Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #583883
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This mint quality Roman glass bottle dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 6.3 inches high by 5.3 inches in diameter. This mint quality piece has an extended flat and thin upper rim which is intact, and as such, is a rare example for the type, as most Roman glass vessels of this type have a cracked and/or broken upper rim. This attractive vessel also has an exceptional multi-colored patina, and is much better than most examples of this type, as the patina is very thick in sections. This vessel is also a light blue-green color, and has light brown and white calcite deposits that are seen both on the inside and outside surfaces. (For an analogous example, see "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum" no. 146, p.58.) The exceptional piece offered here is seldom seen on the market in this mint quality, and has a great deal of eye appeal. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Wood : Pre AD 1000 item #969122
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,875.00
This piece is an exceptional Egyptian wooden female figurine that was likely part of an offering model, and this piece dates circa 12th Dynasty, 1991-1786 B.C. This large piece is approximately 12.1 inches high, and on its custom stand, it is approximately 15.75 inches high. This piece is also larger than most examples of this type, as complete examples average about 9 to 10 inches high. This esoteric piece is missing the arms, which were attached to the main body with wooden pins, and the feet, which attached this piece to the model platform. This is often the case with model figurines of this type, as one complete figurine was made of several pieces. This piece was originally coated with a white gesso, and was then painted with several pigments; and in this case, there are sections of white gesso with red, black, and blue pigments. The exposed wood is a nice tan honey color, and the overall piece is very light in weight. One of the arms probably balanced the basket that is seen on her head, and the other arm likely hung down at her side. These arms were attached to the main body with round wooden dowels, and the deteriorated remains of these rounded wooden dowles can be seen within the rounded holes where they were inserted into the shoulders of the torso. The carving of this piece is exquisite, and is very erotic, as there are graceful contours of the female form, and the torso has an elongated sensual design. The sensual design of this piece conveys an easy body movement, as the left leg is seen slightly striding in front of the other which indicates an easy stride, and this is another design feature that this piece has that one can easily perceive. One of the shoulders is also slightly larger than the other, as one arm was raised to support the basket, and the other arm hung down at the side. This piece was likely part of an offering model that was placed in the tomb of its owner, and these models provided sustenance for the deceased. There is also a notch at the bottom of the back right leg, and this fitted to a peg that attached this piece to the base of the model. An analogous female figurine from the same period, with a basket on the head that is part of a procession scene, can be seen in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, in the exhibit "The Secrets of Tomb 10A: Egypt 2000 B.C.", which runs until May 16, 2010. A photo of this analogous female figurine can also be seen in the Jan./Feb. issue of Archaeology Magazine, p.14. Additional female model figurines can be seen in "Models of Daily Life in Ancient Egypt, From the Tomb of Meket-Re at Thebes" by H.E. Winlock, London, 1955. An analogous example of nearly the same size, with no arms, and with the left leg striding forward can be seen in Christies Antiquities, Dec. 2003, no. 33. ($16,730.00 realized, and see attached photo.) A complete figurine can be seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, June 1995, no. 14. (This exceptional piece is approximately 12.8 inches high, and dates to the early 12th Dynasty. The female form and artistic style of the torso is very analogous to the piece offered here. $40,000-$60,000.00 estimates, $57,500.00 realized.) This piece is also a type with the left leg advanced as seen in "Egyptian Servant Statues" by J.H. Breasted, Washington D.C., 1948, Pl. 56b. The exceptional piece offered here has also been examined by Selim Dere of Fortuna Fine Arts in New York, Alan Safani of Safani Galleries in New York, and Dr. Robert Bianchi. Ex: Private French collection. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Alan Safani Galleries, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Pierre Berge & Asso. Paris, Archeologie, June 2011, no. 101. Euro 5,000.00-7,000.00 estimates. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a French Export Passport.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1304362
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This attractive piece is a Greek Boeotian blackware kantharos, and dates circa 450-425 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.6 inches high, by 7.5 inches wide from handle to handle, and is a large example. This esoteric piece has a nice even lustrous black glaze, with a multi-colored iridescent patina over the glaze, and a high degree of eye appeal. This Greek kantharos is a Classic Period type vessel, as can be seen with the two looped handles and the long stemmed base, and this piece is also classified as being a "Type A" type due to this design. This type of piece is also seen on many Greek Classical Period coins and painted ceramics. This type of vessel was used for drinking wine at drinking parties which is known as a "symposium", and was also used for ceremonial offerings. This superb and beautiful piece is intact, and has some spotty white calcite deposits seen in various sections of the piece, and is heavy at the inner bottom of the vessel. There is also some minor roughness seen in sections of the inner bowl, otherwise this piece is in near flawless condition. This piece also have a deep even black glaze seen on the inner and outer surfaces, and there are no pressure cracks and/or repair seen anywhere on this vessel. (Another analogous example was offered at Christie's Antiquities, London, Oct. 2011, no. 71. This piece was approximately 11 inches high, with a faint painted white ivy tendril that runs around the main body of the vessel. $4,600.00-$7,500.00 estimates, $9,246.00 realized.) (Another analogous example can be seen in the Louvre Museum, Paris, Inv. no. MNC 670, and bears an incised inscription that is a sacred dedication. The lengthy inscription is in the Boeotian alphabet, and this vessel is thought to have come from Thespiae.) The attractive piece offered here is scarce to rare in this intact condition, and is seldom offered on the market. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1378394
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865.00
This scarce piece is an Egyptian faience two-faced amulet bust that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.25 inches high, and is an intact example. This piece was originally made as a figurine of the Egyptian god Pataikos, and has an attractive light green glaze. This interesting piece has nearly two identical "mold-made" faces seen on each side of the bust in a "Janus" type design. This appealing Egyptian bust also shows the two faces sharing the same bald head, and these faces have deeply molded features that convey a slight smile and serene expression. This piece was likely made as a "protector" type work of art, and may also have doubled as the god Bes and Pataikos, thus having additional protective powers. The Egyptian god Pataikos was derived from a Phoenician "dwarf-form", and was a "protector" type god which is also sometimes referred to as a "Ptah-Seker" god. Pataikos was also a popular god in ancient Egypt, and was always present among the workers in precious-metal workshops in Old Kingdom scenes of daily life. The piece seen here was also likely to have been intentionally and ceremoniously broken in antiquity, which subsequently killed the magic of the piece. This scarce piece is in superb condition, has a nice colored glaze, and is a large example for the type. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1027193
Apolonia Ancient Art
$765.00
This extremely rare piece is an early Islamic glass flask, circa 6th-8th century A.D. This intact piece is approximately 2.8 inches high, and is a light green color with multi-colored iridescence that is seen on various inner and outer sections of the vessel. This piece is rather thick walled, has a fairly wide indented bottom, a short tubular neck that has a slight flattening at the base, and a pontil-mark on the bottom. In addition, the neck is folded to the inside, and there are three stepped bulges seen within the neck which are a light yellow, green, and purple color. This piece is likely an early example of Islamic glass, due to the overall fabric of the vessel and the neck design as noted above. This piece is from an extremely rare early Islamic glass group, and some of these extremely rare pieces from this group are also listed as "possibly Sassanian", but given the probable region, i.e. Syro-Palestinian or Cypriot, where this piece was likely manufactured, a Sassanian attribution from modern day central Iran is highly unlikely. This piece, as being from this extremely rare early Islamic glass group, is also one of the earliest Islamic glass examples recorded. An analogous example listed as "possibly Islamic and of possible Syro-Palestinian or Cypriot manufacture", approximately 2.5 inches high, is seen in "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum", by John B. Hayes, Royal Ontario Museum Pub., 1975, no. 670. (See attached photo.) Another extremely rare example is seen in Sotheby Park Bernet Inc., Important Antiquities, New York, Dec. 1978, no. 138. (This piece is nearly the same size as the piece offered here, and is listed as "probably later Sassanian or early Islamic, circa 5th-8th century A.D.") The example offered here has a type of construction within the neck that required a great deal of skill, and is more advanced than the typical late Roman blown glass that is seen in the 4th-5th century A.D. Islamic glass also tends to have several colors within the glass, in contrast to the Sassanian culture, which was known for producing faceted cut glass that was more uniform in color. The Sassanian culture, circa 6th-8th century A.D., was from central modern day Iran, and was very skilled at glass production, and they are known for being able to take a solid cube of glass and carve/sculpt this into a faceted cup, bowl, or a plate. The exceptional small flask offered here is not only in mint condition, but it is also a type that is not seen on the market or in private collections. This extremely rare piece is a little gem and would be an excellent addition to a collection of ancient glass. Ex: Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1259952
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This scarce coin is a silver tetradrachm that was minted in the name of Alexander the Great, circa 311-305 B.C. This coin is approximately 26 mm in diameter, weighs 17.1 grams, is perfectly centered, and is in about extremely fine/extremely fine condition: EF-/EF. This piece also has attractive old cabinet toning, and has an even light gray patina. The obverse has the head of Herakles facing right, wearing a lion's skin headdress, and the obverse is seen in extremely high relief. The obverse has superb artistic style, and the eye of Herakles is seen wide open and is slightly upturned. This is a Greek Hellenistic convention of art that also is meant to portray a deified god, and the portrait seen here may also represent Alexander the Great in the guise of Herakles. The reverse has a seated Zeus facing left, holding an eagle in his extended right arm, with the name of "Alexander" seen behind, and "King" below in Greek lettering. In addition, there is a monogram seen below the throne that is seen within a victory wreath, and the letters "MI" are seen before the throne with a symbol seen below. This symbol represents a type of scythe known as a "grape picker", and this weapon was used on a long pole in order to attack cavalry by slashing and pulling down the rider from his horse. This type of weapon was especially effective against heavy armored riders, who removed from their mounts, could then easily be dispatched by an infantryman. This symbol is extremely rare, with only one recorded example by Martin Price in "The Coinage in the Name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus", The British Museum, 1991. Price also classified this coin as being from the "MI" series, Babylon Mint, circa 311-305 B.C., nos. 3745-3775. The coin offered here is analogous to no. 3768, which is listed as having a "sickle" symbol. This symbol is extremely rare relative to ancient Greek numismatics, and the coin offered here, and the Price example may be the only two recorded examples. In addition, Nancy Waggoner in "The Alexander Mint at Babylon", Columbia University, 1968, thought that the "MI" series, denoted by the "MI" letters seen on the reverse, was a result in a change in the mint personnel at Babylon with the resumption of power there by Seleucus I, circa 311 B.C. Seleucus I gained power in Babylon by wrestling control of Babylon from Antigonos I Monophthalmos, and finally defeating him at the battle of Ipsos circa 301 B.C. The coin offered here may in fact be the first coin issue minted by Seleucus I, and it is interesting to note that the symbols seen on the "MI" series are military in nature, and some of these symbols include a "double-ax", a "ship's prow", and a "spearhead". The "MI" letters are also seen on several subsequent regal coin issues of Seleucus I after circa 305 B.C. The coin offered here is an Alexander the Great type that is seldom seen on the market with the symbols attributed to Seleucus I, and was an issue that helped to secure Seleucus I as "King of Asia". Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1278991
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This attractive Greek ceramic is a Boeotian black-gloss kantharos, and dates circa 450-425 B.C. This piece is approximately 8 inches high, by 10 inches wide from handle to handle, and is extra large in size for the type and gracefully proportioned. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, as it also has a rich deep loustrous black glaze seen over the entire piece, save the bottom of the vessel that has a reddish-tan reserve. The interior of the vessel also has an even deep black glaze, and this is an indication that this vessel was specifically made to hold a liquid, such as wine. This piece is catagorized as being a "Type D", and is the largest type for the period, and is amoung the largest Boeotian black-glazed kantharos cups. (For the type see: "Black Glaze Pottery from Rhitsona in Boeotia", by P.N. Ure, Oxford University Press, 1913, Pl. XIII.) This type of kantharos is also known as a "Sessile" type kantharos, which is characterized by it's lack of a raised stemmed base and a small torus disk foot. The form of this vessel is wheel made from a very fine reddish-tan colored clay, and the bowl and base was made as one single piece, with the large arching strap handles applied separately before firing. Small "spurs" project from the lower part of the handles, and they are likely "finger-grips". Flat bars connect the upper part of the handles to the main body of the vessel, and this creates a volute-like profile. The body of the cup has a thin flared upper rim, and a large torus ring foot with a flat base. The shape of this piece was made and used throughout ancient Greece, and the main areas of production for these black-glazed vessels was Attica and the region of Boeotia just northeast of the Gulf of Corinth. The reddish color of the fabric of this vessel also suggests that it may be of Attic manufacture, and/or is a product of an Athenian potter working in Boeotia using Attic source material. (This theory was also put forth by P.N. Ure in the work noted above, p.12, and he comments on the Boeotian black glazed vessels from the Fifth Century: "Such vessels as these and those of the Teisias Group suggest Boeotia occupied one of the very foremost positions in connection with the black glaze industry of this period. Wheather it was as producer or mearly as a purchaser is another question".) This type of vessel offered here is also seen on "Attic red-figure" ceramics that portray Dionysaic drinking scenes that often show satyrs dancing with a cup of this type. It may be that this type of cup was produced more for drinking ceremonies, rather than for funeral purposes which seems to be the case for smaller black-glazed vessels of this type. This attractive piece is intact, has no repair/restoration, and is in it's natural mint to superb "as found" condition. This piece has some nice minute root marking, and some heavy and spotty white calcite deposits seen in various sections of the vessel. An attractive large vessel for the type, and as such, is scarce on the market. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1356496
Apolonia Ancient Art
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These scarce nearly identical standing nude concubine gold earrings date circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. These erotic pieces are approximately 2.25 inches high, from the top of the hoop to the bottom of the figures, and are .3 inches wide at the shoulders. The figures themselves are approximately 1.5 inches high. These solid gold pieces together weigh 4.4 grams, and are not gold gilt over another metal which is sometimes the case relative to ancient jewelry. These attractive pieces are complete, and have no restoration/repair. These pieces are also very durably made, and are solid examples that can easily be worn today. Each of the figures are completely nude, and have some minute punched details such as dotted breast nipples, belly button circles, circular eyes, and minute linear hair. Each figurine also appears to be wearing an Egyptian type wig, and the standing body pose is classic Egyptian, with the arms straight down at the sides and the legs tightly together. The frontal design is slightly raised on both pieces, and the back of both earrings are mostly flat. Each figure is also made from two gold sheets that were folded over, and this doubling of the thin gold sheet gave these earrings some added strength. These earrings are highly erotic, and were likely worn to identify a woman who was a concubine for a wealthy and/or important person in antiquity. They also resemble the goddess Isis, and these pieces may have been worn in a religious capacity as well. The nude figurines also resemble a small carved ivory Egyptian concubine that is now seen in the Walters Art Museum. (This piece is approximately 2.5 inches high, and the back is flat as the gold earrings offered here. This piece was also purchased by Henry Walters in 1930. Inventory no.: 71.522. See attached photo.) The scarce to rare erotic gold earrings offered here can easily be worn today, as they also have thick gold hoops that are very solid. It's likely that these pieces were worn in antiquity, and may also have been a votive type object worn in the afterlife. A custom metal earring stand is included. Ex: D. Weller collection, Essen, Germany, circa 1930's-1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1304461
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This group of Greco-Roman ceramics date circa 4th century B.C.-1st century A.D. All of these pieces are intact, and have no restoration/repair. This group are mainly household type wares, as they were likely used for everyday use, and this varied group has: (1) Greek blackware skyphos, approximately 7 inches wide from handle to handle, by 2 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (1) Greek Apulian dish, approximately 4.2 inches in diameter, by 1.5 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (2) Greek Apulian blackware lekythos, approximately 3.2 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (1) Greek aryballos brown/black bottle, approximately 3.4 inches high, circa 3rd-2nd century B.C. (1) Greek Apulian skyphos with olive painted design, approximately 2.25 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (1) Roman red terracotta oil lamp, circa 1st century A.D. This group is a nice collection with a wide variety of types and shapes. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1990's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #594153
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This attractive piece is a Greek terracotta amphora that dates circa 1100-700 B.C., and is Sub-Mycenaean (Iron Age I & II). This light red terracotta is intact and has nice heavy white calcite deposits seen within the vessel. There are also spotty white calcite deposits seen on the outside surface and the inner surface has traces of root marking. This piece was probably used a table ware vessel and is approximately 4.6 inches high. The design of this piece also follows earlier Minoan pottery forms, and the piece offered here may pre-date circa 1100 B.C. as well. There are also circular imprints seen on the flat base, and the main body of this piece was created on a potter's wheel, which also makes this piece one of the earliest Greek pottery types created in this fashion. A nice intact vessel with good eye appeal. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This unique piece is a stamped plaque that is made from lead. This piece is Italic, and dates circa mid 16th to the late 17th century A.D. This interesting piece is approximately 2.7 inches wide, by 2.1 inches high, and by .15 inches thick. The shape of this piece is oval, and as such, was likely an inlay for a furniture piece or a box, rather than part of a large pendant for a necklace and/or pectoral. The backside of this piece is flat, and this piece was made in the same fashion as a Roman bronze sestertius or Renaissance medallion coin would have been made, with a carved die that was hand struck into the prepared heated lead flan. This method of manufacture allowed one to make several examples of this piece, however, the piece offered here may be the only recorded example, as our research has not found any other pieces. In fact, all of these lead plaques are very rare, as lead is very soft and is easy to damage, melts very easily, and can simply be easily used later on to make other objects. The piece offered here has a light brown patina with a thin oxidized crust over the outer surface, moreover, the condition of this piece is superb with no major tears, dents, or scraps as lead is a very soft material. There are also micro black dendrites which indicate that this piece has been buried for quite some time. There is a small hole seen at the top which may have held an attachment pin. This piece shows a seated, virile figure that is seen half draped, and is seen holding a round object in his extended right hand which may be an apple. This seated figure appears to be examining and looking at the round object that he is seen holding up in front of himself, and there is a strong possibility that the figure is the Trojan prince Paris, who is contemplating as to whom he should award the prize. According to Greek myth, it was Paris who was chosen by the gods to decide which of the three goddesses - Juno, Minerva, or Venus - was the fairest, and the prize was an apple. Venus won the prize who in turn awarded Paris the mortal Helen, and this triggered the Trojan War. The Trojan prince Aeneas, subsequently fled the ruins of Troy to found the city of Rome, as praised by the Roman poet Virgil, who prophesied a "new golden age" as founded by Augustus, the first or Roman emperors. Virgil, Horace, and Propertius, who are considered the greatest writers in Roman literature, all embraced Augustus' propaganda campaign in creating the "myth of Augustus", which fostered the idea that Augustus was the one chosen by the gods to preside over the new empire. This literary propaganda campaign legitimized Augustus' hold on power after the bloody civil wars, and in the same context, there are several Roman works of art that served the same purpose. The piece offered here points back to the founding of Rome, and another rare Roman work of art that is considered by many academics to fit into this category is the Portland Vase, and the seated figure seen on the Portland Vase known as "Figure E" is thought to be Paris as well. The artistic style of "Figure E" is also very analogous to the seated figure seen on the piece offered here, as both are seated, both are nude except for drapery that falls over the thighs, both have a virile muscular build, and both have the same type of hair style. (See "Glass of the Caesars" by Donald Harden, The British Museum Pub., London, 1987, p. 59.) The piece offered here was also examined by Dr. Wolfgang Fischer-Bossert of the German Archaeological Institute in Berlin, who dated this piece, and in addition, he thought there was a strong possibility that the maker of this piece saw the Portland Vase. The seated figure seen on the piece offered here is seen centered in front of a fountain with a lion's head spout. There are also architectural elements seen at the back of the seated figure, including a building with a round dome that may be a representation of the Pantheon. The overall scene may be one set in the Campus Martius (Field of Mars), and is the location where Augustus was cremated and where his Mausoleum was built. The piece offered here is an important work of Italic Renaissance art, according to Dr. Fischer-Bossert, but this piece is obviously in need of further academic study. A custom stand is included. Ex: Private English collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1131587
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This beautiful and vibrant piece is a Greek Apulian lidded mug that dates circa 330 B.C. This piece has been attributed to the Menzies painter, and is approximately 7.5 inches high with the lid. This beautiful piece is also known as a kothon, and this type of vessel normally has a knobbed lid and extended neck, as seen with the piece offered here. This piece is mint quality, with no repair/restoration, and has very vibrant white, yellow, red, and black colors. This piece has a rounded knobbed handle at the top center of the lid, and there are two female heads seen at the top, along with a detailed acanthus pattern between. These female heads are known as a "lady of fashion" portrait, and is thought by many academics to represent Demeter and/or Persephone. To the Greeks the fertility of the ground was closely associated with death, and the seed-corn was buried in the dark during the summer months before the autumnal sowing. The return of life and burial is symbolized in the myth of Persephone's abduction and return, and gave rise to the ritual of the Eleusinian Mysteries, in which the worshippers believed that the restoration of the goddess to the upper world promised the faithful their own resurrection from death. This lidded vessel also probably held a burial offering such as grain, or a product that could have been used by the deceased in the afterlife. This attractive vessel also has a winged Eros that is seen in motion to the right, and is seen holding a box and a tambourine. There is also an ivy leaf pattern seen on the neck of the vessel, along with additional decorative floral elements seen on the main body of the vessel. Overall, this vessel is highly decorated, with many design patterns that cover the entire main body of the vessel, and as such, has been attributed by A.D. Trendall as Type VIII. This piece also has a single "Herakles-knot" type designed handle, and is an exceptional example for the type. This beautiful piece is also from the Michael Waltz collection, and another slightly smaller lidded mug from this same collection is seen with Royal Athena Galleries, New York, no. GMZ02, $4,750.00 estimate. (Another analogous example of nearly the same size is seen in Christies Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2011, no.138. $3,000.00-$5,000.00 estimates, $5,250.00 realized.) The piece offered here is one of the finest examples offered on the market, and is scarce in this mint condition. Ex: Michael Waltz collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1226221
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This Thasos silver tetradrachm coin is mint state (FDC) to superb quality grade (EF+/EF+), and dates circa circa 2nd-1st century B.C. This superb graded piece is approximately 34 mm wide, and weighs 17.1 gms. This attractive piece is well centered and shows on the obverse (Obv.) a young bust of Dionysus, wreathed with grape leaves and bunches. The reverse (Rev.) shows a very muscular nude standing Herakles, holding a club in his right hand, and over his left arm, a cloak made from the skin of the Nemean lion. The impressive standing nude Herakles, is also more defined and muscular than what is normally seen, and this coin is a better example than most of the other examples that have been on the market. The (Rev.) also shows a legend in Greek lettering seen on each side of Herakles and below. The lettering to the right reads "HERAKLES"; and below reads "THASOS", which refers to the island of Thasos where this coin was likely minted. This coin type is also classified as a Celtic imitation of the Thasos types, and this is likely the case for this coin type, but it may be that the majority of these coins were minted by Thasos for trade with the Thracian interior. The pieces with better artistic style are generally recognized as being from the Thasos mint, as the piece offered here, and the piece offered here has great artistic style for the period. Thasos is a Greek island in the northern Aegean Sea off the coast of Thrace, and was colonized by the Phoenicians for its gold mines. The Phoenicians also established a religious cult on the island to their god Melkart, who later came to be identified with the Greek god Herakles when the island was Hellenized circa 650 B.C. The depiction of the Thracian wine god Dionysus was also adopted on the subsequent Thracian coinage as well. In 197 B.C., the Romans defeated Philip V of Macedon at the battle of Cynoscephalae, and thus made Thasos a "free" city state. Pliny the Elder was later to describe Thasos as still being a "free" city state in the 1st century A.D. This coin is better than most examples, regarding the artistic style and the impressive muscular Herakles seen on the reverse, and has traces of mint luster. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1989. References: Sear 1759. BMC 74. SNG Copenhagen 1046. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre 1492 item #1268018
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This beautiful and vibrant piece is a Greek Apulian lidded mug that dates circa 310 B.C. This piece has been attributed to the Kantharos Group, and is approximately 8.25 inches high with the lid. This beautiful piece is also known as a kothon, and this type of vessel normally has a knobbed lid and extended neck, as seen with the piece offered here. This piece is mint quality, with no repair/restoration, and has very vibrant white, yellow, red, and black colors. This piece has a rounded knobbed handle seen at the top center of the lid, and there are two female heads seen on the top of the lid, along with a detailed acanthus pattern between. There is also a large female head seen on the main body of the vessel facing left, along with the top section of a white and red wing that is seen curling up at the front of her face. The female head is also seen wearing a detailed sakkos in her hair that is highlighted with dotted and cross patterns, and is also wearing an elaborate earring and dotted necklace. This figure likely represents a winged "Eros", and this portrait type is also known as a "lady of fashion", and is thought by many academics to also represent Demeter and/or Persephone. To the ancient Greeks the fertility of the ground was closely associated with the autumnal sowing. The return of life and burial is symbolized in the myth of Persephone's abduction and return, and gave rise to the ritual of the Eleusinian Mysteries, in which the worshippers believed that the restoration of the goddess to the upper world promised the faithful their own resurrection from death. This lidded vessel probably held a burial offering such as grain, or a product that could have been used by the deceased in the afterlife. This attractive vessel also has highly decorative floral patterns that are seen on each side of the lady's portrait, and a single "Herakles-knot" type designed handle. This piece is better than most examples of it's type, and another analogous example of this type of vessel of nearly the same size and condition was offered in Christie's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2011, no. 138. ($3,000.00-$5000.00 estimates, $5,250.00 realized. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is among one of the best examples offered on the market, and is scarce in this mint condition. Ex: G. van Driesum collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Michael Waltz collection, Germany, circa 1970's-1980's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1328301
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This piece is a superb example of an Italic bronze "Kouros" figurine, and is an early Etruscan example that dates to the Archaic Period, circa 6th century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.8 inches high, by .72 inches wide. This complete and intact bronze is in the form of a nude standing male "Kouros", which is a Greek convention of art design that was derived from earlier Egyptian statuary, and was geometric in design, rather than realistic in form. This standing piece is also very analogous to the standing figural Greek "Kouros" and "Korai" type of statuary which was produced in the 7th-6th century B.C. This piece was cast as one solid figure, and was then hand stamped with round circles for the eyes, nipples, and navel. This piece also has earlier "Geometric Period" artistic style with squared angled shoulders and jaw, arms straight down at the sides, and a serene face which looks alive with the large round eyes. There are also incised lines on the hands and feet which define fingers and toes. In addition, this piece has a beautiful dark green patina with some spotty dark red highlights. This piece has an analogous artistic style as the piece seen in "The Etruscans", Mario Torelli ed., Rizzoli Pub. 2000, page 591. This piece can also stand by itself, as it has extended feet which forms a solid base. This piece has a custom Plexiglas display stand as well. This scarce and superb piece has better detail that what is usually seen on pieces of this type, as it has very little wear because it was a "votive" type piece. Ex: Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 1994, no. 174. ($2,000.00-$3,000.00 estimates.) Ex: New York private collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Byzantine : Pre AD 1000 item #1246608
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This superb bronze ring is late Roman/Byzantine type, circa 4th-5th century A.D., and is approximately ring size 8.5, and is .3 inches wide at the flat face. This piece is solid bronze, and is in superb condition, with only some minute smooth wear on the inner surface. The outer surfaces have great detail, with decorative floral line design on each side of the ring leading up to the flat, square central face. The central face has a Byzantine type cross seen within a "four dotted circular pattern" design. The Byzantine cross appears to be hidden within this "four dotted circular pattern" design, and perhaps this was the intention of the ring maker, as during the period that this ring was made, the so-called Christian cult was becoming more widespread within the Roman Empire. This ring was likely made for a young man or woman, and has a perfectly round diameter. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina, with some light brown mineral deposits seen mostly on the inner surface and the low relief sections of the outer surface. The low relief sections of the outer surface also define the designs seen on this ring. Several rings of this type can be seen in "Die Welt Von Byzanz", by H. Wamser, Theiss Pub., 2004, nos. 667-674. (See attached photo.) A small ring stand also comes with this piece, and this ring can easily be worn today. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1367981
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This intact and dainty Greek Boeotian Greek kylix dates circa 400-375 B.C., and is approximately 2.6 inches high, by 8.25 inches wide from handle to handle. This pleasing little piece has black, brown, and dark orange colors which follows the traditional fabric of ancient Greek Attic and Boeotian ceramics for the period. This piece has olive sprigs painted around the outer body of the piece that have brown stems and black olives. There is also a black band above the stemmed base, and a black band under the flat base. The interior of the bowl has a wide outer black band with two circles and a dotted center. The overall shape is very esoteric and is an extremely fine example for the period. This piece is completely intact, and is in superb to mint condition with only some minute stress cracks seen at the base of one of the handles. This piece also has some spotty white calcite deposits, and has a high degree of eye appeal. (Another analogous piece of this type was offered by Charles Ede Limited, Catalog 176, 2005, no. 47. See attached photo.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1170187
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This mint quality piece is a Greek Hellenistic "spindle" type amphora, and dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 3rd-2nd century B.C. This piece is approximately 10.8 inches high by 3 inches in diameter at the center, and is larger than most examples. This intact piece has an elongated neck and stemmed base, with an overlapping lip which allowed this piece to easily be sealed at the top. This piece likely held a precious liquid such as a fine olive oil or perfume. The shape of this nice piece allowed this piece to be easily transported and stored. This type of vessel may also have been used in antiquity multiple times as well. Greek amphora bottles of this type were also used as a votive object, and have been found in burials throughout the ancient Greek world. This piece is also larger than what is usually seen, and is in mint condition, which make this a scarce example. This piece is made from a tan terracotta, and can stand by itself, as it has a flat bottom. This elegant piece has a great deal of eye appeal, as it has attractive light tan/brown earthen deposits and has a very esoteric shape. For the type see "Balkani: Antiche Civilta tra il Danubio e l'Adriatico" by Tatjana Cvjeticanin, Giovanni Gentili, and Vera Krstic, Silvana Editoriale Pub., 2007, no. 140. This piece also sits on a custom stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: