Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1251135
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This beautiful piece is a Near Eastern gold brooch that dates circa 2nd-4th century B.C. This complete piece is approximately 1.75 inches long, by 1.25 inches wide, by .6 inches deep. This piece is attributed to being Parthian, or possibly Sasanian, but this type of piece has also been found in ancient Baktria which had Greek artisans. This piece was likely part of a necklace, and a complete necklace may have been made up of several of these pieces, or may have served as the central medallion/component. A complete necklace is seen in the British Museum, and is attributed to being Parthian, circa 2nd century B.C.-2nd century A.D. This complete necklace has a central component which is very analogous in design and size to the piece offered here. This complete necklace is also published in "Art of the Ancient Near and Middle East", by Carel J. Du Ry, Abrams Pub., New York, 1969, p. 159. (See attached photo.) The piece offered here is made of a central plate, with added granular gold triangle designs that run around the centered white and dark brown banded agate stone. The attractive agate stone has a rounded oval front and flat back side, and this stone is mounted with an extended gold metal band that runs upward from the flat plate. There is also a minute twisted gold band seen on the outer edge of this piece, and another minute twisted gold band is seen around the centered stone as well. The workmanship of this piece is very fine, as each minute granular gold ball was added into the triangular designs, and this piece likely belonged to a wealthy individual in antiquity. The piece offered here is in superb condition, and is an exceptional example for the type. Near Eastern gold jewelry pieces of this type are scarce to rare, and are seldom seen on the market. This piece also hangs from a custom Plexiglas display stand. Another analogous example of a slightly smaller size is also seen in the British Museum, and is published in "Schmuck aus Drei Jahrtausenden", no. 61, p. 51. (See attached photo.) Ex: David and Henry Anavian collection, New York, circa 1960's-1970's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1163826
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This beautiful piece is a Sasanian cut glass bowl that dates circa 5th-6th century A.D. This piece is approximately 3.25 inches high by 3.8 inches in diameter, and is slightly larger than most examples of this type. This mint quality exceptional piece also has one of the best patinas seen on a vessel of this type, and has a thick honey brown encrusted patina that is seen over a pale green glass, and there are attractive spotty dark brown and black mineral deposits seen on the outer surface. This thick-walled piece has seven registers that run around the vessel from top to bottom, and there is one large circle at the bottom that forms the base. The top five registers have a "diamond-cut" pattern, and the bottom two registers have a "circular-cut" pattern. The entire vessel was cut from one solid block of glass, and was skillfully cut with the patterns that are seen on the outer surface of the vessel. The patterns are all nearly the same size, and a great deal of skill was required to produce a cut vessel of this type. A much higher degree of skill was needed to produce a cut vessel of this type, relative to the numerous Roman blown glass vessels. In addition, this beautiful piece is rarer than the more common examples that entirely have "circular-cut" pattern registers, as opposed to this rarer vessel that has "diamond-cut" pattern registers. A slightly smaller analogous Sasanian bowl was offered in Christie's Antiquities, London, April 2012, no. 396 (L4,500.00-L6,700.00 pounds estimates, L5,000.00 pounds realized.) An analogous bowl of this type and size is seen in the Shosoin shrine in Nara, Japan, and was an early export from Sasanian Persia to East Asia (See P.O. Harper, "The Royal Hunter; Art of the Sasanian Empire, New york, 1977, p. 159, no.82.). One of the finest vessels of it's type, as it is in a mint "as found" condition with a thick honey-colored mineralized patina. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #883507
Apolonia Ancient Art
$365.00
This Near Eastern piece is an attractive red carnelian stamp seal that is from the Sassanian culture that lived in modern day Iran. This piece dates circa 2nd-4th century A.D., and served as a personal signet stamp seal which was used to conduct business transactions. This piece has a flat face and has a bow drilled hole in the center, and this piece was probably worn on a cord around the neck. This piece is fragmentary with about half of the piece missing, but the flat face with the seal is intact. The flat face of this piece has an exceptional engraved portrait bust of a bearded noble, who is seen wearing a regal diadem in the hair, and this piece was probably owned by a wealthy individual who traded within the Sassanian Empire. The fine artistic style seen on this piece is better than most examples for the period, and the color is very striking, as the stone has a deep red color. This piece would make an excellent addition to a ring or a pendant. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Ltd., Chicago, Ill. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Metalwork : Pre AD 1000 item #1247108
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,865.00
These two superb bronze plaques are attributed to the Ordos culture, and date circa 5th-3rd century B.C. These two pieces are approximately 4.25 inches long by 2.3 inches high, and have an attractive dark brown/black patina with gold gilt and dark red highlights. There is also some minute root marking seen mostly on the back side of each piece, and there is some dark green mineralization seen in sections of each piece as well. Both pieces have very little wear, were likely votive, and were both cast from the lost-wax process, while the wax model was formed in a two-piece mold. These pieces were made as a matching pair, and were possibly attached to a wooden sarcophagus, a burial garment, or the most likely, a leather belt. This type of piece is usually found in pairs, which may also tie in with the "master of the animals" cult that was associated with many cultures in the ancient Near East circa 1000-100 B.C. These plaques are attributed to the Ordos culture, which was located in modern day Eastern Mongolia and Southern Siberia. Most Ordos bronzes of this type can also be associated with the Xiongnu, who were a Mongolian steppes nomadic tribe that had to contend with the Chinese during the Han period. The term "Ordos bronzes" has been applied rather indiscriminately to all "animal style" objects found in the vast northern border areas with China, irrespective of place of discovery or dating. What is known is that the two plaques offered here stylistically match other examples found in Eastern Mongolia and Southern Siberia. For the type see "Nomadic Art of the Eastern Eurasian Steppes: The Eugene V. Thaw and Other New York Collections", Yale University Press, 2002. The pieces offered here show a standing animal which resembles a wolf, which is seen devouring it's prey, which appears to be a horned ibex. The horned ibex is seen with it's head in the mouth of the wolf, and it's curved horn is seen on the ground, as head of the ibex is seen turned around with a twisted elongated neck. In addition, the ibex may be a young baby animal, which may also explain the size difference between both the ibex and the wolf, but in reality, the ibex portrayed on these plaques may be an adult animal, and the carnivorous wolf may have been designed in an oversized manner to portray a more powerful creature. The wolf may also represent a "spirit animal" and may not be a wolf, but rather a creature that somewhat resembles a wolf or a feline. The creature portrayed here has a curled tail like a feline, and an elongated snout like a wolf, and the creature seen here may be a combination of both animals. The ibex head can also be best seen with the entire piece being viewed upside down, which is a convention of art that is common to the Ordos culture. (See attached close up photo.) This piece also has an attachment hook seen in the top center of the wolf's back, a small hole seen in the tip of the tail, and another hole designed within the ibex horn and front leg. These were the three points as to how this piece could have been attached to a leather belt with leather ties. These plaques have a very powerful image, and may have served as a "power type" piece for the wearer. Additional pieces of this type can be seen in "Treasures of the Eurasian Steppes" by Ariadne Galleries, New York, 1998. The pieces offered here are in superb to mint condition, have a high degree of eye appeal, and are better examples of this type that are normally seen. These pieces also are attached within an attractive black wooden framed shadow box, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private United Kingdom collection, circa 1980's. Note: additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Metalwork : Pre AD 1000 item #836800
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This complete piece is a solid bronze cast of a leaping lion. This piece is a vessel handle, as the two front legs have a groove under the paws which fit over the rim of a vessel. This exceptional and extremely rare bronze dates circa 150 B.C.- 225 A.D., and may be Parthian. (For another analogous example that is of the exact size and type, and may be cast from the same mold see: "Ancient Bronzes, Ceramics, and Seals. The Nasli M. Heeramaneck Collection of Ancient Near Eastern, Central Asiatic, and European Art.", Los Angeles County Museum of Art Pub., 1981, no. 659.) This complete piece is approximately 3.8 inches high by 3.7 inches long, and has a nice dark green patina. The head is seen turned to one side and has a very realistic expression, and is a superb example of art from the period. Mounted on a custom marble base. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Metalwork : Pre AD 1000 item #862556
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This scarce piece is a bronze ring that is from the Luristan culture that dwelled in Western Iran, circa 1000-800 B.C., Iron Age II. This object was cast as one solid piece, is approximately 4.9 inches in diameter, and is very heavy, as it is approximately .5 inches thick. This beautiful piece is in superb condition and has an exceptional dark green patina with light brown and reddish highlights. This massive adornment was worn above the bicep on the upper arm, and was considered to be a very valuable object by this culture. This piece was likely clamped on the upper arm of a warrior individual who wore this piece for life, and this piece has a high degree of smooth wear on the inner surfaces, which is a good indication that the owner wore this piece for a considerable length of time. The Luristan culture was a tribal society of mixed small-scale agriculturalists and pastoralists, raising sheep and goats, many horses, and perhaps using chariots where the terrain permitted. The wealth of this culture was concentrated in the hands of a warrior aristocracy who patronized the metal smiths, and they considered bronze very valuable, as it could be fashioned over and over again into weapons. This culture was highly skilled in the arts of war, and perhaps only the Spartans could have been as skilled in the use of their weapons. This piece has attractive decorative chevrons and checker-band patterns that were engraved into the metal. These designs are also seen on the ceramics for the period. (For other bronze armlets of this type see: "Ancient Bronzes, Ceramics, and Seals" by P.R.S. Moorey, Los Angeles County Museum of Art Pub., 1981, nos. 611-613.) A custom stand is included. Ex: Private German collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #968903
Apolonia Ancient Art
$625.00
This charming piece is a black steatite spindal whorl that was used for weaving textiles. This pieces dates circa 3100-2600 B.C. and is likely Anatolian or Syrian, as the four figures seen on this piece are analogous to the figures seen on carved cylinder seals for the period and region. (See Sotheby's Antiquities, London, "Western Asiatic Cylinder seals and Antiquities from the Erlenmeyer Collection, Part 1", July 1992, no. 31-33.) Black steatite is very difficult to carve, as it is a very hard stone, and this adds to the rarity of this piece. In addition, this type of stone comes mostly from the Syrian region, and cylinder seals, rather than spindle whorls, are much more common. This piece is approximately 1.25 inches in diameter, by .5 inches high. This piece is conical in shape, has a hole bow drilled through the center, and has four separate registers with a figure within. Two of the figures seen in profile may be images of a deer, and a dog or a wolf. The other two images may be seen from the top, and may represent the same animals, but if seen in profile, they are very anthropomorphic, and its also possible that both views were meant to be portrayed. This piece has very minute root marking and striations that are seen on the entire piece which is a good sign of authenticity, in addition, there are mineral deposits seen in many of the low relief points. This piece is scarce to rare, and is in superb condition for the type. A custom stand is included. Ex: Private French collection. Ex: David Leibert collection, New York., circa 1990's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Metalwork : Pre AD 1000 item #1208989
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,365.00
This interesting piece is a Near Eastern bronze roundel, that dates circa 1000-650 B.C. This rare piece is approximately 2.5 inches in diameter, and it has a concave design. This piece was likely attached to a cloth backing such as a garment, as there are some minute attachment holes seen on the outer flat perimeter band. Its quite possible that this piece could have made up a armored object such as a cuirass, a belt, or a quilted protective garment with several of these attached roundels. The concave design, with a protective inner core of leather or wood, would have offered some added strength. The flat outer perimeter band also has a detailed dotted pattern that runs around the piece, and another larger dotted pattern is seen just inside on the inner concave section of this piece. Centered in the middle of this concave section is a cat-like design which likely represents a lion or lioness, as it has a small upturned tail, paws, and feline ears, nose, and eyes. The design of the head is very interesting, as there is an insect design seen within the head of this animal. This insect resembles a bee or an ant, as seen from the perspective of a top view and looking down. This piece may be from the Luristan, Urartian, or Marlik cultures, as the fabric and artistic style of this piece is analogous to other bronze pieces from those cultures. However, the duality of design is not often seen relative to the cultures noted above, and this piece is rare to extremely rare. This piece likely was used as a "protector type" piece, given the symbols seen on this piece, and this also makes perfect sense as a work of arms. The dark green patina of this piece is exceptional, and there is some attractive spotty light brown and reds seen within this piece. This piece has some minor losses seen on the upper outer edge which does not detract from this attractive piece, and this piece has a great deal of eye appeal. This pieces comes with a custom wooden and clear Plexiglas stand, and simply slips down into the stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #924673
Apolonia Ancient Art
$565.00
This Sassanian seal has an image of an animal, possibly a wolf or a fox. The carved image is seen on the flat side of the piece, and this piece dates circa 4th-5th century A.D. The carving is done by the creation of deep lines which accent the limbs and head of the animal. This piece is made of a hard black steatite, which is very difficult to carve, and consequently, there are few Sassanian seals that are made from this material. This piece is approximately .6 inches high, and has six carved round decorative circles that are carved in high relief. These circles are a hallmark of fine Sassanian artistic style, and this type of carving is seen on carved Sassanian glass beakers. (For the type see "Masterpieces of Glass in The British Museum", by D.B. Harden, London, 1968, no.137.) There is also a bow-drilled hole that is seen at the center of the piece, and this piece was probably part of a necklace. There are some dark brown deposits seen in various sections of the piece, and there are some minute stress cracks which are an excellent mark of authenticity. This type of seal is scarce, as the material is made of a hard black steatite and the degree of workmanship is very high. This piece is from modern day Iran and the black steatite stone is native to this region. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1359731
Apolonia Ancient Art
$5,675.00
This extremely rare weapon is a bronze slashing sword that dates circa 1800-1200 B.C. This remarkable piece is approximately 21.4 inches long, by 2.25 inches wide at the point where the blade meets the shank of the weapon. This piece was hand forged into one piece from bronze, and is a thick and heavy bronze weapon. This powerful weapon also has a blade that slightly graduates in width from the shank to the blunt end, and this blade section of the weapon is slightly curved. The straight rectangle shaped "extended shaft" is also very durable, and is approximately .5 inches wide at the shank, by .25 inches thick. This weapon's "extended shaft" also slightly graduates in size, mostly with the width, from the shank to the end of the handle. The cutting edge of the blade is also only on one side, as the blunt end is flat, along with the top side of the blade. Overall, this weapon is very finely made for the period, and has subtle dimensions of construction which makes it a very special and specialized work of ancient arms. This weapon was designed to slash through an enemy with one sweeping motion, and an extended "wooden shaft handle" would have allowed this weapon to be held with one or two hands. This design also allowed this weapon to likely be able to penetrate heavy armor such as a helmet or a breastplate, as the "extended shaft" attached to an extended "wooden shaft handle" would allow one to generate a tremendous amount of force. This weapon may also have been designed for use from a chariot or horseback, as the owner would be able to slash in a downwards motion, which would have generated even more force than a horizontal slash. This weapon may also be of a type that was used in the battle of Kadesh, circa 1274 B.C., which was the largest chariot battle ever fought in antiquity, and involved perhaps 5,000-6,000 war chariots. This battle pitted the Hittite Empire under Muwatalli II against the Egyptian Empire under Ramesses II, and many types of weapons were created by both sides for this conflict. This piece has an attractive dark green patina with some red highlights, and some spotty light to dark green mineralization. This piece is also intact, has no repair/restoration, and has an ever so slight bend at the shank which may indicate that this piece was in battle. This weapon is extremely rare, is a highly specialized work of ancient arms, and is one of the most devastating weapons from antiquity. A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre 1800 item #1075483
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This interesting document is a Persian illuminated manuscript page that depicts the Persian mythical hero Rostam on horseback escaping a dragon. This piece is likely late 17th-18th century A.D., and is approximately 7.5 inches wide by 10.75 inches high. There is some light brown paper ageing seen on the left side and at the bottom of the page, otherwise this intact piece is in superb condition. One side of this page has four lines of elegant nasta'liq script, seen above a fine-line drawn scene, and there are four lines of script seen below. The back side of this detailed document has 20 lines of script, and there are some light red lines that underline sections of script. The fine-line drawn scene has Rostam galloping to the left on horseback, and he is seen looking back at a fire breathing dragon that appears to be emerging from a hidden place. An analogous scene, of Rostam slaying a dragon from horseback with a sword, can be seen on another example offered by Sotheby's New York, "Indian, Himalayan and Southeast Asian Art", Oct. 1990, no. 7. (This piece is 7 inches wide by 11.2 inches high, $4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates. See attached photos.) The piece offered here has great detail within the fine-line drawn scene, and the light blue, white, yellow, and red colors are very vibrant. In addition, the sky above the light blue mountains and the saddle blanket are both highlighted with a gold gilt, and this gives the scene an ethereal perspective. The light blue mountains and the foreground are also meant to convey a magical world, as Rostam was known in Persian myth to have carried out the "Seven Labours of Rostam", and the "Third Stage" of this myth involves his faithful horse awakening him in time to escape a monstrous dragon serpent, which later allowed Rostam to be able to slay this monster. This "Third Stage" scene of the "Seven Labours of Rostam" myth is likely what is seen on the manuscript offered here, as Rostam is also the mythical national hero of "Greater Persia" which originated with the first Persian Empire in Persis circa 1400 B.C. This piece is a better example than what is normally seen on the market, and this document also has great eye appeal. This piece is ready for mounting, and is in a protective plastic cover with a hard backing which is made for storage and shipping. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #943121
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865.00
This piece is an exceptionally large carved marble seal that is approximately 2 inches in diameter by .75 inches high. This piece dates circa 4th Millennium B.C., and is flat on one side with an oval shape on the other. The flat side displays a running ibex that is seen facing right, and there is a crescent moon and a single dot solar symbol that is is seen above. There is also a bow drilled hole that is seen running through the center, and this piece was probably attached to a cord that was worn over the neck of the individual that owned this piece. This piece likely served as an individual seal for the owner, and may have been used as a mark of value. The design was also bow drilled, as there are individual bow-drilled circles that constitute the overall design that is seen on the flat face of this scarce piece. This piece is analogous to an example seen in Bonhams Antiquities, London, May 2008, no. 348. This type of design is also analogous to several cultures that were found in the ancient Near East during this early period, and this type of design is often seen in Anatolia/North Syria, and is often found on hardstone seals made from black steatite. The marble that this piece is made from, was likely imported into the region, and it is a scarce material for a seal this large. This piece has a nice light grey patina and there are spotty white and light brown calcite deposits. There are also some concentrated straight marks on the oval side, and this piece may also have served as a wet stone for a blade during a later period in antiquity. A nice rare seal not often seen on the market. Ex: Erlenmeyer Collection, Basel, Switzerland. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, London, June 1997, no. 1. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #778770
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,385.00
This banded white and light yellow marble Sumerian stamp seal is in the form of a recumbent fox and dates circa 3500-2900 B.C. This superb piece is approximately 1.25 inches long and is an exceptional example for the type. This esoteric piece has a bow drilled hole that runs through the top to the bottom center, and there are two animals seen on the flat back side that were carved into the piece. The overall carving of this piece is very detailed and represents a high degree of workmanship, as this piece was produced at the very dawn of civilization when city-states were first formed. The two animals, seen on the back flat side, appear to be identical and served as a stamp and/or seal, and may have represented value in a transaction. This mint quality stamp seal/amulet appears to be a fox, as the head is very angular, along with the raised ears. ( For another analogous example see Sotheby's Antiquities, "The Ada Small Moore Collection of Ancient Near Eastern Seals", New York, Dec. 1991, no. 3, $3,000.00-$5,000.00 estimates. ) This piece was probably part of a necklace, and the vertical bow drilled hole allowed this piece to hang with other seals/amulets of this type. This translucent piece has some spotty mineral deposits, and these deposits can be seen within the eyes, and become darker when one looks through this piece into a lighted background. ( See attached photo. ) This eerie effect makes this piece look alive, and the deposits seen within the eyes may in part be original inlay. Only a skilled artist could achieve this visual effect. This exceptional piece is mounted on a custom plexiglas stand, can easily lift off the stand, and can be worn today. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre 1800 item #1075389
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This interesting document is a Persian illuminated manuscript page that depicts two hunters slaying two running deer. This piece is likely late 17th-18th century A.D., and is approximately 7.5 inches wide by 9.9 inches high. This piece is in superb condition, and has very vibrant black, light blue, yellow, red, white, and brown colors. One side of this page has two lines of elegant nasta'liq script, seen above a fine-line drawn scene, and there are three lines of script seen in the upper left side margin. In addition, there is a single line of script seen in the upper left side corner of the fine-line drawn scene. The back side of this detailed document has 21 lines of script, and there are several lines of script that appear to be added notes that are seen in the left margin of the page and between several lines of the text. The fine-line drawn scene has two hunters on horseback, and they are hunting two deer, as one hunter shoots an arrow into a jumping deer, while the other chases a running deer with a sword. The scene has very vibrant colors, and the sky above the light blue mountains, the saddle blankets, the arrow quivers, and the sword are all highlighted with a gold gilt. The light blue mountains and foreground are also meant to convey a magical world, and in combination with the gold gilt highlights, give the scene an ethereal perspective. The scene may also represent a Persian myth of the hero Rostam, who carried out the "Seven Labours of Rostam", and the "Fourth Stage" of this myth involves Rostam traveling on horseback through an enchanted territory where he finds provisions including a ready roasted deer. This myth is likely what is portrayed on the manuscript page offered here, as Rostam is also the mythical national hero of "Greater Persia" which originated with the first Persian Empire in Persis circa 1400 B.C. This piece is a better example than what is normally seen on the market, and has great eye appeal. This piece is ready for mounting, and is in a protective plastic cover with a hard backing which is made for storage and shipping. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1268083
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This striking piece is a hard stone mace head that dates to the Predynastic Period, circa 3200 B.C. This piece is approximately 2.3 inches high, and is pear shaped. This piece has a bow drilled hole that runs through the center of the piece, and was connected to a wooden staff. This piece is made from a beautiful multi-colored hard stone, and looks to be a combination of light brown marble and light to dark green serpentine. There is some spotty hardened white calcite deposits seen on sections of the piece, and this piece has no cracks and/or chips and is in superb to mint "as found" condition. This piece is also typical of the mace heads that have been found in Egypt and the ancient Near East, and it is also possible that this piece is votive, as well as having been used during the lifetime of the warrior that owned this weapon. This piece also has some weight to it, and it surely was a formidable weapon for the period. This type of piece has also been classified for the type and period by J. Crowfoot Payne in "Catalog of the Predynastic Egyptian collection in the Ashmolean Museum", Oxford and New York, 1993, nos. 1251-1261. This piece has a high degree of eye appeal, although it is a simple shape. This piece also sits on a custom Plexiglas/wooden stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Private Swiss collection circa 1980's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv.#P33-040-102314. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certity that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1331717
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This extremely rare weapon is a bronze mace/sword that dates circa 1800-1200 B.C. This piece is approximately 17.5 inches long, by 2 inches wide at it's widest point, which is near the tip end of the weapon. This piece was hand forged from bronze, and is a thick and heavy bronze weapon. This piece also graduates in thickness from the shank end to the tip of the weapon, and at the tip of the weapon, this heavy weapon is approximately .32 inches thick. This piece was made as a combination mace and a "blunt-ended" type sword, which had devastating effect on heavily armed warriors that had helmets and other body armor. This weapon was designed to crush helmets with it's blunt end, and penetrate armor with sheer force. This piece also has an attachment hole near the tip end which was likely used to hold a leather tie that was used either to hang or suspend the weapon for use. This piece likely did not fit into a scabbard, as the shape of this weapon with the curved end would not easily fit into a scabbard as a straight blade can. In addition, this extremely rare weapon either had a handle attached to the shank for use with one hand, or it may have had an extended wooden shaft attached to the shank that was used by the warrior with two hands. An extended handle of this type would generate a tremendous amount of force, and it may be that a weapon of this type was used by a warrior in a war chariot or from horseback. There is also the possibility that if this weapon had an extended handle, it may have been used by infantry against mounted or chariot forces in order to crush their heavy armor. This weapon may also be of a type that was also used in the battle of Kadesh, circa 1274 B.C., which was the largest chariot battle ever fought in antiquity, and involved perhaps 5,000-6,000 war chariots. This battle pitted the Hittite Empire under Muwatalli II against the Egyptian Empire under Ramesses II, and many types of weapons were created by both sides for this conflict. The metal composition of this impressive weapon has sections with striated surfaces, and this type of metal composition does match other Egyptian bronze weaponry from the period, and the form of this weapon is somewhat analogous to the Egyptian sickle sword known as a "khopesh". This type of weapon was also designed to pull with a hook at the end, stab with it's pointed end, and slice with it's curved blade. This "khopesh" is a muti-purpose designed weapon, as the mace/sword weapon offered here, and both of these types of weapons could be used several ways in battle. The mace/sword weapon offered here has a "flat mace edge" on one side that is for a crushing application, and the other side has a "blunt sword edge" for a cutting and slicing application. This piece also has several dark brown and green mineral deposits seen in various sections of the piece, and some spotty red and dark brown highlights within the metal. This piece is also 100% intact, and has no repair/restoration. Overall, this piece is an extremely rare weapon that is highly specialized, is one of the most devastating weapons from antiquity, and is a weapon that has seldom been on the market. A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1027193
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This extremely rare piece is an early Islamic glass flask, circa 6th-8th century A.D. This intact piece is approximately 2.8 inches high, and is a light green color with multi-colored iridescence that is seen on various inner and outer sections of the vessel. This piece is rather thick walled, has a fairly wide indented bottom, a short tubular neck that has a slight flattening at the base, and a pontil-mark on the bottom. In addition, the neck is folded to the inside, and there are three stepped bulges seen within the neck which are a light yellow, green, and purple color. This piece is likely an early example of Islamic glass, due to the overall fabric of the vessel and the neck design as noted above. This piece is from an extremely rare early Islamic glass group, and some of these extremely rare pieces from this group are also listed as "possibly Sassanian", but given the probable region, i.e. Syro-Palestinian or Cypriot, where this piece was likely manufactured, a Sassanian attribution from modern day central Iran is highly unlikely. This piece, as being from this extremely rare early Islamic glass group, is also one of the earliest Islamic glass examples recorded. An analogous example listed as "possibly Islamic and of possible Syro-Palestinian or Cypriot manufacture", approximately 2.5 inches high, is seen in "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum", by John B. Hayes, Royal Ontario Museum Pub., 1975, no. 670. (See attached photo.) Another extremely rare example is seen in Sotheby Park Bernet Inc., Important Antiquities, New York, Dec. 1978, no. 138. (This piece is nearly the same size as the piece offered here, and is listed as "probably later Sassanian or early Islamic, circa 5th-8th century A.D.") The example offered here has a type of construction within the neck that required a great deal of skill, and is more advanced than the typical late Roman blown glass that is seen in the 4th-5th century A.D. Islamic glass also tends to have several colors within the glass, in contrast to the Sassanian culture, which was known for producing faceted cut glass that was more uniform in color. The Sassanian culture, circa 6th-8th century A.D., was from central modern day Iran, and was very skilled at glass production, and they are known for being able to take a solid cube of glass and carve/sculpt this into a faceted cup, bowl, or a plate. The exceptional small flask offered here is not only in mint condition, but it is also a type that is not seen on the market or in private collections. This extremely rare piece is a little gem and would be an excellent addition to a collection of ancient glass. Ex: Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1278878
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This interesting piece is a Near Eastern red steatite kohl vessel, that dates circa 2nd-3rd Millenium B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 2 inches high, and is a complete intact example with no repair and/or restoration. This interesting piece is rectangular shaped, and is in the shape of a tower. There is a circular opening seen at the top, along with four raised corners, and there is a hollow core that runs down into the center of the vessel. This vessel is also decorated with notches and bow-drilled "recessed concentric circle" designs on all four sides. There are also nine (9) "recessed concentric circle" designs seen on each side, and some of these "recessed concentric circle" designs are more deeply drilled than others. This vessel, besides being a very attractive architectural type piece, is a "kohl vessel" which contained compacted material (grayish-black or white powder). The grayish-black material was known as "kohl", which was used to protect and heal the eyes in a desert and/or an arid enviroment. The white powder, which is sometimes found in this type of vessel, was used to coat the face and served as a sun block. There are also remains of a grayish-black "kohl" material found in the vessel offered here as well. This vessel was also usually fitted with a bronze stick that served to remove and apply the product. This piece also has some white calcite deposits seen in the low relief sections of this piece, and has some attractive deep black colored veins that run throughout this hard red steatite stone. This type of vessel was widespread in the ancient Near East and Mesopotamia, as well as the Iranian plateau, Margiana, and Greek Bactria. However, the red steatite material seen with this vessel is scarce to rare, and was highly prized in antiquity, and there are very few recorded examples of this type made from this beautiful dark red stone. This piece is an attractive scarce type, and is seldom seen on the market. This piece also sits on a custom display stand. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv.#12955. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Metalwork : Pre AD 1000 item #840348
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This rare piece is a solid cast bronze that is in the form of a standing goat. This piece is probably Sassanian, dates circa 250-640 A.D., and was produced in the ancient Near East. This piece is approximately 3 inches high by 4 inches long, and has a nice dark green patina. The surfaces of this piece have spotty light white and green calcite deposits, minute wear on the bottom of the feet, and minute scratches which all indicate great age. This piece also has pegs that extend outwards from the feet, and these pegs may have supported wheels which made this piece well served as a toy, but more likely, the pegs were fitted into a flat bronze base or into a wooden fitting. This piece may also have been a votive offering and/or served as a chariot fitting. The goat also appears to have a slight smile which gives this piece a lively expression. This piece is analogous in artistic design and size to another bronze figurine, of a standing Ibex, that is seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, May 1986, no. 99. ($2,000.00-$3,000.00 estimates.) The piece offered here is a rare pre-Islamic bronze piece that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1231949
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This beautiful piece is a Sasanian blown and molded bowl that dates circa 5th-6th century A.D. This piece is approximately 2.75 inches high by 3.7 inches in diameter, and is an exceptional example for the type. This exceptional mint quality piece also has one of the best "as found" patinas seen on a vessel of this type, and has attractive thick encrusted spotty dark brown and muti-colored iridescent mineral deposits, which is seen over a pale green glass. This thick-walled piece has an even smooth surface, and pieces of this type were also cut with diamond and/or round pattern registers. This piece was skillfully blown into a mold, and this also explains why the side wall of this beautiful vessel has a uniform shape and has a gradual rounded surface. The mold was then removed, and the piece was then removed from the attached metal rod at the base after it cooled. A "tang" or "pontil" mark can still be seen on the outer bottom base of the piece. A much higher skill was required to form a vessel of this type, relative to the more common and numerous Roman "free blown" examples which were not mold made. An analogous Sasanian bowl of this type with cut registers is seen in the Shosoin shrine in Nara, Japan, and was an early export from Sasanian Persia to East Asia (See P.O. Harper, "The Royal Hunter; Art of the Sasanian Empire, New York, 1977, p. 159, no. 82.). This piece is one of the finest example's of it's type, as it has a natural and beautiful patina in it's scarce "as found" mint condition. Ex: Manhattan Galleries, New York, circa 1970's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: