Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1372975
Apolonia Ancient Art
$825.00
This dainty and mint conditioned Greek Attic kylix dates circa 4th century B.C., and is approximately 1.75 inches high, by 6.6 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece has a lustrous black blaze and is seen on the outer and inner surfaces of the piece, save for the bottom of the vessel that has an unglazed section. This unglazed reserved section also has a "circle-and-dot" design element seen on the bottom center of the vessel. The shoulder of the piece is slightly offset, and is a well made example. This piece is also in flawless condition, with no repair/restoration, and has a great deal of muti-colored iridescence patina. There is also some spotty and minute white calcite deposits. A flawless Greek Attic vessel with nice eye appeal. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1170376
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This superb little piece is an Attic stemless kylix ceramic that dates circa 480-470 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.25 inches wide from handle to handle, and is approximately 2.1 inches high. This piece is also intact, is superb to mint quality, and has a multi-colored patina over an even deep black glaze. This multi-colored patina also compares with the finest examples that are normally seen for an Attic black glazed vessel of this type. This nice Greek Attic ceramic also has a nice brilliant deep black glaze on the inside of the bowl. There is an inconspicuous area, centered just below where one of the handles is attached to the main body of the vessel, and this is where an incised double "lambda" Greek letter symbol is seen. The ancient Greek "lambda" letter subsequently developed into letters in other alphabets including the Latin "L". These small letters and/or symbols are approximately .18 and.2 inches high, and may have been added to this piece to denote the owner, and/or perhaps how this piece was used in trade. In addition, these marks could have been used as a price notation and/or as a mark to denote a master vase of a group production. According to John Boardman in "The History of Greek Vases", Thames and Hudson Pub., London 2001, p. 154: "It seems to have been in the potter's yard that marks were made on the pots to identify their eventual carrier." In addition, Boardman states: "Most of these merchant marks are seen on vases of around 570 to 450 B.C., the period of busiest Athenian export..". A.W. Johnson in "Trademarks on Greek Vases", Aris & Philips Ltd., Wiltshire, U.K., 1979, pp. 5-6, states that: "A number of the marks are relatively inconspicuous, including those on the handle and some on the shoulder in the vicinity of the handle.....and there can be little doubt that these are trademarks." Types 2F and 6F, seen in the above reference, is also a close match seen on the vessel offered here. According to Johnson on pp. 4-7, Johnson states that the overall number of incised marks seen on these vessels is paltry, compared to those vessels with marks that are seen under foot. He also adds that these incised marks may also represent "batch" production marks, and that one vessel was marked to indicate the entire group of vessels that were possibly produced for export. It is also interesting to note that one of the "lambda" letters/symbols is slightly smaller than the other letter/symbol, and may represent a tally mark for a "batch" of vessels. This interesting piece also has an offset lip, as seen with the line that runs around the bowl, and is classified as being part of the Attic "Inset Lip Class, circa 480-470 B.C.". For the discussion of the type as a whole see: "The Athenian Agora, Vol. 12", by B. Sparkes and L. Talcott, Princeton University, 1970. This superb to mint piece has some minute white calcite deposits, seen mostly on the bottom of the vessel, and a light red band seen above and below the bottom base ring. This interesting piece is scarce to rare, especially in this intact condition, and is a superb example with rare trade symbols that are not often seen on vessels of this type. Ex: Private Swiss collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1304461
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This group of Greco-Roman ceramics date circa 4th century B.C.-1st century A.D. All of these pieces are intact, and have no restoration/repair. This group are mainly household type wares, and this group has: (1) Greek blackware skyphos, approximately 7 inches wide from handle to handle, by 2 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (1) Greek Apulian dish, approximately 4.2 inches in diameter, by 1.5 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (2) Greek Apulian blackware lekythos, approximately 3.2 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (1) Greek aryballos brown/black bottle, approximately 3.4 inches high, circa 3rd-2nd century B.C. (1) Greek footed red ware olpe, approximately 3.5 inches high, circa 4th-3rd century B.C. (1) Roman red terracotta oil lamp, circa 1st century A.D. This group is a nice collection with a wide variety of types and shapes. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1990's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1323767
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This extremely fine coin is a silver drachm that was minted shortly after the death of Alexander the Great circa 323 B.C. This coin was likely minted circa 323-310 B.C. in Colophon, or possibly Abydus, and the identifying mint mark is the Macedonian royal star burst symbol that is seen on the reverse, at the front of the seated Zeus. This coin is in extremely fine condition (EF/EF-), and is approximately 20mm in diameter, weighs 4.3 gms (Attic Weight Standard), and has a very light gray patina. The obverse features a bust of Herakles facing right, and is seen wearing a lion's skin headdress. The portrait seen here is also a very close likeness of Alexander the Great, and was likely intended to portray both Herakles and Alexander. The reverse features a seated Zeus, who is seen holding a standing eagle which was a messenger of the gods. The Macedonian star burst symbol is seen at the front of the seated Zeus, and the name (Philip) in Greek lettering is seen behind. The flan of this attractive piece is very large, and one can see the edge line of the die that runs around the outer edge of the obverse. The flan of this piece is larger than what one normally sees relative to this issue, and this coin also has perfect centering, along with extremely high relief on the obverse. The large flan size alone makes this coin a superb example, and is not often seen on the market. In addition, the seated Zeus does not have crossed legs and has an analogous design as the specimens attributed to Abydus show, and the Macedonian royal star is often seen on examples attributed to Colophon, according to Martin Price. References: This extremely rare coin has an example listed in Price, no. P113, and is listed as "minted circa 323-280 B.C.", and as "Uncertain of Western Asia Minor". It may also be that this rare issue may have been minted in Pergamon, shortly after the death of Alexander the Great, as this was the center of the so-called "Royalist" faction that supported the royal family after the death of Alexander. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1327997
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This rare standing bronze bull is complete, and dates to the Geometric Period, circa 750-700 B.C. This piece is approximately 3.5 inches long, by 2.25 inches high. This piece is also somewhat heavy, as it is solid, and was cast as one piece. This rare Greek bronze is of the type that have been found at sacred shrines such as Delphi, Olympia, and Samos. This piece was also likely votive in nature, and this is why this type of piece has been found at these sacred Greek sites. (For an analogous example found at Olympia, see: H.V. Herrmann, "Die Kessel der Orientalalisierrnden Zeit, Teil 1, OlympForsch VI", 1966, no. 114.) This piece has round almond shaped eyes, a tail designed between the legs, and a thick neck which are all features that are seen in ancient Greek art during the early Geometric Period, circa 8th century B.C. This period is also known as the "Orientalizing" period of Greek art, as there was also extensive trade between Greece and the Levant (eastern Mediterranean), and this is also why this type of piece has been found throughout the ancient Greek, and Near eastern regions such as Anatolia. This complete piece also has a dark brown and green patina, with red highlights. This piece is also intact, has no repair/restoration, and is in superb condition. The piece offered here also appears to be pulling back with the weight of it's body, as a domesticated animal would tend to do, and this would also explain the "cropped horn" design of this piece. This type of solid cast votive bull is scarce to rare, and is not often seen on the market. Ex: Leo Mildenberg collection, Zurich, Switzerland, circa 1970's. Ex: Christie's Antiquities, London, Oct. 2004, no. 372. Published: "More Animals in Ancient Art from the Leo Mildenberg Collection". by A.P. Kozloff and D.G. Mitten, Part III, Mainz am Rhein Pub., 1986, no. 17. (See attached photo.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This unique piece is a stamped plaque that is made from lead. This piece is Italic, and dates circa mid 16th to the late 17th century A.D. This interesting piece is approximately 2.7 inches wide, by 2.1 inches high, and by .15 inches thick. The shape of this piece is oval, and as such, was likely an inlay for a furniture piece or a box, rather than part of a large pendant for a necklace and/or pectoral. The backside of this piece is flat, and this piece was made in the same fashion as a Roman bronze sestertius or Renaissance medallion coin would have been made, with a carved die that was hand struck into the prepared heated lead flan. This method of manufacture allowed one to make several examples of this piece, however, the piece offered here may be the only recorded example, as our research has not found any other pieces. In fact, all of these lead plaques are very rare, as lead is very soft and is easy to damage, melts very easily, and can simply be easily used later on to make other objects. The piece offered here has a light brown patina with a thin oxidized crust over the outer surface, moreover, the condition of this piece is superb with no major tears, dents, or scraps as lead is a very soft material. There are also micro black dendrites which indicate that this piece has been buried for quite some time. There is a small hole seen at the top which may have held an attachment pin. This piece shows a seated, virile figure that is seen half draped, and is seen holding a round object in his extended right hand which may be an apple. This seated figure appears to be examining and looking at the round object that he is seen holding up in front of himself, and there is a strong possibility that the figure is the Trojan prince Paris, who is contemplating as to whom he should award the prize. According to Greek myth, it was Paris who was chosen by the gods to decide which of the three goddesses - Juno, Minerva, or Venus - was the fairest, and the prize was an apple. Venus won the prize who in turn awarded Paris the mortal Helen, and this triggered the Trojan War. The Trojan prince Aeneas, subsequently fled the ruins of Troy to found the city of Rome, as praised by the Roman poet Virgil, who prophesied a "new golden age" as founded by Augustus, the first or Roman emperors. Virgil, Horace, and Propertius, who are considered the greatest writers in Roman literature, all embraced Augustus' propaganda campaign in creating the "myth of Augustus", which fostered the idea that Augustus was the one chosen by the gods to preside over the new empire. This literary propaganda campaign legitimized Augustus' hold on power after the bloody civil wars, and in the same context, there are several Roman works of art that served the same purpose. The piece offered here points back to the founding of Rome, and another rare Roman work of art that is considered by many academics to fit into this category is the Portland Vase, and the seated figure seen on the Portland Vase known as "Figure E" is thought to be Paris as well. The artistic style of "Figure E" is also very analogous to the seated figure seen on the piece offered here, as both are seated, both are nude except for drapery that falls over the thighs, both have a virile muscular build, and both have the same type of hair style. (See "Glass of the Caesars" by Donald Harden, The British Museum Pub., London, 1987, p. 59.) The piece offered here was also examined by Dr. Wolfgang Fischer-Bossert of the German Archaeological Institute in Berlin, who dated this piece, and in addition, he thought there was a strong possibility that the maker of this piece saw the Portland Vase. The seated figure seen on the piece offered here is seen centered in front of a fountain with a lion's head spout. There are also architectural elements seen at the back of the seated figure, including a building with a round dome that may be a representation of the Pantheon. The overall scene may be one set in the Campus Martius (Field of Mars), and is the location where Augustus was cremated and where his Mausoleum was built. The piece offered here is an important work of Italic Renaissance art, according to Dr. Fischer-Bossert, but this piece is obviously in need of further academic study. A custom stand is included. Ex: Private English collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1338092
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This rare to extremely rare piece is a Greek Apulian-Gnathia alabastron that dates circa 350-330 B.C., and is approximately 7.6 inches high. This type of vessel is also referred to as an aryballos, but due to its cylindrical shape, it is classified as an alabastron. This piece is extremely rare as it follows the slightly earlier Greek Apulian types in form, but it also combines the extremely rich floral decorations that are seen on the subsequent Greek Gnathian type ceramics. This piece is therefore classified as an Apulian-Gnathian type of ceramic, and the high degree of art and form for this culture makes it an extremely rare to rare example. This piece has a beautiful and detailed young woman, likely Persephone, that is seen emerging from the floral elements that are seen rinsing up from the ground. For the ancient Greeks, Persephone represented the change of seasons and eternal life, as she returned from the underworld every spring to regenerate the earth. The detail of Persephone, and the floral elements seen to the right and left of the bust seen on this vessel are exquisite. This piece may also be attributed to the "Toledo Painter", who was one of the more accomplished painters for the period who utilized extensive floral elements and detailed faces as seen on this beautiful piece. This piece also has a flat designed opening, which also was an aid in controlling the flow of precious oil. This piece has a lustrous black glaze, and vibrant white, yellow, and light brown colors. The vibrant white color of the bust of Persephone also pops out from the black background, and can easily be seen from a great distance. This piece is also intact with no repair and/or restoration, and is in mint condition. There are some spotty light white calcite deposits seen in various sections, and the black glaze is deep and even over the entire piece. This piece also easily stands by itself, and is a remarkable and beautiful example of an ancient Greek ceramic. (For the type see "The Art of South Italy: Vases from Magna Graecia by Margaret Mayo, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, 1982, nos. 55-56 and 128-129.) Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva, circa 1990's. Ex: Private Swiss collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1360626
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This extremely large Greek lead "sling-bullet" dates circa 5th-4th century B.C., and is approximately 2.25 inches long, by 1.35 inches wide, by .7 inches high. This piece is extremely large for the type, as most examples have an average size of approximately 1-1.4 inches long, by .7 inches wide. This massive scarce to rare piece was cast in a mold, is solid lead, and is a very heavy example. This weapon also has an almond shape, as most lead "sling-bullets" have, and this shape provided a stable aerodynamic flight, an easy extraction from a mold, and enabled this piece to more easily stay in the sling cradle without rolling out. This piece also has a lengthy inscription on one side, with seven to nine letters, and the other side has an image of a thunderbolt. The inscription may name a city, an individual, or it may convey an insult such as "take this". The inscription has not been translated, as some of the letters are not clear, and the inscription may also have abbreviations built into the one line of letters. This piece has a light gray patina with some spotty light brown mineral deposits, and is a complete example. This piece also has some dents and minor gouges, and some of these imperfections were likely a result from impacts from battle, as there is a thick patina seen over some of these imperfections. This piece is scarce to rare in this large size, and is a piece that best represents this type of ancient weapon. This interesting piece also sits on a custom display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1304240
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This nice piece is a Roman bronze "crossbow type" fibula that dates circa early 4th century A.D. This piece is approximately 3.6 inches long, by 2.25 inches wide, and is in mint to superb condition. This complete and intact piece has a main body that was cast as one piece, and there are three small decorative spheres were later added with pins. The single intact attachment pin was added to the horizontal arm, and engages in the straight section of the vertical section. This thin attachment pin still has some movement, and can move in and out of the vertical clasp, and up and down within the horizontal arm. The overall design of this attractive piece is in the form of a Latin Cross, and also represents Christ on the Cross. The "crossbow fibula" type was derived from the earlier Etruscan and Greek "bow type". The "crossbow type" fibula seen here was very common in the 4th and 5th century A.D., and is thought to have originated in the Danube region, from which it spread throughout the Roman Empire. The piece offered here is a male fibula, and was worn by soldiers, and by high ranking civil servants and officials. This piece was used primarily to fasten the cloak on the shoulder of the wearer. Many of these examples also had gold and silver gilt, and were inlaid with precious stones. The example offered here has no traces of gold and silver gilt, but it does have eight rounded holes seen in the flat section of the vertical arm, and these holes could have held mounted precious stones or glass. This piece also has a beautiful dark emerald green patina, and is an exceptional example for the type. This piece stands on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1243639
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This massive and extremely rare piece is a Greek iron sarissa spear head that dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 4th century B.C., and is approximately 22.5 inches long by 2 inches wide at the blades mid point. This piece is intact, and is in superb condition with a hardened earthen over glaze which has helped to preserve this extremely rare iron weapon. The metal seen on this piece is for the most part very compact with very little flaking, and is in very stable and solid condition. The condition of this piece is remarkable, given the fact that it is made from iron, and not bronze. This piece is all the more remarkable, in that it has survived intact after sustaining substantial battle damage. This battle damage can be seen with the two bends in the blade, and a small part of the end of the shank which was moved out from the blow to the piece. The blow to the piece traveled from the tip end to the shank, and did not shatter the weapon, as the blow appears to have been on the side of the blade, thus causing the two bends in the blade and the small section at the end of the shank to move out and expand. This piece was likely carried by an infrantryman, and was fitted to a wooded shaft about 12-15 feet long. This heavy lance was carried with two hands, and is known as a "sarissa". This type of weapon was also developed by Philip II, who was the father of Alexander the Great, and was king of Macedonia circa 359-336 B.C. His military genius transformed his army with many innovative weapons and battle tactics, and the weapon offered here was one such weapon. The finest weapons during the Hellenistic period were iron, rather than bronze, and were forged and hand beaten into shape. These iron weapons were extremely sharp and durable, and iron swords from this period could easily take off a mans arm at the shoulder, and penetrate bronze shields. The fact that the piece offered here did not shatter during battle proves that this piece was hammered again, and again, to give it strength and durability. (For the Hellenistic Greek weapon types see "Greece and Rome at War", by Peter Connolly, United Kingdom, 1998.) This piece is extremely rare and is seldom seen in this condition on today's market. This piece comes with a custom metal stand and stands upright. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1322070
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This flawless piece is a Greek red ware pyxis that dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 4th-early 3rd century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.85 inches in diameter at the lid and lower base, and 4 inches high. This piece is in flawless condition, and has no repair and/or restoration. Vessels of this type are scarce to rare in this mint condition, as the lid and base have thin edges that extend away from the main body of the piece. The lid fits very close to the supporting lower base, and lifts easily on and off the base. The lid also has a roundel seen at the top that may have had a bone, metal, or stone insert with a carved image. A nearly identical vessel of the same size with a terracotta image of a goddess, seen within the roundel at the top, was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, Vol. XXVI, no. 118. ($5,000.00 estimate. See attached photo.) The piece offered here also has some spotty light brown earthen, and minute black mineral deposits. A scarce vessel in this mint condition. Ex: Charles Ede collection, London, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1142779
Apolonia Ancient Art
$465.00
This esoteric piece is a Greek Thracian bronze ring that dates circa 4th-3rd century B.C. This piece is approximately ring size 7-7.5, and has an even dark green patina. This cast piece is in superb condition, and can easily be worn today, as the hoop and bezel is very solid. There is some smooth wear on the inside surface which also indicates that this ring was worn for some time. This ring type dates to the Hellenistic period, and the artistic style is very simplistic, as seen with the "line-designed" stylized animal seen on the front face of the ring. This stylized animal was engraved into the front face, and is seen within an engraved circle that is seen near the edge of the front face. There are also engraved lines seen on each outer edge of the ring as well. The stylized animal has four elongated legs, a raised tail, and two ears or possibly horns. This piece was likely worn by a young adult, and the image seems to convey a great deal of animation and movement. This ring is of exceptional quality, and is a scarce example. A custom ring display stand is included, along with a ring box. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: David Liebert collection, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1315451
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This large and impressive piece is a Greek bronze horse that dates to the Geometric Period, circa 8th century B.C. This exceptional and large example is approximately 3.4 inches high, by 3.65 inches long. This complete piece is in superb condition, with no cracks and/or breaks, and the overall surface is very even with a beautiful dark green patina. There is some dark green/brown mineral deposits seen mostly on the bottom side of the base plate, and overall, this piece has a great deal of eye appeal due to it's beautiful dark green patina and even surfaces. This esoteric piece is designed with an elongated tail and legs, which are attached to the base plate that has ten triangular openings. The triangular openings in the base plate arranged into two rows, along with the base plate extension to accommodate for the attachment of the tail, stylistically point to a "Laconian" manufacture. (See another analogous "Laconian" example in "Glories of the Past: Ancient Art from the Shelby White and Leon Levy Collection", Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1990, no. 72.) The piece offered here also has a tubular designed torso and elongated nose, and the elongated nose has two raised mounds seen just in front of the ears that represent the eyes of the horse. The type of horse seen here may be the "Laconian Type" for the reasons noted above, but there are also no knobs seen on the legs that represent knee joints, and this type of design is seen mostly on the "Thessalian Type". The type of Greek geometric bronze horse offered here, with the openwork integral plinths, were votive offerings in the Geometric Period, and are found widespread throughout the ancient Greek world. However, large examples in the superb condition offered here are quite rare, and not often have the beautiful deep emerald green patina that is seen on this exceptional example. (Another analogous example of the same size and condition was also offered in Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2012, no. 61., $40,000.00-$60,000.00 estimates, $50,000.00 realized. See attached photo.) This beautiful piece also sits on a custom display stand. A large example, with great surfaces and a beautiful dark green patina, which together make this exceptional piece one of the finest examples available on the market today. Ex: Private English collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #577270
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This exquisite Greek Attic blackware mug is in flawless condition and has a deep black lustrous glaze. This pieces dates circa 5th-4th century BC and is approximately 4.4 inches high by 3.5 inches in diameter at the rim. This piece has attractive minute white calcium deposits and root marking, and the outer and inner surfaces of this piece are exceptional. The deep black lustrous glaze, in combination with the other surface factors noted above, give this piece a high degree of eye appeal. The mint condition of this piece points to the fact that it may also have been solely a votive piece, and was never used in real life. This piece has a black circle/dot pattern symbol, which is seen centered on the base at the bottom. This symbol is a mark for an Athenian ceramic shop, and the esoteric curved shape of the body displays great skill in the potters hand. Ex: Gunter Puhze collection, Germany. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1038446
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This mint quality little stemless kylix is an Attic ceramic that dates circa 480-470 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.5 inches wide from handle to handle, and is approximately 2.25 inches high. This intact piece is nearly flawless, and has a nice brilliant deep black glaze, especially on the inside of the bowl. This piece also has an offset lip, as seen with the line that runs around the bowl, and is classified as being part of the "Inset Lip Class, circa 480-470 B.C". For the discussion of the type as a whole see: "The Athenian Agora, Vol.12", by B. Sparks and L. Talcott, Princeton University, 1970. This piece is scarce in this superb condition, is an exceptional example for the type, and is a beautiful little gem. Ex: Private Swiss collection. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1246498
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This appealing piece is a standing nude Roman bronze Jupiter that dates circa 1st-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 3.5 inches high, and stands on its belonging square plinth. This standing nude figurine is seen holding an eagle in his outstretched right hand, and is also seen in the act of throwing a lightning bolt with his raised left arm. Jupiter, also known to the ancient Greeks as Zeus, is also seen wearing a cloak draped over his neck and left shoulder. This piece has exceptional facial, hair, and body molding detail which lends this piece a great deal of eye appeal. In addition, this piece has a young, erotic body design which is a Greek convention of art, and this can be seen with the slender legs and semi-muscular designed body. This piece is complete, save for the missing eagle's head, left hand, and probable lightning bolt which may have been in the left hand. This piece has a beautiful even dark to light green glossy patina, and the exceptional glossy patina seen on this Roman bronze figurine is scarce for figurines of this type. The footed bronze plinth also has additional bronze inside, and the bronze plinth is nearly solid, which added extra weight at the bottom of the piece. This extra weight allows this piece to solidly stand in an upright position. This piece was also cast from the top up, and the figurine and bronze plinth were cast as one piece. The bearded Jupiter is seen looking away to his right, and his weight is seen on his right leg in the act of throwing his lightning bolt. An analogous example can be seen in "Master Bronzes from the Classical World" by Mitten and Doeringer, New York, 1967, no. 266. (See attached photo.) A custom black and clear Plexiglas stand is included, and this piece simply sits on the stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1325568
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This powerful ancient coin was minted in ancient Lydia, and is attributed to the king of Lydia, Kroisos, circa 561-546 B.C. This silver coin is known as a Siglos, which is a half-stater, and weighs 5.3 gms. This coin was also minted on the so-called "heavy standard", and this coin type is also found in electrum and gold. This coin is in about Extremely Fine condition (EF-/EF-), has good centering, is approximately 17mm wide, and has a nice light gray patina. This coin features a powerful imagae on the obverse, which is the forepart of a lion bearing his teeth with an open mouth, and is facing the forepart of a horned bull. The reverse features a two part incuse square punch. King Kroisos was also the first to abandon electrum coinage in favor of a bimetallic currency based on pure gold and silver. The coin offered here represents this shift in the minting of ancient Greek coinage, and likely was minted 50-75 years after the invention of coinage. A nice example for the type. References: SNG Tubingen 3656; SNG van Aulock 2876. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #943121
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865.00
This piece is an exceptionally large carved marble seal that is approximately 2 inches in diameter by .75 inches high. This piece dates circa 4th Millennium B.C., and is flat on one side with an oval shape on the other. The flat side displays a running ibex that is seen facing right, and there is a crescent moon and a single dot solar symbol that is is seen above. There is also a bow drilled hole that is seen running through the center, and this piece was probably attached to a cord that was worn over the neck of the individual that owned this piece. This piece likely served as an individual seal for the owner, and may have been used as a mark of value. The design was also bow drilled, as there are individual bow-drilled circles that constitute the overall design that is seen on the flat face of this scarce piece. This piece is analogous to an example seen in Bonhams Antiquities, London, May 2008, no. 348. This type of design is also analogous to several cultures that were found in the ancient Near East during this early period, and this type of design is often seen in Anatolia/North Syria, and is often found on hardstone seals made from black steatite. The marble that this piece is made from, was likely imported into the region, and it is a scarce material for a seal this large. This piece has a nice light grey patina and there are spotty white and light brown calcite deposits. There are also some concentrated straight marks on the oval side, and this piece may also have served as a wet stone for a blade during a later period in antiquity. A nice rare seal not often seen on the market. Ex: Erlenmeyer Collection, Basel, Switzerland. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, London, June 1997, no. 1. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: