Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1322070
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This flawless piece is a Greek red ware pyxis that dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 4th-early 3rd century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.85 inches in diameter at the lid and lower base, and 4 inches high. This piece is in flawless condition, and has no repair and/or restoration. Vessels of this type are scarce to rare in this mint condition, as the lid and base have thin edges that extend away from the main body of the piece. The lid fits very close to the supporting lower base, and lifts easily on and off the base. The lid also has a roundel seen at the top that may have had a bone, metal, or stone insert with a carved image. A nearly identical vessel of the same size with a terracotta image of a goddess, seen within the roundel at the top, was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, Vol. XXVI, no. 118. ($5,000.00 estimate. See attached photo.) The piece offered here also has some spotty light brown earthen, and minute black mineral deposits. A scarce vessel in this mint condition. Ex: Charles Ede collection, London, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1337548
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,875.00
This impressive piece is a Graeco-Roman Hellenistic silver necklace that dates circa 2nd century B.C.-1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 21 inches in length, and is made from several interwoven strands of silver in an intricate design, resulting in a massive thick chain that is approximately .4 inches in diameter. This intricate silver piece also has two cylindrical terminals that cap each end of the chain, each decorated with looped band enclosures with raised "wire-rope" pattern designs. The "wire-rope" pattern design is also a Greek Hellenistic convention of art that is seen on ancient Greek gold and silver jewelry for the period. The two cylindrical terminals in turn connect to a bronze clasp that securely closes the necklace on the wearer. There is also a central movable pendant that has applied dots and an additional raised "wire-rope" pattern. The central movable pendant may also have framed a carved gem or perhaps an ancient coin. This piece could have only been owned by a wealthy individual in antiquity, as it has an extremely high degree of workmanship and was made from a very valuable material. This piece was also very impressive in antiquity, as it has a very high degree of eye appeal, and as such, was likely worn by a woman who wanted to impress her peers. There is an ancient repair on the right side of the chain, and this may have been broken and repaired due to civil unrest. Another near identical example of this piece is the example offered in Christie's Antiquities, London, Oct. 2006, no. 62. (3,500.00-5,500.00 Pounds estimates.) The Christie's example cited above is also from the same collection as the piece offered here, and in addition, both of these pieces may have been produced in the same workshop. Both of these silver pieces are also analogous to the example seen in "Ancient Gold: The Wealth of the Thracians" by I. Marazov, New York, 1998, p. 117, no. 36. The beautiful piece offered here may also be easily worn today with some minor restoration, and a carved gem or coin can easily be added into the central hoop. This piece is also an exceptional collectable as an ancient piece of jewelry, and is an important collectable as is. This piece also has an attractive dark gray patina, and the bronze hoop also has an attractive dark green patina. A custom display necklace case is also included. Ex: Private German collection, Krefeld, Germany, circa 1970's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1119822
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This cute piece is a Greco-Roman bronze that is in the form of a bull's head, and this piece dates circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 1.5 inches high by 2 inches wide, and weighs approximately 122.5 gms. This piece is a weight that was designed for a steelyard weight scale, which was a bar that was suspended by a chain that acted as a swivel, and this bar had a chain suspended tray at each end. The scarce weight offered here was simply placed on one of the trays, as this weight was designed with a flat bottom and this piece stands upright. This piece also has a hole that runs through the middle of the neck, and a bar/chain could have also suspended this weight on the steelyard scale bar as well. This attractive piece has floppy ears, almond shaped eyes, and cropped horns. The horns could have also been cropped in antiquity in order to conform this weight to a specific weight of 122.5 gms. This piece also has a beautiful dark blue-green patina, with some dark blue and light brown surface deposits, which lends this attractive a high degree of eye appeal. This piece sits on a custom plexiglas display stand that is also included. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1315451
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This large and impressive piece is a Greek bronze horse that dates to the Geometric Period, circa 8th century B.C. This exceptional and large example is approximately 3.4 inches high, by 3.65 inches long. This complete piece is in superb condition, with no cracks and/or breaks, and the overall surface is very even with a beautiful dark green patina. There is some dark green/brown mineral deposits seen mostly on the bottom side of the base plate, and overall, this piece has a great deal of eye appeal due to it's beautiful dark green patina and even surfaces. This esoteric piece is designed with an elongated tail and legs, which are attached to the base plate that has ten triangular openings. The triangular openings in the base plate arranged into two rows, along with the base plate extension to accommodate for the attachment of the tail, stylistically point to a "Laconian" manufacture. (See another analogous "Laconian" example in "Glories of the Past: Ancient Art from the Shelby White and Leon Levy Collection", Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1990, no. 72.) The piece offered here also has a tubular designed torso and elongated nose, and the elongated nose has two raised mounds seen just in front of the ears that represent the eyes of the horse. The type of horse seen here may be the "Laconian Type" for the reasons noted above, but there are also no knobs seen on the legs that represent knee joints, and this type of design is seen mostly on the "Thessalian Type". The type of Greek geometric bronze horse offered here, with the openwork integral plinths, were votive offerings in the Geometric Period, and are found widespread throughout the ancient Greek world. However, large examples in the superb condition offered here are quite rare, and not often have the beautiful deep emerald green patina that is seen on this exceptional example. (Another analogous example of the same size and condition was also offered in Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2012, no. 61., $40,000.00-$60,000.00 estimates, $50,000.00 realized. See attached photo.) This beautiful piece also sits on a custom display stand. A large example, with great surfaces and a beautiful dark green patina, which together make this exceptional piece one of the finest examples available on the market today. Ex: Private English collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1243639
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,865.00
This massive and extremely rare piece is a Greek iron sarissa spear head that dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 4th century B.C., and is approximately 22.5 inches long by 2 inches wide at the blades mid point. This piece is intact, and is in superb condition with a hardened earthen over glaze which has helped to preserve this extremely rare iron weapon. The metal seen on this piece is for the most part very compact with very little flaking, and is in very stable and solid condition. The condition of this piece is remarkable, given the fact that it is made from iron, and not bronze. This piece is all the more remarkable, in that it has survived intact after sustaining substantial battle damage. This battle damage can be seen with the two bends in the blade, and a small part of the end of the shank which was moved out from the blow to the piece. The blow to the piece traveled from the tip end to the shank, and did not shatter the weapon, as the blow appears to have been on the side of the blade, thus causing the two bends in the blade and the small section at the end of the shank to move out and expand. This piece was likely carried by an infrantryman, and was fitted to a wooded shaft about 12-15 feet long. This heavy lance was carried with two hands, and is known as a "sarissa". This type of weapon was also developed by Philip II, who was the father of Alexander the Great, and was king of Macedonia circa 359-336 B.C. His military genius transformed his army with many innovative weapons and battle tactics, and the weapon offered here was one such weapon. The finest weapons during the Hellenistic period were iron, rather than bronze, and were forged and hand beaten into shape. These iron weapons were extremely sharp and durable, and iron swords from this period could easily take off a mans arm at the shoulder, and penetrate bronze shields. The fact that the piece offered here did not shatter during battle proves that this piece was hammered again, and again, to give it strength and durability. (For the Hellenistic Greek weapon types see "Greece and Rome at War", by Peter Connolly, United Kingdom, 1998.) This piece is extremely rare and is seldom seen in this condition on today's market. This piece comes with a custom metal stand and stands upright. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1363891
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,865.00
This scarce piece is a Greek silver cup that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 4th-3rd century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.9 inches high, by 4.65 inches in diameter at the upper rim. This beautiful piece has a flat bottom, and easily stands by itself. This attractive piece also has a slightly flared rim, and graduates in size down to the flat base, and overall, this piece has a very esoteric shape and a high degree of eye appeal. This vessel also has a light to dark gray patina with some attractive spotty light gray mineral deposits. These attractive mineral deposits are not only a mark of authenticity, but they also show that this piece has not been over cleaned, and is in it's natural "as found" condition. There is also some minute root marking and scratches, which is normal for a vessel of this type, and there is no repair/restoration. This piece may also have been produced in ancient Thrace, and may also have been produced for the Scythian market. For the type see: D.E. Strong in "Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate", London, 1966, pp. 84-86. The piece offered here is scarce to rare, and overall, is a superb example seldom seen in this condition on the market. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #994533
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This piece is an extremely large Greek bronze bowl that dates circa 5th-4th century B.C. This exceptionally large piece is approximately 13.2 inches in diameter by 4.2 inches high, and has a superb dark green patina with light green and blue hues. This piece is intact and has no repair/restoration, and is in mint "as found" condition. This piece has two concentric circles that run around the main body of the vessel, and three concentric circles are seen within the raised base ring. These concentric circles are often seen on ancient Greek vessels that date from the 5th to the 4th century B.C. The metal is very thick on this piece, and this piece does have some noticable weight to it, and is somewhat heavy as it is approximately 4.8 pounds. This piece has a thick rounded rim, and this allows one to easily lift this piece with a solid grip. There are also no handles attached to the main body, and there is no indication that there were handles that were ever attached to this piece. This type of large vessel with no handles was made to hold wine and/or water for the table or bath, and was often placed on a raised stand. (For this type of vessel, see "Vergina, The Royal Tombs" by Manolis Andronicos, Ekdotike Athenon Pub., Athens, 1984.) This vessel may also have been made for heated water, and may have been used to cool the heated water for the bath, given the thickness of the metal. This piece is rare in this size and is a beautiful example with a high degree of eye appeal. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1259952
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,465.00
This scarce coin is a silver tetradrachm that was minted in the name of Alexander the Great, circa 311-305 B.C. This coin is approximately 26 mm in diameter, weighs 17.1 grams, is perfectly centered, and is in about extremely fine/extremely fine condition: EF-/EF. This piece also has attractive old cabinet toning, and has an even light gray patina. The obverse has the head of Herakles facing right, wearing a lion's skin headdress, and the obverse is seen in extremely high relief. The obverse has superb artistic style, and the eye of Herakles is seen wide open and is slightly upturned. This is a Greek Hellenistic convention of art that also is meant to portray a deified god, and the portrait seen here may also represent Alexander the Great in the guise of Herakles. The reverse has a seated Zeus facing left, holding an eagle in his extended right arm, with the name of "Alexander" seen behind, and "King" below in Greek lettering. In addition, there is a monogram seen below the throne that is seen within a victory wreath, and the letters "MI" are seen before the throne with a symbol seen below. This symbol represents a type of scythe known as a "grape picker", and this weapon was used on a long pole in order to attack cavalry by slashing and pulling down the rider from his horse. This type of weapon was especially effective against heavy armored riders, who removed from their mounts, could then easily be dispatched by an infantryman. This symbol is extremely rare, with only one recorded example by Martin Price in "The Coinage in the Name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus", The British Museum, 1991. Price also classified this coin as being from the "MI" series, Babylon Mint, circa 311-305 B.C., nos. 3745-3775. The coin offered here is analogous to no. 3768, which is listed as having a "sickle" symbol. This symbol is extremely rare relative to ancient Greek numismatics, and the coin offered here, and the Price example may be the only two recorded examples. In addition, Nancy Waggoner in "The Alexander Mint at Babylon", Columbia University, 1968, thought that the "MI" series, denoted by the "MI" letters seen on the reverse, was a result in a change in the mint personnel at Babylon with the resumption of power there by Seleucus I, circa 311 B.C. Seleucus I gained power in Babylon by wrestling control of Babylon from Antigonos I Monophthalmos, and finally defeating him at the battle of Ipsos circa 301 B.C. The coin offered here may in fact be the first coin issue minted by Seleucus I, and it is interesting to note that the symbols seen on the "MI" series are military in nature, and some of these symbols include a "double-ax", a "ship's prow", and a "spearhead". The "MI" letters are also seen on several subsequent regal coin issues of Seleucus I after circa 305 B.C. The coin offered here is an Alexander the Great type that is seldom seen on the market with the symbols attributed to Seleucus I, and was an issue that helped to secure Seleucus I as "King of Asia". Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1363639
Apolonia Ancient Art
$325.00
This interesting Greek bronze coin is a Tarsos (AE 26mm), and dates circa 164-27 B.C. This coin is approximately 27 mm wide, weighs 16.3 gms, and is in very fine/good very fine condition (VF/VF+). This coin is also scarce regardless of grade, and overall, this coin is a better example than what is usually seen, and in addition, this coin has a beautiful even dark green patina. The obverse (Obv.) features a seated Tyche on a chair facing right, holding a grain ear, and below, the river god Kydnos is swimming right. The reverse (Rev.) features Zeus Nikephoros seated on a throne facing left, and is holding a Nike with a magistrates legend seen below the extended arm. The Greek legend (TARSOS) is also seen behind the detailed throne. The design of the seated Zeus and throne also copies the earlier coins of Alexander the Great, and the seated Tyche seen on the obverse is also a scarce depiction in ancient Greek coinage. Tyche was the patron goddess of Tarsos, and was easily recognized in antiquity as such, and this is also an explanation why this coin has no obverse legend. A nice Greek bronze with a beautiful dark green patina. References: Sear 5674; SNG Levante 979. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #956245
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865.00
These three pieces are being offered as one lot, as they are made from the same light red/tan clay fabric, and have similar light tan earthern deposits that have minute root marking. These three intact pieces are all classified as being Greek Corinthian, and date circa mid 6th century B.C. The first piece is an aryballos, that is approximately 2.25 inches high. This petite piece has some dark brown design elements that are seen at the rounded base, and is in superb condition, save for some unobtrusive chips that are seen below the lip. The second piece is a thin walled skyphos, that is approximately 3.1 inches high by 6 inches wide handle to handle. This piece is also in superb condition, save for a minute chip at the base that may be from antiquity. The third piece is a exaleiptron, otherwise known as a "kothon" or "cothon", which was used as a funerary ritual vessel that contained aromatic oil. This piece is also in superb condition, save for a minute chip at the end of one of the two handle flares. This vessel has a low foot ring and has traces of geometric light brown painted line design under the earthern deposits. All three of the superb vessels offered here may have been used in a votive funerary ritual as well, and are scarce in this "as found" condition. Corinthian vessels, such as the three examples offered here, were also exported throughout the ancient Greek world during the 6th century B.C., and competed for markets with ancient Greek Attic ceramics. An interesting group that is being offered as one lot. Ex: Arte Primitivo, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1265926
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This scarce to rare coin is a Greek gold Quarter Stater attributed to Philip II, circa 323-315 B.C. This coin is approximately 12mm wide, weighs 1.91 gms, and is in superb condition which is (EF+/EF). This attractive coin shows a well defined Herakles head facing right, seen in high relief within a dotted border. The Herakles head is seen wearing a lion's skin headdress which has well defined detail, and is also well centered on the flan. The reverse shows a "au-dessus de l'arc" symbol above, a stringed bow, Greek lettering in the name of "Philip", a Herakles club, and a trident symbol which are all grouped on the reverse. The lettering and the symbols are also slightly double truck in sections, and the flan is slightly cupped. There are some minute minor excavation marks and root marking seen mainly on the reverse, and this coin is in much better condition than most examples of this coin, as the majority of specimens are in very fine (VF) condition and have a shallow relief die on the obverse. This piece also has a nice patina, with some spotty mint luster. This coin matches die set D-84/R-59, no. 129, which is seen in "Le Monnayage D'Argent Et D'Or De Philippe II" by Georges Le Rider, Paris, 1977. La Rider also classifies this coin as being in his "Group III", minted in the Pella Mint, and having a reverse type that shows the "au-dessus de l'arc" and trident symbols together in combination. There are fewer examples of this coin type seen in "Group III", as compared to the numerous examples and die combinations seen in "Group II". This coin is still a scarce coin type even for "Group II", and is rarer for "Group III". The reason for this is that the prior group was minted during the lifetime of Alexander the Great, who continued to mint this type after the death of his father, Philip II, circa 336 B.C. The coin offered here began to be minted for a short time after the death of Alexander the Great, circa 323 B.C., and this is why this type is a scarce to rare issue. The minting techniques of this attractive coin also changed, with the flans of "Group II" being more concave, and are generally seen with a circular line that runs around the perimeter of the flan and frames the symbols and lettering seen on the reverse. The coin offered here does not have the circular line on the reverse as noted above, and has no dotted border seen on the reverse as well. This fractional denomination is also much more rarer than the larger gold staters from the same period, as this fractional coin type was only minted when a large amount of metal was available, which allowed for the minting of additional denominations such as this quarter stater. An exceptional coin that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Harlan Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1326070
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This nice Greek vessel is a silver kantharos that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 2nd-1st century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.5 inches high, by 5.4 inches wide from handle to handle. This rare piece has a dark gray patina with dark brown highlights, has not been over cleaned, and has natural surfaces. This piece was made from five separate parts: the main hand beaten body of the piece, two cast handles, a ring base, and a round base tubular extension. The main body of the piece also has an attractive volute pattern that runs around the main body of the vessel, and several hand punched dots that are seen running around the base of the rim. This piece is intact, and has some limited repair, with only the secure reattachment of the handles and footed base which appears to have been done some time ago. There are three short and visual stress cracks that are seen running down from the upper rim into the main body of the piece that are about .3 inches, but other than that, this piece is a superb example that is intact, and is a solid example. These cracks were likely the result of ground pressure, and also point to the authenticity of the vessel. The overall design of this esoteric Greek vessel is rare, especially with the volute pattern and the "flat handles" that are normally seen on subsequent Roman period vessels. A silver vessel kantharos cup seen in "Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate", by D.E. Strong, London, 1966, p. 114, dating from the second century B.C., has analogous "flat handles" as the vessel offered here, and is described as having two "long horizontal thumb grips". This piece featured by D.E. Strong is now seen in the National Hermitage Museum, Leningrad, and is also described as being a "Greek vessel with elaborate ornament". The Greek vessel offered here may also be among the first vessels of this type with a "flat handle" design, and was the Greek prototype for the subsequent Roman period silver kantharos type cups that had this analogous "flat handle" design. The piece offered here not only is a rare example that has an esoteric design, but it also has superb eye appeal and is one of the best recorded examples. Ex: Private Austrian collection circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1277641
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This sensual and appealing piece is a Greek Attic column krater that dates circa 460 B.C. This Attic "red-figure" piece is approximately 10.8 inches high, by 9.9 inches wide at the top from handle to handle. This piece has also been attributed to the "Florence Painter", who was one of the better Greek Attic painters who used gestures and facial expression to portray emotion. This piece shows three standing young men on "Side A", and two facing and standing young men on "Side B". The three young men on "Side A" are all seen interacting with one another, and the figure on the left appears to reach out and help balance the amphora that the central figure is carrying to the right. The figure on the right appears to walk towards the central figure, and is watching his progress. The entire scene conveys movement, and is an every day scene that perhaps would be lived out in "Classical Period" Athens. The central figure seen carrying the amphora, perhaps used for water or wine, is seen with his upper torso designed with a three-quarter design that is opened to the viewer. His cloak is also seen open at the center, which conveys an erotic and sensual view of his nude body which the figure on the right is closely admiring as well. All of the other figures seen on this piece are fully cloaked, and the semi-nude central figure on "Side A" truly stands out in the composition. In addition, his hair is seen "free flowing" down from his red wreathed brow, and this hair design adds to the sensual nature of this piece. "Side B" also shows a scene where one young man is offering another a drink, and perhaps both scenes on this vessel portray and refer to a public celebration. The young man receiving the drink also appears to be surprised for the drink offering. The eye design seen on the five figures of this lovely piece are also very analogous to the contemporary "Niobid Painter", as are the faces that have rounded chins and eternally young faces. (See "Attic Red-Figure Pottery" by Robert Folsom, Noyes Classical Studies, 1976, p. 175, Fig. A30, for a drawing of an eye design attributed to the Niobid Painter.) This piece also has a delicately painted "ivy leaf and floral pattern" design painted within a box that is seen on the raised neck of "Side A". There is also an added detailed "black acorn pattern" seen running around the top lip, with an attractive black "acanthus pattern" seen above each handle as well. This piece is in mint to superb condition, and is intact with no noticeable repair/restoration, save a minor stress crack seen on the main body on Side B, and a possible small pie shaped section within the ring base that may have been repaired and/or restored. This piece also has vibrant orange/red, black, and red colors. There are heavy white calcite deposits seen mostly on the inside of the vessel, and on the outer upper third of the vessel, and overall, this intact piece is in it's natural "as found" condition. An exceptional erotic type vessel that not only has a great deal of eye appeal, but was also created by a scarce painter that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1340042
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This complete piece is a Greek silver neck section for a vessel, and dates circa 5th-4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 4 inches diameter, by 2.8 inches high. This piece is slightly oval in shape, and has slightly sloping sides. This piece has exceptional workmanship, and was hammered into shape from one solid sheet of silver. In addition, this piece has an extremely detailed beaded lip border, with minute beading which only a skilled artist could have produced. This piece was made as a section for a large silver vessel such as a hydria, or a stamnos, and both of these vessel types had an extended neck that reached upwards from the main body of the vessel, along with handles that were attached to the main body of the vessel. This pieced may also have been produced for fitting into a ceramic vessel body, and although this is rare, it is a known type of use. This piece likely was never used, and could have been made as a votive type use, and was never intended for use in real life. This piece also could have been produced for use into a silver vessel at a later time, as was perhaps lost in the production process, or became war booty that was hoarded away. Whatever the case, this piece is a rare example as a section such as this, and is an excellent case study as to how a complete silver vessel could have been produced. This piece also appears to be a complete neck section, with no apparent cut marks showing in the lower edge, although there is some lower edge roughness that is to be expected. This piece also has an attractive dark to light gray patina, and there are some sections that have spotty dark to light black mineral deposits, along with some additional minute mineralization and root marking. This type of piece is seldom seen on the market, and is an exceptional example for the type. This piece also sits on a custom metal and Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Private New Jersey collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #594153
Apolonia Ancient Art
$385.00
This attractive piece is a Greek terracotta amphora that dates circa 1100-700 B.C., and is Sub-Mycenaean (Iron Age I & II). This light red terracotta is intact and has nice heavy white calcite deposits seen within the vessel. There are also spotty white calcite deposits seen on the outside surface and the inner surface has traces of root marking. This piece was probably used a table ware vessel and is approximately 4.6 inches high. The design of this piece also follows earlier Minoan pottery forms, and the piece offered here may pre-date circa 1100 B.C. as well. There are also circular imprints seen on the flat base, and the main body of this piece was created on a potter's wheel, which also makes this piece one of the earliest Greek pottery types created in this fashion. A nice intact vessel with good eye appeal. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1323767
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This extremely fine coin is a silver drachm that was minted shortly after the death of Alexander the Great circa 323 B.C. This coin was likely minted circa 323-310 B.C. in Colophon, or possibly Abydus, and the identifying mint mark is the Macedonian royal star burst symbol that is seen on the reverse, at the front of the seated Zeus. This coin is in extremely fine condition (EF/EF-), and is approximately 20mm in diameter, weighs 4.3 gms (Attic Weight Standard), and has a very light gray patina. The obverse features a bust of Herakles facing right, and is seen wearing a lion's skin headdress. The portrait seen here is also a very close likeness of Alexander the Great, and was likely intended to portray both Herakles and Alexander. The reverse features a seated Zeus, who is seen holding a standing eagle which was a messenger of the gods. The Macedonian star burst symbol is seen at the front of the seated Zeus, and the name (Philip) in Greek lettering is seen behind. The flan of this attractive piece is very large, and one can see the edge line of the die that runs around the outer edge of the obverse. The flan of this piece is larger than what one normally sees relative to this issue, and this coin also has perfect centering, along with extremely high relief on the obverse. The large flan size alone makes this coin a superb example, and is not often seen on the market. In addition, the seated Zeus does not have crossed legs and has an analogous design as the specimens attributed to Abydus show, and the Macedonian royal star is often seen on examples attributed to Colophon, according to Martin Price. References: This extremely rare coin has an example listed in Price, no. P113, and is listed as "minted circa 323-280 B.C.", and as "Uncertain of Western Asia Minor". It may also be that this rare issue may have been minted in Pergamon, shortly after the death of Alexander the Great, as this was the center of the so-called "Royalist" faction that supported the royal family after the death of Alexander. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1357958
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This exceptional piece is a Greek/Scythian iron short sword that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 3rd-2nd century B.C. This attractive iron weapon is larger than most examples, and is approximately 12.9 inches high, by 3.5 inches wide at the hilt which is in the middle section of the piece. This scarce iron piece is dark brown, and has some spotty light brown highlights. This piece was also hand forged from iron, and is a "four-part construction" type piece. This piece is made up with a "V-shaped blade", a "decorative curved hilt", a "handle bar", and a "pommel end bar" that has a single rivet that holds it onto the "handle bar". This rivet is made from a section of the "handle bar" that fitted through the "pommel end bar", and was hammered down over the "pommel end bar" which holds it in place. The "decorative curved hilt" is identical on each side of the piece, and it gives a very esoteric look to the piece as well. The overall construction is very solid, and this piece is a very durable weapon. The "V-shaped blade" also has hammered "blood lines" down the center, and this strengthened the "V-shaped blade" and allowed for a tight fit in a scabbard. There is also a grooved "slot" seen on one side of the "handle bar", and this likely held a wooden or bone handle into place that was fitted over the "handle bar". The condition of this piece is superb to mint quality, and is one of the best recorded iron examples of this type of weapon. The surface has some minor pitting from hammering and wear, and the piece was conditioned by a major museum in Germany. This piece has no repair/restoration, and there is some minute fill at the extreme tip end, which has also prevented the tip from breaking off. This piece is of the type that has been found in ancient Thrace, and the region around the Black Sea. Overall, an exceptional large example with excellent preservation and metal quality. This piece also sits on a custom metal display stand. Another analogous example was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, 2017, No. HM1102. (This Royal Athena Galleries piece is nearly the same length as the piece offered here, 11.25 inches long, and has some wear and losses. The Royal Athena piece is also offered at $7500.00. See attached photo.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1304461
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This group of Greco-Roman ceramics date circa 4th century B.C.-1st century A.D. All of these pieces are intact, and have no restoration/repair. This group are mainly household type wares, and this group has: (1) Greek blackware skyphos, approximately 7 inches wide from handle to handle, by 2 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (1) Greek Apulian dish, approximately 4.2 inches in diameter, by 1.5 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (2) Greek Apulian blackware lekythos, approximately 3.2 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (1) Greek aryballos brown/black bottle, approximately 3.4 inches high, circa 3rd-2nd century B.C. (1) Greek footed red ware olpe, approximately 3.5 inches high, circa 4th-3rd century B.C. (1) Roman red terracotta oil lamp, circa 1st century A.D. This group is a nice collection with a wide variety of types and shapes. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1990's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition: