Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1352064
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This vibrant piece is a Greek Apulian "Red-Figure" plate that dates circa 340-320 B.C., and is approximately 9.8 inches in diameter by 2 inches high. This mint quality vessel is attributed to the Menzies Painter, who likely worked from the workshop of the Patera and Ganymede Painters. This workshop produced some of the best painters for the period, and pieces from this workshop have their own distinctive attributes that are seen in their compositions. This mint quality piece has no repair/restoration, and in addition, has very vibrant black, white, yellow, and dark orange colors. The top side of this beautiful vessel has a nude winged Eros moving left, and is holding a patera plate in the extended right hand, and a tambourine in the left hand. The facial details of this nude Eros are delicately drawn, and convey a portrait of an eternally young god. The wings are also delicately rendered, and have four dotted lines and a row of white brush lines seen within the wings, and these are some of the artistic hallmarks of the Menzies Painter. There is also a decorated alter seen behind the Eros, and a growing plant and hanging garment at the front. The nude Eros is also seen walking on an "egg-and-dart" decorated ground line, and the scene is framed by an outer "ivy leaf" and inner "wave-pattern" type border. The young nude Eros may also be celebrating the change of seasons, and the reproductive regeneration of the earth. Apulian plates of this type were usually votive, as they represent eternal life for the deceased relative to the scenes that they represent. This piece also has an attractive lustrous black painted reserve at the bottom, along with a raised footed base. This piece also has some spotty white calcite deposits and minute root marking which are excellent signs of authenticity. This piece also has a TL authenticity test document from Gutachten Lab, Germany, no. 07B280616. (This piece is also analogous to another example seen in Christie's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2005, no. 259. This Christie's example is also 10 inches in diameter, and has a standing nude Eros holding a plate. $4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates, $3,840.00 realized. See attached photo.) For the type attributed to the Menzies Painter see A.D. Trendall, "Red Figure Vases of South Italy and Sicily", London, 1989, Fig. 244-247. A custom Plexiglas plate stand is also included. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1960's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including the TL document noted above, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1357958
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This exceptional piece is a Greek/Scythian iron short sword that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 3rd-2nd century B.C. This attractive iron weapon is larger than most examples, and is approximately 12.9 inches high, by 3.5 inches wide at the hilt which is in the middle section of the piece. This scarce iron piece is dark brown, and has some spotty light brown highlights. This piece was also hand forged from iron, and is a "four-part construction" type piece. This piece is made up with a "V-shaped blade", a "decorative curved hilt", a "handle bar", and a "pommel end bar" that has a single rivet that holds it onto the "handle bar". This rivet is made from a section of the "handle bar" that fitted through the "pommel end bar", and was hammered down over the "pommel end bar" which holds it in place. The "decorative curved hilt" is identical on each side of the piece, and it gives a very esoteric look to the piece as well. The overall construction is very solid, and this piece is a very durable weapon. The "V-shaped blade" also has hammered "blood lines" down the center, and this strengthened the "V-shaped blade" and allowed for a tight fit in a scabbard. There is also a grooved "slot" seen on one side of the "handle bar", and this likely held a wooden or bone handle into place that was fitted over the "handle bar". The condition of this piece is superb to mint quality, and is one of the best recorded iron examples of this type of weapon. The surface has some minor pitting from hammering and wear, and the piece was conditioned by a major museum in Germany. This piece has no repair/restoration, and there is some minute fill at the extreme tip end, which has also prevented the tip from breaking off. This piece is of the type that has been found in ancient Thrace, and the region around the Black Sea. Overall, an exceptional large example with excellent preservation and metal quality. This piece also sits on a custom metal display stand. Another analogous example was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, 2017, No. HM1102. (This Royal Athena Galleries piece is nearly the same length as the piece offered here, 11.25 inches long, and has some wear and losses. The Royal Athena piece is also offered at $7500.00. See attached photo.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1326070
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,265.00
This nice Greek vessel is a silver kantharos that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 2nd-1st century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.5 inches high, by 5.4 inches wide from handle to handle. This rare piece has a dark gray patina with dark brown highlights, has not been over cleaned, and has natural surfaces. This piece was made from five separate parts: the main hand beaten body of the piece, two cast handles, a ring base, and a round base tubular extension. The main body of the piece also has an attractive "volute fluted" pattern that runs around the main body of the vessel, and several hand punched dots that are seen running around the base of the rim. This superb piece is intact, and has some limited repair, with only the secure reattachment of the handles and footed base which appears to have been done some time ago. There are three short and visual stress cracks that are seen running down from the upper rim into the main body of the piece that are about .3 inches, but other than that, this piece is a superb example that is intact, and is a solid example. These cracks were likely the result of ground pressure, and also point to the authenticity of the vessel. The overall design of this esoteric Greek vessel is rare, especially with the volute pattern and the "flat handles" that are normally seen on subsequent Roman period vessels. A silver vessel kantharos cup seen in "Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate", by D.E. Strong, London, 1966, p. 114, dating from the second century B.C., has analogous "flat handles" as the vessel offered here, and is described as having two "long horizontal thumb grips". This piece featured by D.E. Strong is now seen in the National Hermitage Museum, Leningrad, and is also described as being a "Greek vessel with elaborate ornament". The Greek vessel offered here may also be among the first vessels of this type with a "flat handle" design, and was the Greek prototype for the subsequent Roman period silver kantharos type cups that had this analogous "flat handle" design. The piece offered here not only is a rare example that has an esoteric design, but it also has superb eye appeal and is one of the best recorded examples. Ex: Private Austrian collection circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1038446
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,375.00
This mint quality little Greek stemless kylix is an Attic ceramic that dates circa 480-470 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.5 inches wide from handle to handle, and is approximately 2.25 inches high. This intact piece is nearly flawless, and has a nice brilliant deep black glaze, especially on the inside of the bowl. This piece also has an offset lip, as seen with the line that runs around the bowl, and is classified as being part of the "Inset Lip Class, circa 480-470 B.C". For the discussion of the type as a whole see: "The Athenian Agora, Vol.12", by B. Sparks and L. Talcott, Princeton University, 1970. This piece is scarce in this mint quality condition, is an exceptional example for the type, and has a beautiful thick glozzy black glaze. Ex: Private Swiss collection. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1372975
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This dainty and mint conditioned Greek Attic kylix dates circa 4th century B.C., and is approximately 1.75 inches high, by 6.6 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece has a lustrous black blaze and is seen on the outer and inner surfaces of the piece, save for the bottom of the vessel that has an unglazed section. This unglazed reserved section also has a "circle-and-dot" design element seen on the bottom center of the vessel. The shoulder of the piece is slightly offset, and is a well made example. This piece is also in flawless condition, with no repair/restoration, and has a great deal of muti-colored iridescence patina. There is also some spotty and minute white calcite deposits. A flawless Greek Attic vessel with nice eye appeal. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1136766
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This esoteric little piece is a Greek Boeotian terracotta that dates from the early to the mid 5th century B.C. This intact piece is approximately 5.8 inches high, and has no repair/restoration. This piece is a light brown/red terracotta, and there are traces of a white slip and tan earthen deposits. This appealing piece was mold made and depicts a nude young man, who is seen holding a pet cock against his body in the crook of his right arm, and in his left hand, an aryballos with a strigil. This standing young man is seen completely nude, and generally, this Boeotian terracotta type normally has the standing nude young man wearing a symmetrical himation, which is seen from the front framing his nude body from his back and sides. (See attached photo of a young man wearing a himation, which is seen in the British Museum and in "Greek Terracottas" by R.A. Higgins, Methuen & Co. Pub., London, 1967, Pl. 33, no. E.) This piece also has a large rectangular vent hole seen at the back, has the left leg slightly forward, and the figure is seen on a square base that is open on the inside. According to Higgins on page 77 in the reference noted above, "The purpose of these pieces would seem to be rather different from that of most Greek terracottas, which tended at most periods to represent deities, for these are clearly human. Many were found in tombs, and it is hard to escape the conclusion that they were intended to serve the same purpose as the Egyptian ushabtis-to minister to the needs of the dead in the next world." The piece seen here is a scarce type, as the young man is seen completely nude, and is not seen partially clothed with a himation. The completely nude type may also predate the types that are seen wearing a himation, and are likely the successors to the Greek "Kouros" type in sculpture that dates circa 510-490 B.C. The piece offered here has stylistic features that are analogous to the Greek "Kouros" type in sculpture such as: the stiff upright pose with one leg advanced slightly forward, a totally nude body, and square shoulders. This nude young man also appears to be on the way, or returning from the gymnasium, as the aryballos held oil for exercise, and the strigil was used to clean it from the body. A scarce piece with a great deal of eye appeal. A custom black wooden display stand is also included. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1230491
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This attractive piece is a Greek bronze applique that dates circa 3rd-2nd century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.6 inches high by 3.7 inches wide, and is a complete example. This piece is composed of two overlapping palmette fronds which are seen emerging from a central raised bowl. There is a spiral tendril, seen below the raised bowl, which each extend to each side of the decorative raised bowl. This piece was likely part of a bronze vessel such as a hydria, or possibly a oinochoe, and served purely as a decorative element. This piece was attached with a pin, and the piece is slightly curved from top to bottom. This concave shape allowed this piece to extend away from the surface of the object it was attached to, and this gave this piece a great deal of added eye appeal. This complete piece has a lovely dark green patina with some spotty dark red highlights, some dark green/brown mineral deposits, and is an attractive intact example. This type of decorative anthemion element was also seen on buildings and Attic grave stele. For the type, see C. Clairmont, "Classical Attic Tombstones, vol. II", Kilchberg, 1993. A custom wooden and Plexiglas stand is included, and the piece can simply lift off of the stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1323957
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This superb to extremely fine coin is a Greek silver drachm attributed to Philip III, and was minted shortly after the death of Alexander the Great, circa 323 B.C. This coin was minted circa 323-319 B.C., is in superb to extremely fine condition (EF+/EF), is approximately 17 mm in diameter, weighs 4.2 gms, has nice centering, and a light gray patina. The obverse shows Herakles wearing a lion's skin headdress facing right, all within a dotted border. The reverse shows a seated Zeus, holding a standing eagle to the front, with a Greek monogram seen at the front and the name (Philip) in Greek lettering seen behind, all within a dotted border. This coin was minted in the name of Philip III Arridaeus, half brother of Alexander the Great, who was slated to share power with Alexander IV, the infant son of the late king Alexander the Great. The real power still lay behind the generals - Perdikkas, Antigonos, Lysimachos, Seleukos, Ptolomy and others - who were all biding their time for power. The coin offered here was likely minted by Antigonos, who had control of the bulk of Alexander's Asian posessions shortly after his death. This coin is also attributed to the mint of "Magnesia ad Maeandrum", and "minted circa 323-319 B.C." by Martin Price, who also noted that this mint was also controlled by Antigonos at the time this coin was minted. A nice coin with historical merit, and a nice quality example. References: Sear no. 6750; Price no. P56a. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #993691
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This impressive piece is a huge example of a Greek terracotta mother goddess. This piece dates from the Archaic Period, circa late 6th century-early 5th century B.C., and is an impressive 17 inches high. This attractive piece is intact, save for some minor repair at the base, and is 100% original. Given the extremely large size of this piece, this piece is in remarkable condition and it also stands by itself on its square base. This piece is also rare in this size, as the majority of Archaic period Greek terracottas of this type range from approximately 10-12 inches in height. This piece is also in "as found" condition, as it has a light gray earthen glaze that is layered over the light orange terracotta. This piece has a very lively face, as seen with a slight smile and large almond eyes, which are both hallmarks of "Archaic period" Greek art, and the overall effect is a face that is very serene. (For an "Archaic period" marble monument in the form of a sphinx, circa 550-525 B.C., with very analogous facial details to the terracotta offered here, see "Archaic Greek Art" by Gisela Richter, Oxford University Press, New York, 1949, p.76, fig. 121. This example was considered by Richter as having the best Greek Attic artistic style and "Attic grave monuments of the third quarter of the sixth century are among the finest extant.") The terracotta offered here may be an Attic type as well, and is also a type found on Samos. This type of archaic Greek standing goddess is seen holding a dove in her right hand, and is wearing a long pleated chiton. This piece may represent a votaress presenting an offering to Demeter or Persephone, and in this case the offering is a dove. This piece may also double as a votive offering itself, in addition as being an image of a votive standing mother goddess, and may be connected to reproduction and birth/rebirth. The design of this piece with one foot slightly placed in front of the other is also derived from Egyptian works of art. (For the type see R.A. Higgins, "Catalogue of the Terracottas in the Department of Greek and Roman Antiquities, British Museum, Vol I", London, 1954.) A custom black marble stand is included. Large Greek terracottas of this type are extremely rare to rare, especially in this superb condition, and are seldom seen on the market. Ex: Private Austrian collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1381567
Apolonia Ancient Art
$965.00
This attractive piece is a Greek black glazed glaux skyphos, and dates circa 4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 2.8 inches high, by 5.5 inches wide from handle to handle, and is in intact condition, with no repair and/or restoration. Overall, this piece is in superb to mint quality condition, save for some minor spotty roughness in the glaze of the outer surface, and has some spotty white calcite deposits. This piece has a deep lustrous black glaze seen on the inner and outer surfaces, and has a very distinctive design feature with one vertical and one horizontal handle. Both of these handles also have a different design, with the horizontal handle having a round design, and the vertical handle having a thick, flat design. The vertical handle was designed to hold this scarce vessel with the index finger, and the other handle was used to control the pouring of a liquid, such as concentrated wine that was mixed with water. The handle design also refers to the common name that this scarce type of vessel is known as, and this vessel type is often referred to as a "glaux skyphos". The bottom of the vessel has a small black dot, seen within a dark orange reserve, that is also seen within the bottom ring base. The piece offered here is seldom seen in this condition, and is one of the better recorded examples. Ex: Hans Piehler collection, Germany, circa 1940's-1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1261031
Apolonia Ancient Art
$765.00
This beautiful coin is a large Athenian silver tetradrachm that dates circa 136-80 B.C. The grade is superb to mint state, with some metal loss on the obverse, is approximately 15.5 grams, and is approximately 1.4 inches wide. The standing owl seen within the overall design on the reverse is approximately .75 inches high. Both sides are very well centered and the reverse is extremely detailed. This coin is very large and has a wide flan, is slightly larger than most examples, and resembles a medallion. This coin type is known as a "New Style" Athenian tetradrachm, which was minted in ancient Athens, and recalled the grandeur of the earlier golden age of Athens. Athens lost the Peloponnesian War to Sparta circa 404 B.C., was later defeated by Macedonia at Chaeronea circa 338 B.C., and her coinage was severely curtailed until circa 190 B.C., when she was finally able to start minting this coin series which is known as the "New Style" series. This coin type was also known to the ancient Greeks as "stephanephoroi", meaning "wreath bearers". This coin is nearly pure silver and was an international currency from the second century B.C. until the time of Augustus. These new Athenian coins, recalling an older more familiar design with the helmeted Athena's head on the obverse and the standing owl on the reverse, quickly became the dominant coin in the region. While their basic design remained unchanged with the goddess Athena and her owl, the obverse on this coin shows the goddess wearing a very stylized helmet, and the reverse shows a wreath encircling an extremely detailed owl balanced on an amphora. The letters on the reverse: A-OE, represent A-THENS, along with the civic symbol of Athens which is the standing owl. There is also a cornucopia symbol to the right of the amphora, and both of these symbols represented the commercial trading bounty of Athens. This coin would also make a great pendant, as it is large and has a great deal of eye appeal. In addition, this coin has a flat flan which is not concave, and this is also a positive feature for a pendant. Sear no. 2555. BMC 11., no. 503. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1990's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1375688
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This large piece is a Greek Attic "Black-figure" kylix that dates circa 5th century B.C., and is approximately 2.4 inches high, by 11 inches wide from handle to handle. This mint quality piece is intact with no repair/restoration, and has an even dark glossy black glaze. This lustrous black glaze is seen on the inner and outer surfaces, save the bottom of the kylix that has a light red terracotta reserve. The surfaces also have an attractive multi-colored iridescence patina seen in various sections of the vessel, and there is a dark orange and black palmette tondo seen in the bottom center of the vessel. This piece also has a ring base, and an offset shoulder seen on the inside of the vessel. An analogous example was offered in Sotheby's Antiquities, May, 1987, no. 258. ($400.00-$700.00 estimates, and is a smaller example.) A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1278991
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This attractive Greek ceramic is a Boeotian black-gloss kantharos, and dates circa 450-425 B.C. This piece is approximately 8 inches high, by 10 inches wide from handle to handle, and is extra large in size for the type and gracefully proportioned. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, as it also has a rich deep loustrous black glaze seen over the entire piece, save the bottom of the vessel that has a reddish-tan reserve. The interior of the vessel also has an even deep black glaze, and this is an indication that this vessel was specifically made to hold a liquid, such as wine. This piece is catagorized as being a "Type D", and is the largest type for the period, and is amoung the largest Boeotian black-glazed kantharos cups. (For the type see: "Black Glaze Pottery from Rhitsona in Boeotia", by P.N. Ure, Oxford University Press, 1913, Pl. XIII.) This type of kantharos is also known as a "Sessile" type kantharos, which is characterized by it's lack of a raised stemmed base and a small torus disk foot. The form of this vessel is wheel made from a very fine reddish-tan colored clay, and the bowl and base was made as one single piece, with the large arching strap handles applied separately before firing. Small "spurs" project from the lower part of the handles, and they are likely "finger-grips". Flat bars connect the upper part of the handles to the main body of the vessel, and this creates a volute-like profile. The body of the cup has a thin flared upper rim, and a large torus ring foot with a flat base. The shape of this piece was made and used throughout ancient Greece, and the main areas of production for these black-glazed vessels was Attica and the region of Boeotia just northeast of the Gulf of Corinth. The reddish color of the fabric of this vessel also suggests that it may be of Attic manufacture, and/or is a product of an Athenian potter working in Boeotia using Attic source material. (This theory was also put forth by P.N. Ure in the work noted above, p.12, and he comments on the Boeotian black glazed vessels from the Fifth Century: "Such vessels as these and those of the Teisias Group suggest Boeotia occupied one of the very foremost positions in connection with the black glaze industry of this period. Wheather it was as producer or mearly as a purchaser is another question".) This type of vessel offered here is also seen on "Attic red-figure" ceramics that portray Dionysaic drinking scenes that often show satyrs dancing with a cup of this type. It may be that this type of cup was produced more for drinking ceremonies, rather than for funeral purposes which seems to be the case for smaller black-glazed vessels of this type. This attractive piece is intact, has no repair/restoration, and is in it's natural mint to superb "as found" condition. This piece has some nice minute root marking, and some heavy and spotty white calcite deposits seen in various sections of the vessel. An attractive large vessel for the type, and as such, is scarce on the market. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1304362
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This attractive piece is a Greek Boeotian blackware kantharos, and dates circa 450-425 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.6 inches high, by 7.5 inches wide from handle to handle, and is a large example. This esoteric piece has a nice even lustrous black glaze, with a multi-colored iridescent patina over the glaze, and a high degree of eye appeal. This Greek kantharos is a Classic Period type vessel, as can be seen with the two looped handles and the long stemmed base, and this piece is also classified as being a "Type A" type due to this design. This type of piece is also seen on many Greek Classical Period coins and painted ceramics. This type of vessel was used for drinking wine at drinking parties which is known as a "symposium", and was also used for ceremonial offerings. This superb and beautiful piece is intact, and has some spotty white calcite deposits seen in various sections of the piece, and is heavy at the inner bottom of the vessel. There is also some minor roughness seen in sections of the inner bowl, otherwise this piece is in near flawless condition. This piece also have a deep even black glaze seen on the inner and outer surfaces, and there are no pressure cracks and/or repair seen anywhere on this vessel. (Another analogous example was offered at Christie's Antiquities, London, Oct. 2011, no. 71. This piece was approximately 11 inches high, with a faint painted white ivy tendril that runs around the main body of the vessel. $4,600.00-$7,500.00 estimates, $9,246.00 realized.) (Another analogous example can be seen in the Louvre Museum, Paris, Inv. no. MNC 670, and bears an incised inscription that is a sacred dedication. The lengthy inscription is in the Boeotian alphabet, and this vessel is thought to have come from Thespiae.) The attractive piece offered here is scarce to rare in this intact condition, and is seldom offered on the market. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #594153
Apolonia Ancient Art
$385.00
This attractive piece is a Greek terracotta amphora that dates circa 1100-700 B.C., and is Sub-Mycenaean (Iron Age I & II). This light red terracotta is intact and has nice heavy white calcite deposits seen within the vessel. There are also spotty white calcite deposits seen on the outside surface and the inner surface has traces of root marking. This piece was probably used a table ware vessel and is approximately 4.6 inches high. The design of this piece also follows earlier Minoan pottery forms, and the piece offered here may pre-date circa 1100 B.C. as well. There are also circular imprints seen on the flat base, and the main body of this piece was created on a potter's wheel, which also makes this piece one of the earliest Greek pottery types created in this fashion. A nice intact vessel with good eye appeal. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1276518
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This piece is a scarce Greek Mycenaean bronze double-ax head that dates circa 1400-1200 B.C. This piece is approximately 6.3 inches long, by 2.25 inches high near the end of each blade. This piece is very solid, as it was cast as one piece, and because of it's heavy weight, it was well served as a heavy battle ax. This piece also had added strength, as the inner shank design is "V" shaped, and is not a round circle as most examples of this type have. This "V" designed inner shank provided for added strength relative to it's attachment to the shaft, and this design made this a powerful weapon, as this design gave added leverage to the warrior while striking a blow. This design also points to the fact that this piece was likely made for battle, rather than being made purely as a votive object after the death of the warrior. However, there is a strong possibility that this piece not only may have served in battle, but it was also used as a votive offering as well. This weapon was the principle weapon of the Mycenaean Greeks and was probably used during the Trojan War. This type of bronze weapon is also scarce to rare, because bronze during this period was very valuable, and bronze objects that were damaged and/or had lost their utility were often melted down into another bronze weapon or object. The shape of this heavy battle ax may have originated in Crete with the Minoan culture, circa 2000 B.C., as double-ax head weapons and plaques have been excavated at Knossos. This shape may also refer to the Minoan bull-jumping cult, as the ends of the double-ax may have represented the horns of the bull. A number of votive gold double-axes, found in Arkalochori in Crete, are of the same shape as the example offered here. This piece has a beautiful dark green/blue patina with some heavy dark green/brown mineral deposits, and is in mint to superb "as found" condition with no breaks. This piece also has a relatively sharp blade edge, and there is little or no wear over the entire piece. For the type see "Greek, Etruscan, and Roman Bronzes in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston", by M. Comstock and C. Vermeule III, 1971, no. 1630. The example offered here is very analogous to the example sold in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2002, no. 18. ($5,000.00-$8,000.00 estimates, $5,975.00 realized. See attached photo.) Another example was offered by Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, for $7500.00. (See the exhibit catalog "Venerable Traditions", published Nov. 2007, no. 26. See attached photo.) Another example was also offered by Charles Ede Ltd., London, published in Greek Antiquities, 2006, no. 37. (4,000.00 Pound estimate.) The attractive piece offered here sits on a custom display stand, and can easily lift off. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, circa 2000-2014. Inv.# P33-039-101514c. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1333494
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This little gem is a Greek Attic black-glazed kantharos that dates circa 350-325 B.C. This piece is approximately 2.4 inches high, by 4.6 inches wide from handle to handle. This charming piece is intact, and is in mint quality condition with no repair/restoration. The lustrous black glaze is even around the vessel, and is seen both on the inner and outer surfaces. This piece has a "flat handled" design, and these handles have spurred edges, a looping design, and connect to the main body of the vessel. This piece sits on a torus foot, and there is no reserve underneath, as this piece is entirely covered in a black glaze. This dainty piece was also designed to imitate silver vessels of this type. This type of Attic black-glazed ceramic is also scarce to rare on the market, as it is a rare form. This piece has some spotty white calcite deposits, and a multi-colored iridescent patina. (Another analogous vessel of this type was offered by Charles Ede Limited, London, 2010, Catalog 182, no. 35 for 900.00 pounds.) For the type see, B. Sparkes and L. Talcott, "The Athenian Agora, Vol. XII, Black and Plain Pottery", Princeton, 1970, no. 701, fig. 7. Ex: Private U.K collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv. #091613-05. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1321881
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This attractive ancient Greek coin is a Sikyon silver stater that dates circa 350-330 B.C. This coin is approximately 23 mm wide, weighs 11.8 gms, and is in good very fine/extremely fine condition (VF+/EF). This coin also has a light gray patina, perfect centering, and excellent metal, with some minute roughness seen mostly on the high relief sections of the obverse and reverse. This attractive coin features on the obverse the mythical creature Chimaera, facing left, with the letter "I" seen below the belly of the creature that is seen standing/walking on a ground line. The reverse features a dove flying left, with the letter "N" below the beak; all within a laurel wreath. The Chimaera was a celebrated monster who sprung from the union of Echidna and Typhon, and had three heads; those of a lion, a goat, and a dragon. The Greek hero Bellerophon with the support of Minerva, and the aid of the winged horse Pegasus, attacked and killed the Chimaera in an epic battle. The image of Chimaera, seen on the obverse of this coin, has a goat neck and head rising from it's back, and the head and body of a lion. The city of Sikyon chose this creature as a civic symbol, and is one of the few known images of this creature seen on ancient Greek coinage. This coin type is also highly desirable among collectors of ancient Greek coinage who collect coins that illustrate creatures known from ancient Greek myth. References: BMC 57. SNG Copenhagen 48. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, circa 1980's. I certify that this coin is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: