Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #782558
Apolonia Ancient Art
$395.00
This nice Greek "Xenon ware" ceramic cup dates circa 375-350 B.C., and is approximately 3.1 inches high, by 4.5 inches wide including the extended single handle. This piece has a very attractive form, and is intact with no repair and/or restoration. This Greek ceramic is classified as "Xenon ware", and was named after a kantharos that is now in Frankfurt, Germany that bears the inscription "XENON". This type of pottery represents a further aspect of Apulian pottery, which may be a combination of native Greek art from southern Italy and Greek art from Attica (mainland Greece). This piece has a deep glossy black glaze seen both on the inner and outer surfaces, and has matt orange/red designs. "Xenon ware" usually displays decorative motifs such as laurel, wave patterns, ivy leaf, and chevrons. This piece has a key pattern that runs around the center of the vessel, with chevron lines above. The condition of this intact piece in mint, and has no minute breaks and/or chips. The painted key design is missing in sections, and this is common, as the paint was often added after the ceramic was fired and/or was a thin application. This nice piece also has no over paint, has some spotty white calcite deposits, and some minute root marking. A superb example for the type. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.). I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1319158
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
These two scarce bronze pieces are from the Urnfield culture, and date late Bronze Age, circa 13th-10th century B.C. These two matching detailed pieces are each approximately 4 to 3.6 inches in diameter, as they are elliptical in shape. They each have an opening that is approximately 1.22 inches wide, and these were made to fit on the upper or lower arm. Each piece also has an incised "line-and-herringbone" design that is seen running around the entire outer edge of each piece, and runs from each terminal end to terminal end. This incised design is very detailed, and can easily be seen some distance from each piece. These pieces are in mint "as found" condition, and have no repair/restoration. They also have an even and beautiful dark blue to dark green patina that is exceptional. It is also more likely that these pieces were votive, and were not intended to be worn every day, but it may also be possible that these pieces were worn for special ceremonial events. This type of piece has also been found in votive hoard offerings, and the pieces offered here could also have been created entirely for this purpose, as bronze was extremely valuable at the time that these pieces were created. The Urnfield Culture, circa 1300 B.C.-750 B.C., was a late Bronze Age culture of central Europe, and it's name comes from the custom of cremating the dead and placing their ashes in urns which were then buried in fields. The Urnfield culture followed the Tumulus culture and was succeeded by the Hallstatt culture. Linguistic evidence and continuity with the subsequent Hallstatt culture suggests that the people of this area spoke an early form of celtic, perhaps originally proto-Celtic. It's also notable that the early Urnfield period, circa 1300 B.C., was a time when the warriors of central Europe were often heavily armored with body armor, helmets, and shields all made of bronze. The Urnfield culture has votive weapons, bronze pins, and bracelets such as the pieces offered here, that often have been found in warrior's graves. This prolific amount of bronze weapons and objects, attributed to this culture, likely borrowed the idea and burial customs from Mycenaean Greece. These pieces also hang from an included custom display stand. These solid pieces have a great deal of eye appeal and can easily be worn today. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1351962
Apolonia Ancient Art
$8,675.00
This powerful Greco-Roman marble bust is a portrait of a young god that dates to the late Hellenistic period, circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 4.9 inches high, and was once part of a statuette. This piece portrays a young god wearing a Greek Hellenistic "Attic" type helmet, and has a slightly upturned head, along with the head slightly tilted to the left that is also seen bending away form the angled neck. In addition, the eyes are slightly upturned which is a god-like attribute relative to Greek Hellenistic art. The eyes also being deeply inset also draws the viewer to the fleshy lips that are also added features of early Hellenistic Greek period art that was established by Lysippos, who produced striking portraits of Alexander the Great. (For the artistic style related to the portraiture of Alexander the Great that is attributed to Lysippos, see the attached photo from the "Search of Alexander" exhibit catalog, 1980, no. 25. This photo is of a marble bust of Alexander the Great now seen in the Pella Museum, Greece, and was executed in the 2nd century B.C. as a portrait that represented Alexander as a romantic divinity in the late Hellenistic period.) The attractive marble bust offered here also follows this earlier artistic sculptural style, and is very analogous in artistic style to the Pella example noted above. The piece offered here also likely represents the Greek and Roman war gods Ares and Mars, but the likeness seen here of this young warrior god also represents many known portraits of Alexander the Great, and in effect, this piece could have represented and doubled both as a god and Alexander. (For the portrait type see: A. Stewart, "Faces of Power, Alexander's Image and Hellenistic Politics".) This piece has some minor losses to the nose and to the lower chin, otherwise it is a complete example. This piece also has some spotty root marking, and a beautiful light brown patina over a bright white Parian type marble. This piece is an attractive example, and is an excellent representation of late Hellenistic period Greek art which also has exceptional artistic style. This exceptional piece is also mounted on a steel pin along with a custom Plexiglas display base. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1130376
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This appealing piece is a Greek terracotta mask that is in the form of a young God and/or King. This piece dates circa 2nd-1st century B.C., and is approximately 4.9 inches high by 4.7 inches wide. This intact piece is complete, and has spotty dark black and brown earthern deposits both on the front and back side surfaces. This beautiful piece was mold made from a light tan terracotta, and has sharp detail. This piece is in the form of a young God and/or King who is seen with an upward gaze, and is wearing a diadem band on the forehead. The diadem band is also a Greek Hellenistic symbol of royalty, along with being an emblem of sovereignty, and this mask may also portray a king and/or a character in an ancient Greek play. This terracotta mask is a votive type piece, and is likely a tragic type theater mask. Votive masks of this type were often dedicated to shrines by individuals who were linked to the theater, and were often dedicated after a trilogy of plays were performed that recounted one of the serious mythological dramas. The single hole seen at the top of the forehead also allowed this piece to hang as a votive offering, and is a scarce type. This piece also hangs on a custom black plexiglas stand, and has a great deal of eye appeal. Ex: David Leibert collection, New York, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1351887
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This rare and esoteric piece is an Olmec seated duck poison bottle that dates circa 1100-800 B.C. This vessel is attributed to the Las Bocas region of Mexico, and is approximately 2.4 inches high. This piece has an attractive lustrous black glaze, along with some spotty light brown burnishing that is seen on all of the outer surfaces of the vessel. This piece is also intact, and has no repair/restoration. This piece is also in the form of a hollow container, as the top of the head has an opening into the hollow section of the lower body. This type of vessel is also known as a "poison bottle", as they generally held a substance such as red cinnabar or another hallucinogenic powder or liquid. This vessel was likely used in a ceremonial capacity, and this was likely the case for the majority of glazed Olmec vessels that depict birds such as ducks, raptors, and songbirds. (Another analogous "poison bottle" vessel of this type portraying a raptor is seen in "The Olmec World: Ritual and Rulership", Princeton University, 1996, Harry Abrams Pub., no. 61, p. 183. See attached photo.) The esoteric vessel offered here has a very animated face with dotted eyes, and two squat legs and an extended tail that serve as a tripod base for the vessel. There is also a "double dot-and-bar" symbol seen between the eyes, and the eyes also appear to represent dots as well. The "four-dots-and-bar" motif is also thought to represent the "axis mundi", as the conduit between the Olmec natural and supernatural realms, and the two dotted eyes together with the "double dot-and-bar" symbol, may be a representation of the "four-dots-and-bar" motif. The symbolism seen on this piece also reinforces the theory that this piece was created as a ceremonial type vessel. This piece is an exceptional example of Olmec ceramic art, and is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Ferdinand Anton collection, Germany, circa 1959. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1119822
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This cute piece is a Greco-Roman bronze that is in the form of a bull's head, and this piece dates circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 1.5 inches high by 2 inches wide, and weighs approximately 122.5 gms. This piece is a weight that was designed for a steelyard weight scale, which was a bar that was suspended by a chain that acted as a swivel, and this bar had a chain suspended tray at each end. The scarce weight offered here was simply placed on one of the trays, as this weight was designed with a flat bottom and this piece stands upright. This piece also has a hole that runs through the middle of the neck, and a bar/chain could have also suspended this weight on the steelyard scale bar as well. This attractive piece has floppy ears, almond shaped eyes, and cropped horns. The horns could have also been cropped in antiquity in order to conform this weight to a specific weight of 122.5 gms. This piece also has a beautiful dark blue-green patina, with some dark blue and light brown surface deposits, which lends this attractive a high degree of eye appeal. This piece sits on a custom plexiglas display stand that is also included. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1367763
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This superb piece is a Veracruz/Mayan tripod plate vessel that dates to the Early Postclassic Period, circa 900-1200 A.D., and is approximately 12.4 inches in diameter, by 5 inches high. This piece is made from a dark red clay, and has a dark orange glaze that covers the entire piece. There are also three incised decorative boxes that are evenly spaced on the outer bowl, and these boxes have a dark gray/black glaze with cream colored incised lines. These boxes contain geometric patterns that may represent solar symbols, and these decorative elements are identical, save for the addition of a single circle added in Box B, seen with four circles, with yet another additional circle added in Box C, seen with five circles. Together, the three boxes likely represent a single complex concept, such as the movement of the planets, or perhaps representing a symbolic reference to the "Palenque Triad". There is also a symbol seen on the bottom central section of the bowl, and this may be a solar symbol and/or a sky symbol as well. This piece also has three rounded legs that are designed as a rattle, and all three legs are functional. There is also a slightly flared flat rim, with evenly spaced decorative black bands that are seen on the top flat rim surface. This piece is intact with no apparent repair/restoration, and is in superb condition with a very vibrant glaze. In addition, there are some spotty black mineral deposits. (Another analogous piece of this type and size was offered in Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, May 1990, no. 236. $1,500.00-$2,000.00 estimates. See attached photo.) This piece is also relatively scarce on the market not only for the type, but also for the intact condition. Ex: Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1970's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1323656
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This attractive Greek silver triobol was minted in Phokis in central Greece during the Classical Period, circa 460-430 B.C. This coin weighs 3.0 gms, has a dark gray patina, and is in extremely fine condition (EF/EF). The obverse of this interesting coin has a facing bull, and the reverse features the bust of Artemis facing right, with her hair bound with a fillet. The face of this young goddess also has a pleasing smile that is also designed with an earlier "Archaic Period" artistic style. There are four letters seen around the bust of this young goddess, with each letter seen at each corner of the incuse square, and these letters represent the name of "Phokis". The facing bull seen on the obverse may also represent a sacrificial bull, and has very high relief. The coin offered here is a superb example for the type, as most of these examples are found in Very Fine grade (VF), and have a great deal of wear. References: Sear 2348. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1339702
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,875.00
This extremely rare piece is a Roman bronze armor plaque that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 4.75 inches high, by 2.2 inches wide at the top, and the high relief of this piece is about .25 inches. This striking piece has a beautiful dark green patina with some spotty dark red highlights, along with some spotty light to dark green mineralization seen mostly on the backside of the piece. In addition, this piece has some spotty gilt "tinning" seen in various sections of the front side of the piece. This piece was likely fitted into an armored cuirass below a shoulder plaque, and this cuirass likely had duplicate pieces that were also fitted into the cuirass on the other side of the chest. This piece may also have been interwoven into the fabric of the cuirass, and there is a square attachment slot seen at the bottom of the piece. This piece was hand beaten over a mold, and depicts a very muscular standing nude Mars holding a shield on the ground with his left hand, and in the right, he is holding and leaning on a spear. He is also seen wearing a helmet, and has a cloak draped over his arms. The muscular Roman war god Mars is also seen standing over a sea-panther with a coiled tail, and the entire scene is framed by a dotted border. There are very few Roman plaque armor examples such as the piece offered here, and most plaques are fragmentary, and are not complete and intact as the exceptional piece offered here. In addition, the majority of Roman armor was constructed with several bronze pieces which attached to a leather and/or fabric cuirass, and most of these sectional bronze pieces are individual finds. This piece is also in mint to superb condition, and has no repair/restoration, cracks, or chips. This type of piece is also analogous to another example that depicts the nude Roman war god Mars standing over a sea-panther, and is seen in Christie's Antiquities, "The Axel Gutmann Collection, Part I", London, Nov. 22, no. 87. (See the attached photo of this piece which is a shoulder plaque that is approximately 5.5 inches high, by 2.8 inches wide, circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., $6,300.00-$9,300.00 estimates.) For this type of armor, see M.C. Bishop and J.C.N. Coulston, "Roman Military Equipemt", London, 1993, pp. 139-142. This piece is mounted into a custom Plexiglas stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1990's. (Note: additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Faience : Pre AD 1000 item #1161417
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This attractive piece is an Egyptian faience amulet of a seated Bastet, which dates circa 1100-800 B.C., Late New Kingdom/3rd Intermediate Period. This piece is approximately 2.25 inches high, and is a large example for the type. This intact and complete piece is a seated Bastet lion headed goddess that is seen holding a shrine-shaped sistrum, and is a rarer type than what is normally seen, which is the more common openwork hoop-shaped sistrum. The sistrum was a rattling musical instrument that was connected with ceremony, festivity, and merry-making. This sistrum attribute identifies this amulet as being Bastet, rather than the lion headed goddess Sekhmet, which is often the case, and according to Carol Andrews in "Amulets of Ancient Egypt", University of Texas Press, 1994, p. 32: "Of all the mained lion goddesses who were revered for their fierceness Bastet alone was 'transmogrified' into the less terrible cat, although even she often retained a lion-head when depicted as a woman, thus causing much confusion in identification. The female cat was particularly noted for its fecundity and so Bastet was adored as goddess of fertility and, with rather less logic, of festivity and intoxication. This is why, as a cat-headed woman, she carries a menyet collar with aegis-capped counterpoise and rattles a sistrum." In addition, Andrews states on p. 33: "All such pieces must have been worn by women to place them under the patronage of the goddess and perhaps endow them with her fecundity. They were essentially to be worn for life, but could have potency in the Other World." The piece offered here has a suspension hoop seen behind the head, and there is no apparent wear within this hoop which suggests that this attractive piece was votive, and this may also explain it's mint quality condition as well. The seated goddess is seen on an elaborate openwork throne whose sides are formed into the sinuous body of the Egyptian snake god Nehebkau. This rare faience amulet has nice minute spotty dark brown mineral deposits that are seen over a light green/blue glaze, and this piece is in mint condition, with no cracks and/or chips, which are often seen on faience amulets of this large size. The molding of this piece has exceptional detail, and compares to an analogous example of the same type and size seen in Christie's Antiquities, Paris, March 2008, lot no. 115. (7,000.00-10,000.00 Euro estimates, 5,625 Euros realized. Note: This piece has the more common hoop-shaped sistrum, and is from the Charles Gillot collection, circa 1853-1903. See attached photo.) The piece offered here comes with a clear plexiglas display stand, and simply sits on the top surface, and can be easily lifted off. An exceptional large piece that is in mint condition, and is also a rare type. Ex: Robert Rustafjaell collection, circa 1890-1909. Published: "An Egyptian Collection formed by R. de Rustafjaell Bey", by the Ehrich Galleries, New York. Ex: Heckscher Museum of Art, Long Island, New York, deaccessioned circa 2011.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1325706
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This very rare coin is a silver diobol attributed to the city mint of Kebren, Troas, in Asia Minor. This coin is dated circa 480-450 B.C., and is in about extremely fine condition (EF-/EF). This coin is approximately 1.3 gms, is 8mm in diameter, and has a dark gray patina. This coin features a bust of a female goddess facing left, and has "Archaic Period" type artistic style with a slight smile and braded hair. The reverse features a bust of a ram facing left, within an incuse punch square. The female bust on the obverse has been attributed as representing Apollo, but this image is likely a "Korai", as this bust is seen with earrings along with the long braded hair. The "Korai" were also female goddess that were prominently displayed in ancient Athens with the analogous female smiling faces as seen on this coin. Another example of this extremely rare coin was offered by Numismatica Ars Classica AG, Zurich, Switzerland, May 2017, Auction 100, no. 1119. (500 Swiss Francs estimate. This coin is also graded Very Fine Plus. VF+.) The attractive coin offered here is not only an extremely rare coin seldom seen on the market in this condition, but it is also a rare depiction of a "Korai" goddess. References: SNG von Aulock 1546; Rosen 534. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Metalwork : Pre AD 1000 item #862556
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This scarce piece is a bronze ring that is from the Luristan culture that dwelled in Western Iran, circa 1000-800 B.C., Iron Age II. This object was cast as one solid piece, is approximately 4.9 inches in diameter, and is very heavy, as it is approximately .5 inches thick. This beautiful piece is in superb condition and has an exceptional dark green patina with light brown and reddish highlights. This massive adornment was worn above the bicep on the upper arm, and was considered to be a very valuable object by this culture. This piece was likely clamped on the upper arm of a warrior individual who wore this piece for life, and this piece has a high degree of smooth wear on the inner surfaces, which is a good indication that the owner wore this piece for a considerable length of time. The Luristan culture was a tribal society of mixed small-scale agriculturalists and pastoralists, raising sheep and goats, many horses, and perhaps using chariots where the terrain permitted. The wealth of this culture was concentrated in the hands of a warrior aristocracy who patronized the metal smiths, and they considered bronze very valuable, as it could be fashioned over and over again into weapons. This culture was highly skilled in the arts of war, and perhaps only the Spartans could have been as skilled in the use of their weapons. This piece has attractive decorative chevrons and checker-band patterns that were engraved into the metal. These designs are also seen on the ceramics for the period. (For other bronze armlets of this type see: "Ancient Bronzes, Ceramics, and Seals" by P.R.S. Moorey, Los Angeles County Museum of Art Pub., 1981, nos. 611-613.) A custom stand is included. Ex: Private German collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1357958
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This exceptional piece is a Greek/Scythian iron short sword that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 3rd-2nd century B.C. This attractive iron weapon is larger than most examples, and is approximately 12.9 inches high, by 3.5 inches wide at the hilt which is in the middle section of the piece. This scarce iron piece is dark brown, and has some spotty light brown highlights. This piece was also hand forged from iron, and is a "four-part construction" type piece. This piece is made up with a "V-shaped blade", a "decorative curved hilt", a "handle bar", and a "pommel end bar" that has a single rivet that holds it onto the "handle bar". This rivet is made from a section of the "handle bar" that fitted through the "pommel end bar", and was hammered down over the "pommel end bar" which holds it in place. The "decorative curved hilt" is identical on each side of the piece, and it gives a very esoteric look to the piece as well. The overall construction is very solid, and this piece is a very durable weapon. The "V-shaped blade" also has hammered "blood lines" down the center, and this strengthened the "V-shaped blade" and allowed for a tight fit in a scabbard. There is also a grooved "slot" seen on one side of the "handle bar", and this likely held a wooden or bone handle into place that was fitted over the "handle bar". The condition of this piece is superb to mint quality, and is one of the best recorded iron examples of this type of weapon. The surface has some minor pitting from hammering and wear, and the piece was conditioned by a major museum in Germany. This piece has no repair/restoration, and there is some minute fill at the extreme tip end, which has also prevented the tip from breaking off. This piece is of the type that has been found in ancient Thrace, and the region around the Black Sea. Overall, an exceptional large example with excellent preservation and metal quality. This piece also sits on a custom metal display stand. Another analogous example was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, 2017, No. HM1102. (This Royal Athena Galleries piece is nearly the same length as the piece offered here, 11.25 inches long, and has some wear and losses. The Royal Athena piece is also offered at $7500.00. See attached photo.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #678982
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This extremely rare piece is a bronze geometric horse that was cast in one solid piece. This attractive piece was made during the Geometric Period, circa 8th century B.C., and is approximately 3.1 inches high by 2.8 inches long. This piece is extremely early for the culture, and this can be seen relative to the artistic style with the elongated neck. This piece was probably part of a sacred necklace that may have been votive, and may have been shamanistic in nature. The stylized horse seen here may have been created as a "spirit" type animal, and this may explain the design. The design of the piece is also an early Geometric Period convention of art, and during this period, animals were designed with legs, tails, and necks that were elongated and thin. This piece also has a hoop seen on the top part of the body that connected this piece to the main body of the necklace by a chain. The hoop seen on the top part of the body may also have been broken in antiquity in order to break the "mana" and/or magic of the piece, and consequently, this piece may also have been votive. There were probably several animals and/or amulets connected to this type of necklace in antiquity, and the geometric horse pendant offered here is analogous to a piece that is now seen in the Museo di Villa Giulia, Rome (Inventory no. 53438, listed as being found at Palestrina, dated circa 8th-6th century B.C.). The bronze animals seen in the Museo di Villa Giulia example are also approximately one third of the size of the piece offered here. The Museo di Villa Giulia piece is a complete necklace, and has long-necked horse pendants, and small round shields that are individually connected to the necklace by attachment chains. The extremely rare piece offered here has a dark green patina with dark red highlights, and the dark red highlights are due to a high concentration of tin within the mix of metals. This piece is complete, except for the incomplete hoop, and it sits on a clear custom plexiglas base. (Another rare analogous example was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, and was published in "Art of the Ancient World", Vol. XVIII, 2007, no. 58, $7,500.00 estimate. See attached photo.) Ex: F. Hirsch collection. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to culture, date, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1353952
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This extremely rare coin is a Greek silver drachm from the Epirote Republic, and dates circa 234-168 B.C. This coin is in good extremely fine/extremely fine (EF+/EF) condition, weighs 5.0 grams, and is approximately 21mm in diameter. This coin has on the obverse: a detailed and laureate bust of Zeus facing left, a monogram at the lower front of the bust, and a Greek legend below and behind. The reverse has: a standing eagle on a thunderbolt facing left, with the legend ADEI before, and PUTAN behind, all within a laurel wreath that is seen framing the border. The legend seen on the obverse is extremely rare, and may refer to the magistrate that minted the coin and/or the name of the current ruler of the Epirote Republic. This coin may also be the only known recorded example with this obverse legend. The reverse legend refers to the Epirote Republic itself. The artistic style of the Zeus bust also has an extremely high degree of art, and is a better style that what is usually seen on the scarce coinage of this type. Another example of this coin type, without the obverse legend and the Zeus bust facing right, was sold by Numismatica Ars Classica in Zurich, Switzerland for 1,300 SF. The coin offered here is not only an extremely rare type, but is also a superb grade (good extremely fine). References: Franke, Epirus, 32ff (var.); SNG Cop 114. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #583883
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This mint quality Roman glass bottle dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 6.3 inches high by 5.3 inches in diameter. This attractive piece has an extended flat and thin upper rim which is intact, and as such, is a rare example for the type, as most Roman glass vessels of this type have a cracked and/or broken upper rim. This vessel also has an exceptional multi-colored patina, and is much better than most examples of this type, as the patina is very thick in sections. This vessel is also a light blue-green color, and it has light brown and white calcite deposits that are seen both on the inside and outside surfaces. (See "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum" no. 146, p.58, for an analogous example.) The piece offered here is seldom seen on the market in this quality. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1237476
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This animated piece is a squatting figurine that is from the Nazca-Wari culture, circa Middle Horizon, 600-700 A.D. This interesting piece is approximately 5 inches high, and has a flat bottom base. This figurine likely represents a squatting male who is seen holding a ball upwards with his right hand, and his left hand is also raised to his left ear lobe which appears to be bleeding. This blood is also seen running down his left arm, and his facial expression is very animated with his crooked mouth. This crooked mouth may also be a representation from his injury to the left side of his head, which also may represent a stroke and/or a cranial injury. The figurine is also seen wearing a cloak with geometric patterns, and it may be that the person depicted here may also have been a ballplayer. The raising of the ball in his right hand may also be a sign of victory in the ancient Mesoamerican ballgame, and this may depict the point of victory in the game. This piece is also a ceremonial whistle vessel, and makes a high pitched noise when one blows into the bottom opening seen at the back side of this piece. There is also an opening for the whistle seen at the back side, and also two openings for the missing stirrup spout. This piece may also have been ceremoniously broken when it was buried, with the stirrup spout discarded, and perhaps this was linked to the fact that this piece may have portrayed an actual person. This piece was also collected by Dr. Ernst J. Fischer who collected Pre-Columbian ceramics that displayed medical related diseases and/or conditions. The condition of this piece is also superb to mint quality, and is intact save for the missing stirrup handle. The white, gray, light red, and black colors are very vibrant, and have a high degree of eye appeal. This piece was also one of the favorite pieces of Dr. Fischer, and is one of the rare examples of Andean Pre-Columbian art that likely displays a medical condition such as an injury and/or stroke of an individual. In addition, the injury depicted here may have been self inflicted and/or initiated to relieve the condition of stroke, but it is more likely that this injury was the result of playing in the ballgame. It is also interesting to note that the face of this individual is divided into two parts, with one half of the face depicted in light red, and the other half, in light gray. This piece is also a rare medical related type of ceramic, and is seldom seen on the market. An analogous piece from this culture was offered at Sotheby's African, Oceanic & Pre-Columbian Art, New York, May 2014, no. 203. (See attached photo. This complete open-topped vessel is approximately 5.5 inches high, and has analogous colors/design relative to the tunic and bilaterally colored face. $10,000.00-$15,000.00 estimates, $68,750.00 realized.) Ex: Auktion Ketterer 163, 1989, no. 337. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private German collection. Note: Additional documentation is included for the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #968903
Apolonia Ancient Art
$625.00
This charming piece is a black steatite spindal whorl that was used for weaving textiles. This pieces dates circa 3100-2600 B.C. and is likely Anatolian or Syrian, as the four figures seen on this piece are analogous to the figures seen on carved cylinder seals for the period and region. (See Sotheby's Antiquities, London, "Western Asiatic Cylinder seals and Antiquities from the Erlenmeyer Collection, Part 1", July 1992, no. 31-33.) Black steatite is very difficult to carve, as it is a very hard stone, and this adds to the rarity of this piece. In addition, this type of stone comes mostly from the Syrian region, and cylinder seals, rather than spindle whorls, are much more common. This piece is approximately 1.25 inches in diameter, by .5 inches high. This piece is conical in shape, has a hole bow drilled through the center, and has four separate registers with a figure within. Two of the figures seen in profile may be images of a deer, and a dog or a wolf. The other two images may be seen from the top, and may represent the same animals, but if seen in profile, they are very anthropomorphic, and its also possible that both views were meant to be portrayed. This piece has very minute root marking and striations that are seen on the entire piece which is a good sign of authenticity, in addition, there are mineral deposits seen in many of the low relief points. This piece is scarce to rare, and is in superb condition for the type. A custom stand is included. Ex: Private French collection. Ex: David Leibert collection, New York., circa 1990's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: