Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1246498
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This appealing piece is a standing nude Roman bronze Jupiter that dates circa 1st-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 3.5 inches high, and stands on its belonging square plinth. This standing nude figurine is seen holding an eagle in his outstretched right hand, and is also seen in the act of throwing a lightning bolt with his raised left arm. Jupiter, also known to the ancient Greeks as Zeus, is also seen wearing a cloak draped over his neck and left shoulder. This piece has exceptional facial, hair, and body molding detail which lends this piece a great deal of eye appeal. In addition, this piece has a young, erotic body design which is a Greek convention of art, and this can be seen with the slender legs and semi-muscular designed body. This piece is complete, save for the missing eagle's head, left hand, and probable lightning bolt which may have been in the left hand. This piece has a beautiful even dark to light green glossy patina, and the exceptional glossy patina seen on this Roman bronze figurine is scarce for figurines of this type. The footed bronze plinth also has additional bronze inside, and the bronze plinth is nearly solid, which added extra weight at the bottom of the piece. This extra weight allows this piece to solidly stand in an upright position. This piece was also cast from the top up, and the figurine and bronze plinth were cast as one piece. The bearded Jupiter is seen looking away to his right, and his weight is seen on his right leg in the act of throwing his lightning bolt. An analogous example can be seen in "Master Bronzes from the Classical World" by Mitten and Doeringer, New York, 1967, no. 266. (See attached photo.) A custom black and clear Plexiglas stand is included, and this piece simply sits on the stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1267080
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This nice piece is a Greek Cycladic marble idol that dates to the Early Bronze Age III, circa 2100-2300 B.C. This intact piece is approximately 4.5 inches high by 2.25 inches wide at the wider lower body, has no apparent repair/restoration, and is in better condition than most examples. This piece is intact, and is complete save for a small chip to the end of the left arm, and is a scarce variant with the "hair knot" that is seen at the top right side of the oval designed head. This piece also has a nice light gray patina with some minute black spotty mineral deposits. This piece is a representative of the female body, as the lower section of this piece has a lower rounded torso, and may represent a fertility figurine. This piece has an elongated neck, two knobby arms, a "violin-shaped" body, and this type of piece is also known as a "Violin-type Cycladic Idol". This piece also has an additional scarce feature which is also known as a "top hat", a "top and/or hair knot", or a "cranial lateral projection". This scarce stylized figurine with the "hair knot" is a variant of a class of idol that is found in the Cyclades, and also elsewhere in the ancient Near East. This variant has been called the "Kusura type" by Colin Renfrew, circa 1969, after the site where a number of examples were discovered. This type has also been found in Western Anatolia at sites such as Samos, Lebedos, Troy, and Karatas-Semayuk, and this may indicate that this type has a Western Anatolian origin. An analogous example was sold in Bonham's Antiquities, April 2010, no. 305, (This analogous piece is described as an "Anatolian Marble Idol, circa 2700-2100 B.C.", 3.9 inches high, a disk-shaped head with a lateral projection, repaired neck, and sold for $4,255.00 including premium. See attached photo.) The piece offered here simply hangs from a custom metal stand that has a heavy base, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv.#PAAYC000039. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1342810
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,865.00
This superb coin is a Greek gold stater of Alexander the Great, circa 323-320 B.C. This coin is in EF+/EF+ (Extremely Fine+/Extremely Fine+), otherwise known as "Superb condition" which is slightly below Mint State grade, and is 8.6 gms. This coin was minted in Miletos, and was struck under Philoxenos, who was a general of Alexander the Great. After Alexander the Great's return from Egypt in 331 B.C., Philoxenos was appointed to superintend the collection of the tribute in the provinces north of the Taurus Mountains. In the subsequent distribution of the provinces after the death of Alexander in 323 B.C., Philoxenus was appointed by Perdiccas to succeed Philotas in the government of Cilicia circa 321 B.C. In that same year during the partition of the provinces at Triparadisus after the fall of Perdiccas, Philoxenus was allowed to retain his satrapy of Cilicia, and this was likely the period that the coin offered here was minted. The obverse of this attractive coin features the helmeted head of Athena facing right, and is wearing a crested Corinthian helmet with a coiled serpent. There are also coiled locks of hair seen on the cheek and neck, which is a unique feature of this obverse die and coin type. The reverse has a finely detailed and exceptional standing figure of Nike holding a victory wreath in her extended right hand, and a stylis in the left hand. The Nike seen on the reverse of this coin is also one of the best examples seen on a coin of this type, as one can see the minute facial details that are not normally seen. There is also a (Delta H) monogram in the left field. Another example of the same type and grade was offered by Larry Goldberg Coins & Collectibles, Auction 72, no. 4047, $2,500.00-$3,000.00 estimates, $5000.00 realized. References: Price 2078; SNG Ashmolean 2774. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1372929
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,375.00
This attractive Greek Apulian squat lekythos dates circa mid 4th century B.C., and is approximately 5.8 inches high. This piece has vibrant black, white, and dark orange colors, and features a draped woman moving to the right and looking back over her right shoulder. She is also seen holding a decorative plate in her extended right hand, and a wreath in her left hand. There is also a circle seen in the field below her right hand holding the decorative plate, and this may be a workshop control mark. This piece has a single handle attached to the main body of the vessel and the extended neck. There is also a decorative dark orange palmate pattern seen below the handle. The top of the vessel has a flat rim, and this was an aid in the flow of a valuable oily unguent, and enabled the owner of the vessel to apply small amounts of liquid from the rim. Another analogous piece of this type was offered by Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, June 2008, no. 87 ($600.00-$900.00 estimates, $3,438.00 realized.) The piece offered here is intact, save for some minor stress cracks seen in the extended neck, and overall, is a superb example with vibrant colors. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1295397
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This beautiful Greek coin is a silver drachm attributed to the mint and city of Larissa, and dates circa 400-380 B.C. This piece is approximately 20mm in diameter, weighs 6.15 g., and is in EF-/EF condition. This piece also has extremely high relief and the obverse features the beautiful facing head of the nymph Larissa; and the reverse shows a grazing horse standing right on a ground line, with Greek lettering below meaning "Larissa". There is also the minute lettering "AI" seen below the belly of the horse, and this represents the signature of the die artist. According to C. Lorber in "The Silver Facing Head Coins of Larissa", Early Classification, Type 3: "The artist 'AI' became the mint's chief engraver, displacing he who signed himself 'SIMO', and the present dies are among the finest in the entire series." The coin offered here is one of the earliest dies of the series, and the early dies of the series had the two artist signatures noted above. In addition, the flank of the standing horse has a brand that appears to be the Greek letter "X". This "X" brand is also one of the few known examples, and appears only on this particular reverse die. It is unknown as to the meaning of this brand, and as this coin was signed by the artist, there certainly has to be a meaning behind this symbol. The early series with the facing heads of the mint Larissa predating circa 380 B.C., are the most desirable among collectors, and have a high degree of art. The attractive facing head seen here is leaning to the left, as the right shoulder is raised, and the female image has flowing hair that appears to be moving with the wind. The artist was able to convey a great deal of movement on the obverse, and in contrast, a complete sense of calm is conveyed on the reverse with the standing and grazing horse. This coin type, along with the artist's signature, is also considered by many numismatists to be a masterpiece, not only within the series, but also for the period. An exceptional coin of great beauty which is now scarce on the market. C. Lorber, Early Classification, no. 20.2. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1990's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1335899
Apolonia Ancient Art
$7,685.00
This superb Greek bronze is a solid cast handle with the top section of an oinochoe that dates to the late Archaic Period, circa 520-490 B.C., and is approximately 8 inches high by 5.25 inches in diameter. This piece consists of the upper part of a bronze oinochoe, and it has an amazing designed lion handle that has exceptional detail. This handle was cast as one piece and is very solid. The handle also has a well defined acanthus palmette design at the terminal end, and is solidly attached to the main body of the vessel. The handle has a detailed lion's main which runs up the handle, and away from the realistic designed lion's head that is seen with an open mouth and an extended tongue. The realistic design of the lions head is truly a great work of art, as the minute design is very fine and has exquisite realistic features. This facing lion's head is seen facing the inner spout of the vessel, and this design is a Greek "Archaic Period" convention of art. This impressive piece also has a dainty ivy leaf and tendril floral pattern that is seen running around the neck of the vessel. This beautiful piece also has an exceptional dark green/blue patina, and some light to dark brown deposits. Another analogous example was offered in Christie's Antiquities, Leo Mildenberg collection, Dec. 2011, no. 98. ($4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates, $5000.00 realized. This piece does not have the detail, nor the superb artistic style of the superb vessel offered here.) The piece offered here is an exceptional "Archaic Period" Greek bronze, and is seldom seen on the market. A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #824649
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,375.00
This interesting piece is from the Jama-Coaque culture that lived in the tropical forest coast region of northern Ecuador near the Esmeraldas River. This area is also the region where the Spaniards first encountered the native South Americans. The piece offered here is approximately 10 inches high, dates circa 500 B.C.-500 A.D., and is intact, save for some missing coffee bean ends seen on the headdress and a very small section of the headdress behind the right ear, and this may have been done as this piece was a burial offering. These breaks appear to be very old, as there is wear in the break areas with burial deposits, and this may have been done to break the "mana" and/or magic of the piece for burial. The seated figurine may be a shaman that is seen wearing a headdress, shirt, earrings, and nose ring that are decorated with coffee bean symbols. He also has coffee bean designed eyes and is seen holding a lime pot in his right hand and in his left, a coca pod. (For the type see: "Pre-Columbian Art" by Jose Alcina Franch, Abrams Pub., New York, 1983, no. 595.) There are traces of painted designs seen on the lower legs, headdress, and skirt. This piece has spotty black mineral deposits and some minute root marking. An example and type that is now scarce on the market. Ex: Private Arizona collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1357958
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This exceptional piece is a Greek/Scythian iron short sword that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 3rd-2nd century B.C. This attractive iron weapon is larger than most examples, and is approximately 12.9 inches high, by 3.5 inches wide at the hilt which is in the middle section of the piece. This scarce iron piece is dark brown, and has some spotty light brown highlights. This piece was also hand forged from iron, and is a "four-part construction" type piece. This piece is made up with a "V-shaped blade", a "decorative curved hilt", a "handle bar", and a "pommel end bar" that has a single rivet that holds it onto the "handle bar". This rivet is made from a section of the "handle bar" that fitted through the "pommel end bar", and was hammered down over the "pommel end bar" which holds it in place. The "decorative curved hilt" is identical on each side of the piece, and it gives a very esoteric look to the piece as well. The overall construction is very solid, and this piece is a very durable weapon. The "V-shaped blade" also has hammered "blood lines" down the center, and this strengthened the "V-shaped blade" and allowed for a tight fit in a scabbard. There is also a grooved "slot" seen on one side of the "handle bar", and this likely held a wooden or bone handle into place that was fitted over the "handle bar". The condition of this piece is superb to mint quality, and is one of the best recorded iron examples of this type of weapon. The surface has some minor pitting from hammering and wear, and the piece was conditioned by a major museum in Germany. This piece has no repair/restoration, and there is some minute fill at the extreme tip end, which has also prevented the tip from breaking off. This piece is of the type that has been found in ancient Thrace, and the region around the Black Sea. Overall, an exceptional large example with excellent preservation and metal quality. This piece also sits on a custom metal display stand. Another analogous example was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, 2017, No. HM1102. (This Royal Athena Galleries piece is nearly the same length as the piece offered here, 11.25 inches long, and has some wear and losses. The Royal Athena piece is also offered at $7500.00. See attached photo.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1363783
Apolonia Ancient Art
$365.00
This superb Greek bronze coin is an (AE 17) that is from the city of Mesembria, and dates circa 4th-3rd century B.C. This coin is approximately 17mm in diameter, weighs 5.8 grams, and is in superb condition (EF+/EF+). This coin also has a beautiful dark green patina, perfect centering, excellent metal, and high relief. The obverse (Obv.) of this coin has an excellent image of a Greek "Attic type" helmet, which was the favorite helmet type of elite cavalry units forged by Alexander the Great. This coin also has perfect centering, and the full crest of the helmet is seen on the flan, which is not often completely seen relative to this coin type. The reverse (Rev.) features an Celtic war shield, and has Greek lettering above and below, which also names the city Mesembria. This lettering is also complete, as this coin has perfect centering, and is not often seen on this coin type. The city of Mesembria was a Greek colony in Thrace on the Black Sea coast, and traded in slaves, and agricultural products. This coin is an exceptional example, is one of the better recorded examples with perfect centering, and has details not often seen both on the obverse and reverse. References: SNG BM 276. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this coin is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1299352
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This beautiful x-large Greek Apulian ceramic is a knob-handled patera plate that dates circa 340-330 B.C. This extremely large piece is approximately 18.2 inches wide from handle to handle, by 6.5 inches high, and is attributed to the Ganymede Painter. This piece is also larger than most examples of this type, and is a superb intact example that is 100% original. The overall condition of this piece is superb to mint quality, save for some minor glaze checkering on the inside surface, and some minor and minute stress cracks which are all normal for an ancient Greek ceramic of this size. This piece also has some minute root marking seen mostly on the bottom base stem, and attractive heavy spotty white calcite deposits that are seen on various sections of the vessel. This piece has not been over-cleaned, and is in it's natural "as found" condition, which is scarce for a vessel of this size; and in addition, what is also not often seen is that this piece also has very vibrant black, dark orange, yellow, and white colors. This piece has two decorative black raised handles attached on each side of the raised flat rim, and in addition, there are four raised knobs attached to the flat rim which are seen on each side of each handle. There is an additional knob seen in the top middle of each handle as well. These knobs are also very decorative, and may have served in antiquity as an additional hand grip on the vessel, as this type of vessel was typically used to pour libations. The center of this beautiful plate has a draped seated woman seen seated on a rock, and is holding a plate and floral garland. She is facing a standing nude youth that is seen showing an open box, and is holding a wreath in his right hand. The drapery seen on her body is very detailed and translucent, which lends this figure an erotic look. The entire scene is also balanced with each figure holding an object away from the center of the scene, and in this case, the standing nude youth is seen holding a wreath, and the draped seated woman is holding a garland which balance the scene of the overall composition. Both figures are seen on a "dot-and-egg" pattern band that is seen below a minute "dotted" ground line, and the entire scene is seen within a sacred white olive-leaf wreath that frames the entire scene. The underside of this beautiful plate has a black reserve, with a raised footed base. The Ganymede painter was one of the best accomplished Greek Apulian artists during the second half of the 4th century B.C., and according to A.D. Trendall in "Red Figure Vases of South Italy and Sicily", Thames and Hudson, London, 1989, p. 96: "His drawing is more fluid and his youths have a softer look. He is fond of figures holding fans, open boxes and cistae, divided by two diagonal lines." The piece offered here is a fine example of the Ganymede Painter, and knob-handled patera by this painter are scarce to rare. This piece has a very high degree of eye appeal and is scarce to rare on the market, due to it's condition, esoteric design, and that it has been attributed to the Ganymede Painter, which is rarer than the scarce examples by the Darius-Underworld and the White Sakkos Painters. (A recent example was sold by Christie's Antiquities, London, April 2014, for 9373.00 Pounds/$15,591.00 USD realized. Attributed to the Darius-Underworld Painter, circa 330 B.C., 14.75 inches diameter, 8,000.00-12,000.00 Pounds estimates.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1288894
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This attractive piece is a Greek silver straining spoon that dates circa 3rd century B.C.-1st century A.D. This rare piece is approximately 4.9 inches long, by .9 inches in diameter at the bowl. This piece was hand beaten into shape, and the bowl was formed over a mold and attached to the shaft. There are five holes seen in the base of the bowl, and this piece likely served as a rare spice strainer at the table of a wealthy individual. There is also a curled hoop at the end, and this likely was hung in an ancient kitchen/household. This piece may also have served in a commercial capacity, and may also have been used to measure out a valuable "powder" type commodity. This specialized silver piece is seldom seen on the market, as it has fine construction and is seldom found as an individual type find. This piece also is somewhat analogous to the late Hellenistic silver spoon that is known as a "cochleare", as this type of piece also has a small rounded bowl which is attached to a shaft with a pointed terminal end. This type of "cochleare" spoon does not have any holes in the bottom of the bowl, and is thought to have been used for eating eggs and shellfish. For the "cochleare" type see: "Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate" by D.E. Strong, Methuen & CO., Ltd., 1966, p. 155. The complete piece offered here also has an attractive dark gray patina, and is intact with no repair/restoration. This dainty little piece is an exceptional example of Greek silver plate, and is seldom seen on the market. This piece hangs on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1315566
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This powerful looking piece is a Greek applique of Zeus, and dates to the Classical Period, circa late 5th century B.C. This piece is approximately 2.5 inches high, by 2.25 inches wide, by 1.1 inches in relief. This piece is also complete, and has no repair/restoration. This piece has an even dark gray patina, along with some spotty light brown iron oxide and dark green cuprite deposits. This piece was an applique likely for a large vessel such as a hydria, or possibly a volute krater, and likely fit on the main body of the vessel below a handle attachment. This piece was cast in a mold, and has great facial detail with individual beard and hair curls. There is also a laurel-leaf diadem seen in the hair, and this is an attribute of the Greek god Zeus. This piece is a scarce example, and is made from a lead-alloy metal which is occasionally seen in vessel additions of this type. This piece was made with a great deal of skill, as this piece has a great deal of detail. The fine facial detail as seen on this piece is also accented by the extremely high relief of the piece. This high degree of detail is also not normally seen on the more common analogous bronze examples of this type of piece. This piece is an exceptional "Classical Period" applique, and was part of a larger work that was of exceptional artistic style and workmanship. This piece is also set on a custom Plexiglas display stand, and can easily be removed by sliding it up from the two support pins. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1333281
Apolonia Ancient Art
$18,500.00
These seven extremely rare Graeco-Thracian silver phalerae date to the Hellenistic Period, circa 2nd-1st century B.C., and are approximately 4.3 inches in diameter for the larger phalera, and 2.25 inches in diameter for the other six phalerae. All seven phalerae are hand beaten from silver, and all have various degrees of gold gilt over the front surfaces. The largest phalera resembles a small bowl, and was hand beaten over a mold which formed the design seen in the center of the piece. This central design element resembles a "swastika", and perhaps this is the symbol this piece was meant to portray, but more likely, this symbol may also be a depiction of a "pinwheel" that spun in the wind. This "pinwheel" has a central dot or pin that supports the "four flaring bands" that are seen attached at the center. This "pinwheel" symbol was known to the ancient Greeks as a "strovilos" symbol, meaning "whirlwind", and is also a prominent symbol seen primarily on ancient bronze coins, and extremely rare silver coins that date circa 185-168 B.C. These coins are attributed to the Macedonian rulers Philip V and Perseus, and depict a Macedonian shield on the obverse with the "pinwheel" symbol seen at the center. (For the coin types see "SNG Ashmolean Museum Oxford, Vol. V, Part III, Macedonia", 1976, Nos. 3282-3288. Nos. 3282-3283 depict the "four flaring band" symbol, and nos. 3284-3288 depict the "six flaring band" symbol. See attached photo.) The silver phalerae offered here may have attached to a shield as portrayed in the coins noted above, or may have been attached to a leather type cuirass. The six nearly identical smaller phalerae would suggest this, as they all have two attachment pins that are flattened on the front and back sides. The clearance for these attachment pins on the backside suggests that these pieces were attached to a leather liner for a cuirass, rather than inserted into a shield that perhaps had a wooden core, but it is also quite possible that that these six phalerae were attached to a thin bronze cover of a shield that had a wooden core. The larger phalera with the "pinwheel" symbol has four attachment holes, two seen at the top and bottom, and this would allow for easy attachment to a shield with a wooden core. This piece may have also served as the central roundel of a chest cuirass as well. Whatever the case, these extremely rare pieces definitely had a military application, and are seldom seen on the market, as these pieces were made for a wealthy warrior of high status. The smaller phalerae support this theory, as they are very detailed and were hand beaten into shape. They are also individually detailed with multiple minute punch marks that defined the outer sculpted design. Within this outer sculpted design is a symbol at the center that is comprised with what looks to be a "cluster" of animal heads facing outwards. Each one of the heads have a snout, eyes, and two ears which are shared with each of the other individual heads. The overall rounded "cluster" design also resembles a flower as seen from above, and this design may have had multiple meanings and representations. The designs seen on all of the phalerae are also extremely rare relative to ancient Greek art, and may have been a unique symbol that perhaps distinguished the warrior who wore these phalerae. All of these pieces have dark brown/black deposits in various degrees seen over the silver and gold gilt, and the silver with little gold gilt and deposits also has a beautiful blue black patina. All of these pieces are intact, with two of the smaller phalerae having some stress cracks, and overall, these pieces are in exceptional condition. For the type see, "Thracian Art Treasures", by Ivan Venedikov and Todor Gerassimov, Caxton Pub., London, 1975, nos. 351-353. These pieces are also attached to a custom Plexiglas display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private Krefield, Germany collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1169806
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,265.00
This large piece is a "Veracruz" culture standing priest, Remojadas type, that dates from the Classic period, circa 450-650 A.D. This piece is approximately 22.5 inches high, and easily stands by itself on a custom wooden stand. This piece is of an artistic style, known as "Remojadas", which is the name of a particular archaeological site, although objects in closely related styles actually come from a number of different sites in Veracruz. The name "Remojadas" thus refers to objects from south-central Veracruz, generally from the Classic-period. This piece is also known as a "Xipe-Toltec" type priest, as he portrays the god in costume. The "Xipe-Toltec" cult flourished along the Gulf Coast of modern day Mexico during the Classic and early Postclassic periods before gaining a prominent place in the Aztec pantheon, probably as a result of the subsequent Aztec domination of the Gulf Coast in the mid-15th century. Most Xipe figures vividly depict a human inside a flayed skin of another man, and this god was known as "Our Lord the Flayed One". According to Charles Phillips in "Aztec and Maya", Lorenz Pub., London, 2007, p. 62: "Victims killed in honour of Xipe Totec, the god of planting and vegetation, were shot with arrows so that their blood flowed into the earth like life-giving waters. Indeed, the Aztecs called human blood "chalchiuatl" (precious water). The corpse was then flayed and a priest would wear the skin in honour of the god. The rite was a celebration of the splitting of seeds that makes possible the growth of new vegetation each spring." Mary Miller and Karl Taube in "Ancient Mexico and the Maya", Thames and Hudson Pub., London, 1993, p. 188 also add: "At the time of the Conquest the Xipe festival fell during the spring, in our month of March, and much of its imagery suggests agricultural renewal: as a seed germinates, it feeds off the rotting hull around it, finally letting the new shoot emerge. The Xipe impersonators wore the old skins until they were rotten, when the young man once again emerged." The Xipe-Toltec piece offered here displays a priest wearing the flayed skin of a sacrificial victim, as seen with the rolled skin folds seen hanging below the neck, the skin leggings, the skin bundles tied at the back shoulder and the right hip, and the human skin mask. There are black-bitumen painted highlights seen on the headband with medallions, earplugs, lips, and eyes. There are also black-bitumen painted extruded eyeballs that are seen hanging from the eye openings, and the black lips accentuate an open mouth that shows this dramatic figurine chanting in a ritual posture. This expressive figure is also holding a floral designed fan with petals, which may represent the Xipe ritual of regeneration. This piece is made from a light gray terracotta, and has light tan mineral deposits. This complete piece was repaired from several large fragments, which is usually the case for large-scale Veracruz pieces such as this, and this piece is a better example than what is usually seen. The floral fan is an attribute that is seldom seen as well, and this is a principle reason why this large example is a scarce to rare type. The floral fan also indicates that the individual depicted is likely in the act of performing the "Xipe-Toltec" regeneration ceremony, along with the fact that this priest is seen with an open mouth who appears to be chanting in the act of the regeneration ceremony which ensured the planting and growth of the new years crops. The majority of these figurines are seen simply standing in an upright position, and are not seen holding any implements of any sort, but more importantly, the majority of these Veracruz "Xipe-Toltec" figurines do not display a dramatic facial expression such as this example. (Another Veracruz "Remojadas" example of this type and of the same size is offered in Bonhams African, Oceanic & Pre-Columbian Art, New York, Nov. 2012, no. 3. $8,000.00-$12,000.00 estimates, $10,000.00 realized.) For the type offered here see: "Ancient Art of Veracruz", Ethnic Arts Council of Los Angeles, 1971, no. 31. The piece offered here is definitely ceremonial in nature, and easily conveys this fact to the viewer, which is not often the case relative to figurines of this type. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Bonhams Art & Artifacts of the Americas auction, San Francisco, Sept. 2012, no. 1039. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1276518
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This piece is a scarce Greek Mycenaean bronze double-ax head that dates circa 1400-1200 B.C. This piece is approximately 6.3 inches long, by 2.25 inches high near the end of each blade. This piece is very solid, as it was cast as one piece, and because of it's heavy weight, it was well served as a heavy battle ax. This piece also had added strength, as the inner shank design is "V" shaped, and is not a round circle as most examples of this type have. This "V" designed inner shank provided for added strength relative to it's attachment to the shaft, and this design made this a powerful weapon, as this design gave added leverage to the warrior while striking a blow. This design also points to the fact that this piece was likely made for battle, rather than being made purely as a votive object after the death of the warrior. However, there is a strong possibility that this piece not only may have served in battle, but it was also used as a votive offering as well. This weapon was the principle weapon of the Mycenaean Greeks and was probably used during the Trojan War. This type of bronze weapon is also scarce to rare, because bronze during this period was very valuable, and bronze objects that were damaged and/or had lost their utility were often melted down into another bronze weapon or object. The shape of this heavy battle ax may have originated in Crete with the Minoan culture, circa 2000 B.C., as double-ax head weapons and plaques have been excavated at Knossos. This shape may also refer to the Minoan bull-jumping cult, as the ends of the double-ax may have represented the horns of the bull. A number of votive gold double-axes, found in Arkalochori in Crete, are of the same shape as the example offered here. This piece has a beautiful dark green/blue patina with some heavy dark green/brown mineral deposits, and is in mint to superb "as found" condition with no breaks. This piece also has a relatively sharp blade edge, and there is little or no wear over the entire piece. For the type see "Greek, Etruscan, and Roman Bronzes in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston", by M. Comstock and C. Vermeule III, 1971, no. 1630. The example offered here is very analogous to the example sold in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2002, no. 18. ($5,000.00-$8,000.00 estimates, $5,975.00 realized. See attached photo.) Another example was offered by Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, for $7500.00. (See the exhibit catalog "Venerable Traditions", published Nov. 2007, no. 26. See attached photo.) Another example was also offered by Charles Ede Ltd., London, published in Greek Antiquities, 2006, no. 37. (4,000.00 Pound estimate.) The attractive piece offered here sits on a custom display stand, and can easily lift off. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, circa 2000-2014. Inv.# P33-039-101514c. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1356955
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This interesting piece is an Etruscan red-figure stemmed plate that dates circa 4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 5.45 inches in diameter, by 2.4 inches high. This piece has been classified as being from the "Genucilia Group", and the group name derives from an example that had the Etruscan name "P. Genucilia" inscribed under its stemmed foot. This piece also has been described as a "star plate", as noted by Prof. Mario Del Chiaro in "Etruscan Red-Figure Vase Painting at Caere", University of California, 1974. The "five pointed wave pattern" seen on the top side of this piece also resembles a "star burst". The "wave pattern" seen on these vessels are also known to have only five of these "points" as well, and why there is generally a "five pointed wave pattern" seen on these vessels is unknown. The "five pointed wave pattern" seen on this piece frames a young goddess facing left that is seen wearing long earrings and a sakkos over her hair. The sakkos has "X patterns" within, and the entire composition is done with a dark black polychrome over a light tan terracotta. This intact piece has a raised stemmed base, and has some spotty white calcite and mineral deposits seen in the low relief sections of the vessel. The bottom of the vessel has several old collection numbers seen including: "P401", "1026", and "Lot 60, Gray Coll., Sotheby's, June 88". This piece also has two "X" graffiti marks seen on the top side inscribed over the face of the young goddess. This piece was also used as an offering plate in sanctuaries, and the "X" pattern graffiti, along with the "X" patterns seen within the sakkos design, may also indicate the workshop where this piece was made and/or the artist who produced this piece. The overall design of this piece makes this a very interesting ancient ceramic, and is rare in this intact condition with vibrant painted images. (Another analogous example was offered in Christie's Antiquities, London, April 2011, no. 233. 800.00-1,200.00 Pounds estimates, 2125 Pounds realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Private English collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, London, June 1988. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #579338
Apolonia Ancient Art
$5,685.00
This x-large Roman glass jug dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 7.3 inches high by 5.7 inches in diameter. This beautiful piece is also in mint condition, with no stress cracks and/or chips. This pleasing light green vessel has beautiful multi-colored iridescence and nice minute root marking. There are also five decorative wheel-cut (lathe) bands that run around the main body of the piece, and these bands may also have served as a measurement indicator of the level of the contained liquid. This was likely the case, as the five cut bands are evenly spaced on the vessel. There is also a thick strap handle that was applied to the upper shoulder and below the lip. The lip of this attractive vessel was also turned out and down, which formed a rounded edge. (For an analogous example, see Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2001, no.213. This vessel is approximately 9.25 inches high, and has eleven decorative wheel-cut bands, three of which are deeply cut. $20,000.00-$30,000.00 estimates, and realized $23,500.00. Another recent comparable sold at Cristie's Antiquities, London, April 2010, no. 98, for 5625 Pounds, approximately $7600.00, and had 5,700-7,900 pounds estimates. This vessel is approximately 6.5 inches high and is a light green color with six decorative wheel-cut bands. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is an exceptional large example of early Roman blown glass, is very analogous to the two examples noted above, and is scarce in this mint quality condition. Ex: Private English collection. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1340042
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,685.00
This complete piece is a Greek silver neck section for a vessel, and dates circa 5th-4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 4 inches diameter, by 2.8 inches high. This piece is slightly oval in shape, and has slightly sloping sides. This piece has exceptional workmanship, and was hammered into shape from one solid sheet of silver. In addition, this piece has an extremely detailed beaded lip border, with minute beading which only a skilled artist could have produced. This piece was made as a section for a large silver vessel such as a hydria, or a stamnos, and both of these vessel types had an extended neck that reached upwards from the main body of the vessel, along with handles that were attached to the main body of the vessel. This pieced may also have been produced for fitting into a ceramic vessel body, and although this is rare, it is a known type of use. This piece likely was never used, and could have been made as a votive type use, and was never intended for use in real life. This piece also could have been produced for use into a silver vessel at a later time, as was perhaps lost in the production process, or became war booty that was hoarded away. Whatever the case, this piece is a rare example as a section such as this, and is an excellent case study as to how a complete silver vessel could have been produced. This piece also appears to be a complete neck section, with no apparent cut marks showing in the lower edge, although there is some lower edge roughness that is to be expected. This piece also has an attractive dark to light gray patina, and there are some sections that have spotty dark to light black mineral deposits, along with some additional minute mineralization and root marking. This type of piece is seldom seen on the market, and is an exceptional example for the type. This piece also sits on a custom metal and Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Private New Jersey collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: