone. To the ancient Greeks the fertility of the ground was closely associated with the autumnal sowing. The return of life and burial is symbolized in the myth of Persephone's abduction and return, and gave rise to the ritual of the Eleusinian Mysteries, in which the worshippers believed that the restoration of the goddess to the upper world promised the faithful their own resurrection from death. This lidded vessel probably held a burial offering such as grain, or a product that could have been used by the deceased in the afterlife. This attractive vessel also has highly decorative floral patterns that are seen on each side of the lady's portrait, and a single "Herakles-knot" type designed handle. This piece is better than most examples of it's type, and another analogous example of this type of vessel of nearly the same size and condition was offered in Christie's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2011, no. 138. ($3,000.00-$5000.00 estimates, $5,250.00 realized. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is among one of the best examples offered on the market, and is scarce in this mint condition. Ex: G. van Driesum collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Michael Waltz collection, Germany, circa 1970's-1980's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1290668
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This attractive coin is a Greek EL (electron) hekte that was minted in Kyzikos, circa 550-500 B.C. This scarce piece shows the winged helmeted head of Perseus on the obverse, with a tunny fish behind; and the reverse is a quadripartite incuse square punch. This piece is superb quality (EF+/EF+), is approximately 12mm, 2.69gms, is well centered for the type, and has a lustrous high relief sharp portrait of the mythical figure Perseus. The portrait is also seen in the "Greek Archaic" artistic style, and is seen with a large almond eye, a large nose and chin, and a slight smile. "Greek Archaic" portraiture is also a very desirable feature highly valued by collectors of ancient Greek coins, and the portrait seen here is a fine example. There is also an unobtrusive test mark behind the bust, and is very difficult to see, and does not detract from the detailed and high relief portrait of Perseus. Kyzikos was located on the southwest shore of the Propontis in ancient Mysia next to the river Aisepos. The city's prosperity was due principally to its two fine harbors, which made it a convenient stopping point for merchant ships trading between the Aegean and Black Seas, and the coin seen here likely was made to facilitate port and shipping fees. Kyzikos principle export was the tunny fish, which is often seen on the obverse of it's coinage. The prevalence of winged beings seen on Kyzikene coinage is a reflection of an archaic mythical convention of art, that assigned wings to most divine or sacred entities as a symbol of their nature, and in the case of the gods, of their power to move across great distances. On the coin offered here, we see Perseus, who was the son of Zeus and the mortal Danae, who was the daughter of the king of Argos; and as Perseus had divine status, he was widely worshiped and admired among the ancient Greeks. On the exceptional coin offered here, he is depicted as a divine entity wearing a winged helmet, which is the so-called "Helm of Hades", which rendered its owner invisible to other supernatural entities and mortals. This winged helmet was given to him by Athena, in order to help him evade the gorgons Sthenno and Euryale after he had slain and decapitated their sister Medusa. The coin offered here is scarce to rare on the market, and is a rare depiction of Perseus. Von Fritze no. 65. SNG von Aulock no. 1186. Ex: Harlan Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1329657
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This Greek gold pendant dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 4th-3rd century B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 1 inch high, by .65 inches wide, by .26 inches thick, and weighs 3.9 gms. This piece was made of solid sheet gold, and was hammered and folded over molds which formed a pendant that has three tubular compartments. Each of these three compartments contained a blue/purple glass paste inlay that extended past each of the open ends of each tubular compartment. The ancient Greeks, and especially the ancient Egyptians, incorporated the color "blue" into talisman pendants and rings in order to ward off evil and bring good luck. The pendant offered here may have been a talisman pendant of this type, as this piece has an attractive blue/purple glass paste inlay. The top and bottom compartments still retain the original glass paste inlay, while the middle compartment has this missing. There is also a raised decorative cable border seen at each tubular end, and this cable border added extra strength to the open ends of each compartment. There is also an applied hoop seen at one end, and this pendant was likely suspended from a gold chain, and may also have been an element in a large necklace. This piece is complete, save for the missing glass paste inlay in the middle tubular section, and the remaining glass paste inlay is very solid. There are some minute dents and stress cracks which are not very noticeable, and overall, this piece is a solid example that can easily be worn today. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1299213
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This scarce Greek Attic "Black-Figure" kylix dates circa late 6th century-early 5th century B.C., and is approximately 9.75 inches wide from handle to handle, by 2.7 inches high. This piece is in superb condition, and is intact with no noticeable repair/restoration. This piece is a "Type B" form, and has a wide and shallow draft for the inner bowl, two attached rounded and looping handles, and a slightly raised disk seen above the thick base disk. (For the "Type B" form, and the authoritative work on Attic Black-Figure painters, see J.D. Beazley, "Attic Black-Figure Vase Painters", Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1956.) There is also a solid black inner glaze, along with a dotted tondo seen within a tan reserve. The outer surface of this fine cup has two attractive large black palmettes, seen on each side, which alternate between three black floral patterns. There is also a solid lustrous black glaze seen below the palmettes, and this continues to the top of the base disk. Another analogous example of identical size and design was offered in Bonhams Antiquities, London, Oct. 1996, no. 14. (250-280 Pound estimates, 450 Pounds realized, approximately $910.00 US. See attached photo.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Metalwork : Pre AD 1000 item #840348
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This rare piece is a solid cast bronze that is in the form of a standing goat. This piece is probably Sassanian, dates circa 250-640 A.D., and was produced in the ancient Near East. This piece is approximately 3 inches high by 4 inches long, and has a nice dark green patina. The surfaces of this piece have spotty light white and green calcite deposits, minute wear on the bottom of the feet, and minute scratches which all indicate great age. This piece also has pegs that extend outwards from the feet, and these pegs may have supported wheels which made this piece well served as a toy, but more likely, the pegs were fitted into a flat bronze base or into a wooden fitting. This piece may also have been a votive offering and/or served as a chariot fitting. The goat also appears to have a slight smile which gives this piece a lively expression. This piece is analogous in artistic design and size to another bronze figurine, of a standing Ibex, that is seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, May 1986, no. 99. ($2,000.00-$3,000.00 estimates.) The piece offered here is a rare pre-Islamic bronze piece that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1215119
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This piece is a Mayan terracotta that dates from the Late Classic period, circa 600-900 A.D., and is approximately 6 inches high by 7.5 inches wide by 4.5 inches deep. This piece has powerful eye appeal, as it shows the Mexican rain god Tlaloc with large round eyes, scrolled upper lip, and exposed tooth row. This complete piece is a very large applique that was part of a extremely large vessel which may have had several of these applied appliques that ran around the outside of the vessel. There is original white pigment seen over the exposed teeth and round eyes, root marking seen in sections of the piece, and there are light brown and gray earthen deposits seen over the entire piece. The condition of this piece is intact, with little apparent crack fill, and this piece appears to have broken cleanly away from the main body of the vessel. A wall section of this large vessel also forms the backside of the piece offered here. The mix of Mexican and Mayan motifs in the Late Classic period is not uncommon, and another example of a Mayan terracotta with the Mexican rain god Tlaloc can be seen in "Pre-Columbian Art: The Morton D. May and The Saint Louis Art Museum Collections" by Lee Parsons, New York, 1980, no. 318, p. 205. The Mexican rain god Tlaloc has also appeared since the Early Classic period in the Maya zone, and is often related to scenes of "autosacrifice" involving the nobility, in which they self extract and offer their own blood. This "blood letting ceremony", as an offering to the gods, is also a metaphor for rain, although the Maya had their own rain deity, Chaac. The piece offered here may also have been part of a large ceremonial blood letting vessel. In relation to the letting of blood, the Tlaloc deity also appears on war shields, as seen on Mayan terracotta figures. This piece is scarce to rare, and sits on a custom black metal stand. Ex: E. Duncan collection, Stilwell, Kansas, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1170376
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This superb little piece is a Greek Attic stemless kylix ceramic that dates circa 480-470 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.25 inches wide from handle to handle, and is approximately 2.1 inches high. This piece is also intact, is in mint quality condition, and has a multi-colored patina over an even deep black glaze. This multi-colored patina also compares with the finest examples that are normally seen for an Attic black glazed vessel of this type. This nice Greek Attic ceramic also has a nice brilliant deep black glaze on the inside of the bowl. There is an inconspicuous area, centered just below where one of the handles is attached to the main body of the vessel, and this is where an incised double "lambda" Greek letter symbol is seen. The ancient Greek "lambda" letter subsequently developed into letters in other alphabets including the Latin "L". These small letters and/or symbols are approximately .18 and.2 inches high, and may have been added to this piece to denote the owner, and/or perhaps how this piece was used in trade. In addition, these marks could have been used as a price notation and/or as a mark to denote a master vase of a group production. According to John Boardman in "The History of Greek Vases", Thames and Hudson Pub., London 2001, p. 154: "It seems to have been in the potter's yard that marks were made on the pots to identify their eventual carrier." In addition, Boardman states: "Most of these merchant marks are seen on vases of around 570 to 450 B.C., the period of busiest Athenian export..". A.W. Johnson in "Trademarks on Greek Vases", Aris & Philips Ltd., Wiltshire, U.K., 1979, pp. 5-6, states that: "A number of the marks are relatively inconspicuous, including those on the handle and some on the shoulder in the vicinity of the handle.....and there can be little doubt that these are trademarks." Types 2F and 6F, seen in the above reference, is also a close match seen on the vessel offered here. According to Johnson on pp. 4-7, Johnson states that the overall number of incised marks seen on these vessels is paltry, compared to those vessels with marks that are seen under foot. He also adds that these incised marks may also represent "batch" production marks, and that one vessel was marked to indicate the entire group of vessels that were possibly produced for export. It is also interesting to note that one of the "lambda" letters/symbols is slightly smaller than the other letter/symbol, and may represent a tally mark for a "batch" of vessels. This interesting piece also has an offset lip, as seen with the line that runs around the bowl, and is classified as being part of the Attic "Inset Lip Class, circa 480-470 B.C.". For the discussion of the type as a whole see: "The Athenian Agora, Vol. 12", by B. Sparkes and L. Talcott, Princeton University, 1970. This exceptional piece has some minute white calcite deposits, seen mostly on the bottom of the vessel, and a light red band seen above and below the bottom base ring. This interesting piece is scarce to rare, especially in this intact condition, and is a superb example with rare trade symbols that are not often seen on vessels of this type. Ex: Private Swiss collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1372929
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,375.00
This attractive Greek Apulian squat lekythos dates circa mid 4th century B.C., and is approximately 5.8 inches high. This piece has vibrant black, white, and dark orange colors, and features a draped woman moving to the right and looking back over her right shoulder. She is also seen holding a decorative plate in her extended right hand, and a wreath in her left hand. There is also a circle seen in the field below her right hand holding the decorative plate, and this may be a workshop control mark. This piece has a single handle attached to the main body of the vessel and the extended neck. There is also a decorative dark orange palmate pattern seen below the handle. The top of the vessel has a flat rim, and this was an aid in the flow of a valuable oily unguent, and enabled the owner of the vessel to apply small amounts of liquid from the rim. Another analogous piece of this type was offered by Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, June 2008, no. 87 ($600.00-$900.00 estimates, $3,438.00 realized.) The piece offered here is intact, save for some minor stress cracks seen in the extended neck, and overall, is a superb example with vibrant colors. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #1357998
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This attractive and flawless Roman glass vessel is a brilliant green colored jar that dates circa 3rd-4th century A.D., and is approximately 3.7 inches high, by 3.2 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is in mint condition, with no minute cracks and/or chips. The color is very attractive, and has a brilliant light green patina over a dark green glass. The patina also has a bright multi-colored iridescence that is seen on the inside and outside surfaces of the vessel. This piece also has four dark blue-green applied handles that attach to the vessel at three points, and this design also makes these handles very durable, along with the main body of the vessel. This piece has a raised stem base, and a flared collar-like neck that extends upwards away from the rounded body. The overall design of this beautiful vessel also made this vessel very easy to handle and grasp. Another analogous vessel of this type was offered in Christie's Antiquities, "Ancient Glass", London, 1985, no. 34. (2,000.00-3,000.00 Pounds estimates, 2,808 Pounds realized. See attached photo.) For the type see John Hayes, "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum", Toronto, 1975, no. 444. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1268923
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This scarce and mint quality piece is a Greek Xenon culture plate that dates circa 350-325 B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 9 inches in diameter, by 2.4 inches high. This piece has a multi-iridescent deep black glaze, dark red/orange, and white colors. This piece is also mint quality with no repair/restoration, has some spotty white calcite deposits, minute root marking, and has a great deal of eye appeal. This piece is a footed plate that has a raised ring foot, and a deep bowl. The inner center of this beautiful piece has a silhouette of a young woman's bust that is facing left, and there is a floral element seen below. There is an ivy-leaf pattern seen running around the central bust, along with decorative "cross pattern" and "line/dotted pattern" bands that are seen running around the outer section of the overall painted design. The female bust likely represents Demeter and/or Persephone, and represents the change of the seasons, and/or the renewal of life which this represents. The female goddess is also seen wearing a sakkos with a hair tie, and the profile of her face shows a high degree of art, as this profile conveys an eternally young woman. This piece also has two holes in the ring base which allowed this piece to be hung in a private home or shrine, and this piece may also have been a votive piece that was placed in the tomb. The artistic style of this piece is analogous to the Xenon type culture pieces that also have a central subject that was depicted in silhouette form. These Greek Xenon culture pieces usually depict a standing swan or a running dog or hare, and most have an ivy leaf pattern, with a design rendered in a red/orange color over a deep black glaze as the piece offered here. There are very few Xenon examples that have the woman's bust of a goddess, and most Xenon vessels are designed as a kylix or a small kantharos cup. The Greek Xenon culture is native to southern Italy, and their culture was derived from mainland Greece. This piece also comes with a Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Private German collection circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1365793
Apolonia Ancient Art
$8,675.00
This extremely rare piece is a Mycenaean/Minoan bronze goddess figurine that dates to the LH III Period, circa 1400-1100 B.C. This piece is approximately 4.4 inches high, by 1.25 inches wide at the fluted base, and is one of the largest recorded examples. This attractive figurine has a tubular shape, and was cast as one piece. The esoteric raised arms are also tapered and arc slightly, and in addition, they are curled at the end which forms the stylized hands. The body is also hollow, and there is an opening seen at the top of the body where the neck/head was attached. This neck/head likely was made from wood, or some other perishable material, and was attached into the main body with a dowel. There is also some incised lines seen just below the raised arms at the shoulder area, and this decorative "linear line design" is also seen on many examples of early Greek art from the Late Bronze Age, circa 1300 B.C., down to the Geometric Period, circa 750 B.C. These extremely rare figures may have been a grave offering, and/or could have been an offering that depicted significant rituals that were associated with rites of passage that involved the dead. The figurine offered here could also been part of a group of several figurines of this type, that together, composed a group scene that depicted a ritual as noted above. This theory was developed by Daniela Lefevre-Novaro, and her theory was supported by the figural terracotta models that were found in the Minoan Kamilari burial complex in Kamilari, Crete. These figural models can now be seen in the Herakleion Archaeological Museum, and date circa LM 1A, 1600-1500 B.C. (See "Coming of Age in Ancient Greece", by Jenifer Neils and John Oakley, Yale University Press, 2003, pp. 40-43.) The arms of the figurine offered here are also seen extended into the air, and this is an ancient Greek sign of "blessing" and "mourning" death, especially for children, and this posture is also depicted on art from the Greek Late Bronze Age, circa 13th century B.C. (For two examples that depict images of individuals with raised arms in mourning, see the two "larnakes" from Tanagra, Greece, which are in the Thebes Archaeological Museum, and date circa LH IIIB, 1300-1200 B.C. See two attached photos of these "larnakes" which are terracotta chests that were used as coffins.) The raised arms may also depict and/or represent bull's horns, which was connected to the Minoan culture, and this figurine may have served in this capacity as well, but the exact symbolic representation of these early Mycenaean/Minoan figurines is unknown. What is known, is that the majority of these votive pieces were made from terracotta, rather than bronze, and this is another reason why these exceptional bronze figurines are extremely rare. There have also been numerous terracotta figurines with uplifted arms found in Cyprus dated from the 11th century B.C., down to the 5th century B.C. This type of goddess figurine is also thought to have originated in Crete, and has been identified as being a "mother goddess" connected to fertility. (See "Ancient Cyprus" by Vassos Karageorghis, 1981, p. 125.) In summary, the piece offered here is likely a goddess figurine that represented several of the aspects noted above, and was either a votive grave offering, or an offering in a shrine. This esoteric bronze goddess figurine is intact, has no repair/restoration, and easily stands upright by itself. This piece also has a beautiful light to dark green patina with dark blue highlights, some minute root marking, and some spotty dark brown mineral deposits. This piece also sits on a custom stand and can easily be lifted off. The piece offered here is also extremely large for the type, and is one of the finest recorded examples. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1385356
Apolonia Ancient Art
$975.00
This mint quality piece is a Greek "Xenon ware" kantharos, and dates circa 375-350 B.C., and is approximately 4.25 inches high, by 6.25 inches wide from handle to handle. This Greek ceramic is classified as "Xenon ware", and was named after a similar kantharos that is now in Frankfurt, Germany that bears the inscription "XENON". This type of pottery represents a further aspect of Greek Apulian pottery from southern Italy that also has Greek mainland attributes. This attractive piece has a beautiful deep black glaze, a ring base, looped handles, and a dark orange painted box on each side that features various ivy tendrils and wave designs. There is also some nice minute spotty white calcite deposits and root marking seen on this mint quality vessel that has no repair and/or restoration. This vessel is scarce in this condition, and is a better example that what is usually seen on the market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1370580
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This scarce Chavin ceramic is a gray-ware bottle that dates to the Middle Chavin Period, circa 1000-700 B.C., and is approximately 8 inches high by 4.8 inches in diameter. This piece is also among the earliest ceramics that were produced by any Andean culture. This exceptional piece also has a finely polished and raised design on each side of the vessel which is a mirror image of one another, and this design is likely a stylized avian such as the raptorial "harpy eagle". One can see the stylized oval incised eye at the bottom of the design, and the two rising "four banded" sectional wings and/or head tufts that rise above into the central body of the vessel. The balance of the main body of the vessel is covered with incised "surface punctations" that were produced by rolling a shell mold over the wet clay. This provided a background for the main design and further enhances the design for the viewer. The graceful raised neck of this interesting piece is also glazed, as well as the flat bottom of the vessel. The raised and incised finely polished design of the stylized raptor, also has design elements that are analogous to some of the elements seen on the so-called "Tello Obelisk", seen at Chavin de Huantar, Peru. There are also theories that the supernatural avian, seen on the piece offered here, was an attendant and/or messenger of a celestial deity, rather than dieties themselves. (See "Chavin and the Origins of Andean Civilization", by Richard Burger, Thames and Hudson, 1995.) The superb piece offered here is also intact, with no apparent repair/restoration, and is an excellent representation for the type. This piece also has some minute root marking, and some minute spotty black mineral deposits. There are also two minute holes for the TL authenticity samples taken from the inside of the upper lip, and the other is on the flat base of the vessel. Ex: Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1970's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL authenticity test from Kotalla Lab, Germany, No. 38R270317, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1374530
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This mint quality piece is a Roman glass patella cup that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and is approximately 4.5 inches in diameter, by 1.5 inches high. This beautiful dark green glass piece is mint quality, has a thick honey brown patina seen mostly on the outer surfaces, and an iridescent silvery milky-white patina seen mostly on the inner surfaces. There is also some attractive minute root marking and some dark black mineral deposits seen within the thick encrusted surface patina. This piece has an applied ring base, a folded ring running around the rim, a raised inner base, and a pontil-mark on the bottom. This piece is also thin walled, and is very light in weight for it's size, and as such, is a rare example for the type. This piece is known as a "patella cup" due to it's design, and is one of the best examples for the type with it's exquisite patina. For an analogous example see: John Hayes, "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum", Toronto, 1975, no. 196, pl. 171. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1402085
Apolonia Ancient Art
$625.00
This mint quality Etruscan vessel is a two-handled kotyle type vessel, and dates to the Late Geometric Period, circa 7th century B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 3.7 inches high, by 7.5 inches wide from handle to handle, and is in mint quality condition with no repair and/or restoration. This piece has a slightly indented rim, two applied strap handles, and a ring base with a flat bottom. This piece was made from a light tan terracotta, and has a light orange/red slip with a banded design seen on the inner and outer surfaces. This piece also has some spotty light brown and white calcite mineral deposits, and is in it's natural "as found" condition. This piece is an exceptional example for the type, and the Geometric Period banded design is very attractive. Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's-1970's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1352271
Apolonia Ancient Art
$8,675.00
This extremely rare ceramic is a Moche culture piece that dates to the Moche Period IV, circa 400-600 A.D. This erotic piece is approximately 8 inches high, by 7.8 inches wide, and is in intact mint quality condition with no repair/restoration. This piece also has superb surfaces with some attractive spotty dark black deposits, and some dark brown burnishing. This piece is a Moche "stirrup type" vessel, and has a dark red spout, along with two attached figures that is a seated woman wearing a dark orange/brown hooded cloak, and necklace; and a seated spirit figurine that is also seen wearing a cream colored cloak, ear flares, and a decorative hat with a tie that runs under the chin. The decorative hat also has some dark red "line design" features, and is of the type depicted on Moche "portrait type" vessels. The seated woman appears to be expressionless, and has one hand on her abdomen, and the other arm is seen grasping the back of the seated spirit figure. The seated spirit figure also has one arm behind the back of the seated woman, and the other hand is tucked under the cloak of the seated woman and appears to be engaged in the act of masturbating the woman's genital organs. The woman also appears to have an open eyed serene, but transfixed expression. The spirit figure also has a wide smile with his tongue extended out, and in addition to the narrowing almond eyes, these facial features convey a very powerful and licentious expression. The facial expressions of both figures seen on this piece, together portray an erotic image that is so well executed, one could easily label this piece a masterpiece of Moche erotic and pre-Columbian art. The face of this spiritual being is also humanoid, as the extended lower jaw and mouth have primate features. This piece truly conveys Moche erotic art at it's height, and in the Moche mind, the erotic composition of this vessel may have simply referred to the human nature of reproduction and the joy of sex, which in their mind, was a gift from their gods. The exceptional piece offered here is extremely rare, and the only other known recorded example of this type is seen in the Museo Larco Museum in Lima, Peru. (This Museo Larco Museum piece is also published in "Checan: Essays on Erotic Elements in Peruvian Art", by Rafael Larco Hoyle, Nagel Pub., 1965, p. 121. This piece was also likely produced from the same molds as the piece offered here. See attached photo.) Another reason why Moche erotic vessels of this type are extremely rare, is that the Spanish colonizers who uncovered Moche erotic vessels regarded these pieces as manifestations of something sinful. The Spanish were scandalized by the ceramic's graphic detailing of sex between humans, skeletons, animals, and Moche anthropomorphic deities; and according to Northwestern professor of Anthropology and Sexuality Studies Mary Weismantel: "Moche sex pottery is the largest and most graphic and explicit of all pre-Columbian cultures." The colonial Spanish were shaken to their Catholic core, and over the years, they smashed numerous and rare examples of Moche erotic pottery to bits, and even criminalized the ownership of such pottery, as these Moche erotic ceramics often depicted premarital and non-reproductive sex acts. Even today, the erotic collection of Moche pottery seen at the Museo Larco Museum in Lima, is kept in a secluded separate room. A few years ago they were kept under lock and key at the bottom of the Museum of Archaeology, reserved for only the most educated of eyes; those of social scientists and scholors, and for the rest of the population, the erotic pottery was deemed far too provocative. It's also interesting to note that this piece shows no nudity relative to both of the figures seen on this powerful piece, as they are both fully clothed, but yet, it is the provocative nature of this piece that truly defines this piece as a masterpiece of pre-Columbian art. This extremely rare piece also has a TL Authenticity test document from Gutachten Lab, Germany, no. 03250811. Ex: Dr. Gottfried Freiherr von Marienfels collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including the TL document noted above, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1262216
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This extremely rare piece is a complete Greek bronze mitra piece that dates to the Geometric Period, circa 8th-7th century B.C. This piece is approximately 5.1 inches high by 7.25 inches wide, is intact with no repair/restoration, and is complete save for a small missing tip of one side. This piece was designed to be suspended from a belt, and likely hung below the rim of a bronze bell corselet. The shape of this piece also suggests that it protected the stomach and lower abdomen, and perhaps each side of the hips as well, with more than one piece attached to a leather belt. There are two holes seen at each end of the central stem which likely held rings that attached to the leather belt. This method of attachment allowed this piece to freely move at the bottom, and allowed the warrior ease of movement as this piece was able to move with the body. According to Herbert Hoffmann in "Early Cretan Armorers", Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1972, pp. 9-10: "The Cretan mitra was designed to be suspended from a belt and to hang below the rim of the bell corselet. The total absence from the find of anything that might be identified as part of a metal belt suggests that the mitrai were worn from a belt of perishable material. Most examples are semicircular sheets of bronze 5 to 7.5mm thick, varying in height from 12.5 to 18 cms. and in breadth from 21.5 to 29.5 cms. The edges of their wide flat rims are sometimes rolled over a bronze wire, the straight upper edge being rolled outward and the edge of the crescent inward. Three holes are punched in the sheet metal near the top edge, one at the center and one at each end, to accommodate rings from which the mitra was suspended. The function of these bronze plates as stomach protectors was recognized by Furtwangler when he published the first examples discovered at Olympia. F. Poulsen gave them the Homeric name 'mitra' in his publication of the specimen from Rethymnon, and the term has had archaeological respectability ever since (although what sort of body armor Homer meant is highly debatable). In endeavoring to define the role played by mitrai in Greek combat we must take into account their geographical distribution. This form of armor is to date documented only from Crete, Thrace, and Etruria - three regions of the ancient world noted for their archers. It seems likely that mitrai were meant to protect their wearers against arrows, i.e. that they were worn by hoplites frequently exposed to archery attack." (An example published by Hoffmann in the reference noted above, pl. 40, no. 3, is slightly larger than the example offered here, has three suspension rings, and has a half crescent shape. See attached photo.) The piece offered here has a slightly different design than the known examples published by Hoffmann in the reference noted above, and the design of this piece may point to Cyprus, and if this is the case, the piece offered here may be one of the earliest examples of it's type, and pre-dates the published Hoffmann examples that date circa mid to late 7th century B.C. The inside of the exceptional piece offered here also likely had a leather liner, and/or had a thick leather pad which attached to the additional perimeter holes seen on this piece. This piece also has fine workmanship, as there are raised punched round knobs that are seen running around the perimeter of the piece. These knobs, besides being very decorative, also add strength to the overall piece. This piece has a beautiful light green patina with some heavy dark green and blue mineralization, along with some white calcite deposits, and the patina and mineral deposits are also heavier on the backside of this piece. Greek armor from this early period is extremely rare, and even fragments from this period are seldom seen on the market. This piece is attached to a custom stand and can easily be removed. Ex: M. Waltz collection, Germany, circa 1970's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: