Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #1355169
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This beautiful piece is a light blue Roman glass ribbed bowl that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 6.75 inches in diameter, by 2.2 inches high, and is in flawless condition with no hairline cracks, chips, or any other imperfections. This piece also has 26 vertical ribs that increase in thickness, and run upwards from the flat bottom to just below the upper rim. This type of bowl is also known as a "pillar-molded" bowl, as it was mold made, and was then ground and polished into shape. There are also two decorative well-defined "wheel-cut concentric grooves", and a small well-defined "wheel-cut circle" seen on the inner bottom center of the bowl. In addition, there are two shallow "wheel-cut grooves" that are seen running around the middle of the inner wall. These shallow "wheel-cut grooves" are also so shallow in sections that they do not appear to have been intended as a decorative type element, but rather are marks that resulted from centering a polishing tool within the inner surface of the bowl. There are also some faint polishing lines still visible on the inner surface, as this piece is in mint condition, and may have been offered solely as a votive type object. This piece also has a spotty multi-colored iridescence, and some light earthen deposits seen mostly on the outer surface of the vessel. The exceptional piece offered here is also one of the better recorded examples, and is nearly identical and larger than the example sold in Christies Antiquities, New York, June 2012, lot 151 ($4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates, $9,375.00 realized. 5.4 inches in diameter, with 22 vertical ribs. See attached photo.) Another example that was recently sold was offered in Christie's Antiquities, London, July 2016, lot 204 ($15,000.00-$22,000.00 estimates, $16,138.00 realized. 5.75 inches in diameter, with 26 vertical ribs.) The piece offered here is not only one of the best recorded examples, but it is also a beautiful example with a light blue color that has a high degree of eye appeal, and as such, it compares in color and quality to the two other examples noted above. For the type see John Hayes, "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum", 1975, nos. 50-52. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1357890
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This complete and detailed piece is a Roman bronze eagle that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 2 inches high, by 1.75 inches wide, and is intact with no restoration/repair. This piece is a standing Roman eagle that is seen looking left, and has very realistic features. This piece has very detailed feathers seen on the outstretched wings, and well-defined dotted eyes. This piece also has a beautiful dark green patina, and has a great deal of eye appeal. This ceremonial piece was likely in a private Roman shrine known as a "lararium", and may also have been worshipped by a Roman legionnaire, as the Roman eagle represented Rome itself and was the symbol of the Roman military. This realistic piece also stands on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1283823
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This visually appealing piece is a Roman marble of the goddess Minerva, and dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 8.75 inches high, by 5 inches wide. This piece is a helmeted bust of the Roman goddess Minerva, who also doubled as the Greek goddess Athena. This piece shows Minerva with finely carved hair that is seen under the edges of the Corinthian type helmet, and is a portrait of a young woman that conveys the eternal beauty of the goddess. She is also seen with a serene expression, and her rounded chin also conveys a goddess that is perceived as a powerful woman. The helmet also has a raised crest, and has an inset square dowel joint on each side that probably supported a running Pegasus that was mounted on each side of the helmet. In addition, this piece is carved in the round, and the helmet design is seen on the back side of the bust as well. The face is completely intact, with no major breaks, and the carving of the eyes, nose, and the delicate mouth is extremely detailed. The eyes also have center drilled dots with a carved circular iris, which give this piece a very dynamic "alive" look, and the treatment of the eyes in this fashion is typical for Roman portraiture especially during the Antonine Period, circa 2nd century A.D. This piece also has a nice light gray patina, with heavier dark gray mineral deposits seen at the back of the bust. This piece is also analogous in design to the earlier Greek Athenian coinage, circa 5th century B.C., which shows on the obverse a helmeted Athena in profile wearing a Corinthian type helmet, with a helmet crest and dotted necklace. This piece also follows the design of the Greek gold coinage of Alexander the Great, who placed a helmeted bust of Athena on the obverse of his gold staters, circa late 4th century B.C. This piece is scarce to rare on the market, as it likely completed a full size standing and draped statue of the goddess. The portrait type of this piece was derived from an earlier Greek prototype, which is thought to be a large full standing bronze cult statue that is known as the "Athena Sunias", which was displayed in a temple dedicated to Athena at Cape Sounion. (See G. Despinis, "Athena Sunias-Eine Vermutung", Archaologischer Anzeiger, 1999, pp. 173-181.) An analogous example without the helmet crest and dotted necklace, and of nearly the same size was offered by Halan J. Berk of Chicago, Ill. in "Ancient Art", 1987, no. 45. (See attached photo.) The Berk example was also mounted on a custom display stand, as the piece offered here, with a center pin running up into the lower neck where the break occurred. The piece offered here has a great deal of eye appeal, as the facial design of this piece, especially with the treatment of the eyes and delicate mouth, provide this piece with a very dynamic "alive" and "penetrating" look. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, circa 2000-2014, Inv.# P33-059-012614b. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1278504
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This rare piece is a Roman iron javelin head that dates circa 3rd-4th century A.D. This piece is approximately 5.7 inches long, and is a complete example. This piece has a barbed "spiked tang" head at the end, and a rounded lead weight attached to the shaft about 3.5 inches from the end of this formable weapon. This piece has an exceptional dark brown patina, is in superb condition, and is preserved with a wax sealant which has preserved the iron shaft. There are also some spotty dark brown and white calcite mineral deposits seen mostly on the lead weight. This weapon was also known as a "hasta plumbata", meaning "leaded spear", or as referred to by the ancient source Vegetius, as a "martiobarbalus", meaning "Mars-barb". (See Vegetius, "Epitoma Rei Militaris", translated by N.P. Milner, Liverpool University Press, 1993.) Another ancient source, the "De Rebus Bellicus", M.W.C. Hassall and R.T. Ireland (eds), 1979, Oxford, describes the "plumbata Mamillata", meaning "breasted javelin", as a javelin with a lead weight and a pointed iron head, with flights attached to the opposite end of the shaft. The epithet 'breasted' likely refers to the bulbous lead weight. This lead weight was also molded onto and around the iron shaft, and was solidly attached to the shaft. This type of weapon is rare, as only a few examples have been recovered from the British Isles, notably Wroxeter; and even fewer examples have been found in Germany, notably Augst and Castell Weissenberg, and Lorch, Austria. However, the ancient source Vegetius, (1.17), does state that two Illyrican legions were renamed "Martiobarbuli Ioviani" and "Martiobarbuli Herculiani" by the joint emperors Diocletian and Maximianus because of their proficiency with this weapon. He further states that five "plumbatae" were carried by a soldier in the concavity of his shield, and they were thrown at first charge, or used to defend with the reserves and could penetrate the body or foot of the assailant. This weapon was also thought to easily penetrate shields because of the lead weight, and could be thrown at great distance. Vegetius, (1.17), further states that soldiers using the "plumbata" take the place of archers, "for they wound both the men and the horses of the enemy before they come within reach of the common missle weapons". This weapon was truly an innovation in Roman battle tactics, and is a weapon that is seldom seen on the market today, as it was made from iron which easily deteriorates in mineralized soils. Another rare piece of this type is seen in "The Late Roman Army" by Pat Southern and Karen Dixon, Yale University Press, 1996, p. 114, Fig. 46. A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Addition documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1191053
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This scarce and mint quality Roman ring dates circa mid 1st century B.C., and is approximately ring size 6 to 6.5. This piece is bronze, and has a traces of silver gilt that was highly polished. This piece is of superb to mint condition, and has a nice dark brown/green patina with some silvered highlights. The flat face has deep carving, and this seal ring produces an impressed image that is seen in high relief. This impressed image is seen facing right when the ring is pressed into a material such as wax or a soft clay, and the image has very sharp detail which is the bust of a young woman. This image closely resembles that of a young Octavia Minor, who was the sister of Octavian/Augustus and the third wife of Marcus Antonius, whom she married afer the death of her first husband, Caius Marcellus, in 40 B.C. She was also instumental in bringing about the treaty of Tarentum in 37 B.C., when Antonius and Octavian agreed to renew the Triumvirate. She was essentially a noble, loyal, and kindly woman who even looked after her step-children in Rome even after Antonius had formally divorced her. The wearer of this ring likely was a supporter of the imperial family of Octavian/Augustus, and was also likely a young woman. The portrait bust seen here has very analogous features to the known portraits of Octavia Minor, and this includes hair that is seen rolled into a bun at the back, and is seen rolled on each side of the head. There is also a hair curl seen hanging down in front of the ear, and there is a small mouth with an aquiline type nose. The portraits of Octavia Minor also closely resemble those of Livia, Octavian/Augustus wife, whose earliest coiffures were the same as hers. (For a discription of the portrait type see "Roman Historical Portraits" by J.M.C. Toynbee, Thames and Hudson Pub., London, 1978, pp. 48-50.) It's quite possible that the young woman seen on this superb Roman ring may also have been created to represent both of the Imperial ladies noted above, and in turn, represented support for the Imperial family. This scarce to rare ring can be worn today, as it is very solid, and it is a very fine example of a Roman jewelry piece from the early Imperial period. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Coins : Pre AD 1000 item #1150976
Apolonia Ancient Art
$265.00
This is a group of three (3) late Roman bronze coins that were minted by the emperor Gratian. These coins were minted circa 367-383 A.D., and are all AE 3 (17 mm) and grade EF to Superb. Coins A,B. and C (left to right) all show the pearl-diademed and draped bust of Gratian facing right on the obverse. The reverse shows - Coin A: Gratian advancing right, dragging captive and holding labarum, GLORIARO-MANORVM left and right, H right field. (Sear no. 4142.) Coin B: Victory advancing left, SECVRITAS-REIPVBLICAE left and right. (Sear no. 4143.) Coin C: Gratian advancing right, dragging captive and holding labarum, GLORIARO-MANORVM left and right, H left field, Star and P right field (Sear no. 4142.) All three of these detailed coins are slightly different with different symbols, and are all minted in the Siscia mint (Sisak, former Yugoslavia), as indicated by the SIS as seen below the ground line on the reverse of all three coins. All three coins have a beautiful glossy dark green patina, and have exceptional line designed detail. (A coin with a EF grade, Gratian dragging a captive reverse type, sold in Gorny & Mosch, March 2012, for $106.00.) Ex: Harlan J. Berk, circa 1980's. I certify that these coins are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1290942
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,365.00
This attractive piece is a Roman bronze ring that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D. This complete piece is approximately 1 inch wide, is ring size 6.5, and was made for a young man or woman. This ring has an oval shaped hoop, and this shape provided for a wide face that looks very large when worn on the finger. This piece is very solid and can easily be worn today as well. This piece has sections of original gold gilt seen over the bronze, and this piece has a brilliant translucent orange carnelian stone that is firmly attached to the bronze bezel. The beautiful carnelian stone was never reattached to the ring, and it is firmly in place in it's original setting. The brilliant orange carnelian stone also has a carved image of a seated animal, possibly a dog or a fox. This animal is seen on a ground line, and has raised ears and a long curled tail. The brilliant orange carnelian stone is also highly polished, has an oval shape, a flat bottom, and is clear save for a small black inclusion that is deep within the stone. This piece was also used as a personal seal/signet ring, and makes a sharp impression. The condition of this piece is superb, and is intact with no repair/restoration, and has original gold gilt seen on the inner and outer surfaces of the bronze bezel. Overall, this attractive piece is in better condition than most examples of its type, and is in its natural "as found" condition. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, New York and Geneva, Inv. #P33-091-031915. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #584291
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This mint quality Roman glass "sprinkler" flask dates circa 3rd century AD and is in flawless condition. This piece is approximately 3.25 inches high, is larger than most examples, and has a nice silver/gold patina. This piece has a light blue-green color and has spotty mineral deposits. The name "sprinkler" flask is a modern day name given to a flask of this type, as it was designed with an interior valve and a wide, flat opening. This allowed for the contained liquid to sprinkle, rather than pour. This piece was also mold made from two separate halves, and the main body has a lattice-work type design. This piece is scarce in this condition with this clear molded design. This piece is seen on a clear plexiglas stand that is included. Ex: New York private collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1373047
Apolonia Ancient Art
$725.00
This scarce Roman bronze lamp dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and is approximately 2.5 inches long, by 1.1 inches high. This piece is complete, has no breaks and/or chips, and is in mint "as found" condition. This piece has two openings, one in the top center for filling oil, and the other at the end of the vessel that would hold the wick. The other end of the vessel has an attachment hoop for a chain, or a cord, and could have been hung as a votive offering pendant. This piece also has a flat bottom and easily stands by itself. This piece not only was likely made as a votive offering, but it was also likely functional as well. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina with dark red highlights, and has some heavy dark brown mineral deposits on the inside of the vessel. This piece comes with a custom Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1357105
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This pair of Roman gold earrings with hemispherical shields are complete, and date circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. These lovely pieces are approximately .68 inches in diameter for the hoops, and the hemispherical shields are approximately .25 inches in diameter. Together the pair weighs 1.6 grams, and they are solid gold and are not plated. The hemispherical shields have a smooth facing surface, and have a great deal of eye appeal because of their simplicity of design. These pieces can easily be worn today with some adjustments, as they do not open with a clasp, and were tied off so the wearer could wear these every day. These pieces are a nice collectable pair of ancient jewelry, and have a pleasing eye appeal. For the type see: Ruseva-Prokoska L., "Roman Jewelry, A Collection of National Archaeological Museum", Sofia, Bulgaria, 1991, no. 43. A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1353007
Apolonia Ancient Art
$765.00
This attractive piece is a Roman bronze figurine of the god Mercury, and dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D. This piece is approximately 2.25 inches high, and is a complete example with no repair/restoration. This piece has an attractive light to dark green patina, along with some minute spotty red mineralized highlights. There is also some spotty light brown mineral deposits, and overall, this piece is in it's superb natural "as found" condition. This piece was cast as one piece from a mold, and was likely produced as a votive object for a temple, or for a private Roman shrine in a home known as a "lararium". Mercury is also the Roman name for the Greek god Hermes, and both gods had the same attributes, and are seen wearing a winged helmet or cap known as a "petasus". In addition, the figurine offered here is seen holding a money bag in his right hand, and a "caduceus" over his right shoulder along with a draped cloak. The "caduceus" also served as a herald's staff which possessed magical powers, and has two entwined snakes at the top. Hermes and Mercury both were the Greek and Roman gods of commerce, travel, and were the messengers of the gods. This nude figurine is also seen wearing a necklace, and stands by itself on it's own double tiered base. This piece was meant to be seen in it's upright position, as the base is very wide at the bottom. This piece for a small object has a great deal of eye appeal, and can be seen at a distance because of it's simplistic design. The face has a "mask-like" design, and imbues this piece with a magical haunting appearance. It's very likely that a religious pilgrim would have purchased this object as a votive donation to either a religious temple, or as an addition to a private shrine. This piece also sits on a custom raised display stand, and simply lifts off the stand. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1306126
Apolonia Ancient Art
$985.00
These three Roman vessels are from the northern reaches of the empire, and date circa 3rd-early 4th century A.D. These three pieces are approximately 3.4, 3.5, and 4.5 inches high, and are all in flawless mint quality condition. These pieces are made from a tan terracotta, and have "strap designed" handles that are attached to the rim and main body of each vessel. There are some attractive spotty white calcite deposits and root marking seen on various sections of the vessels, and the bottom half of each vessel flares to a small and elegant round circular flat base. These esoteric designed pieces likely served as daily tableware vessels, and were likely used for wine and water. There are two cups with a single strap handle, and a larger three-handled storage vessel that may have held a grain product. These matching pieces were also produced in the Rhineland area, possibly in or near the Roman stronghold Trier, which was also a thriving ceramic production center. Ceramics of the type offered here were exported over a wide geographical region, and were popular in the western and northern reaches of the empire. The ceramics offered here are also very thin walled, and were produced with a very high firing temperature. This firing technique not only produced a fine ceramic that was very light, but also one that is very durable. Trier was also known for producing fine thin walled ceramics in antiquity, and the city was also the location where Constantine the Great established his summer residence, circa 306 A.D., and Trier subsequently became the capital of Rome's Western Empire. The pieces offered here have parallels that are classified as being circa 3rd century A.D., and are seen in "Pottery of the Roman Period. The Athenian Agora Vol. V.", by H.S. Robinson, Princeton, 1959, no. M191. These pieces are scarce on the market, as they are a matching set and are in near mint condition. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1990's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1319492
Apolonia Ancient Art
$325.00
This group of five (5) Roman glass fragments date circa 1st century B.C.-2nd century A.D. They are approximately .5 inches wide (piece A), 1.75 inches wide (piece B), .6 inches wide (piece C), .65 inches wide (piece D), and .5 inches wide (piece E). Pieces A to E are seen from left to right, top and bottom rows. Piece "A" is a mosaic glass bowl fragment that has green, yellow, blue, and red bands. Piece "B" is a solid deep dark blue cast fragment that has some decorative floral patterns. Piece "C" is from a mosaic bowl or cup that has white and dark blue eye patterns. Piece "D" is from a blue and white mosaic vessel, and piece "E" is a rim fragment of a mosaic bowl and has white, blue, and amber colors. All of these fragments are all translucent, and display bright colors. These fragments are all different examples of early Roman glass, and make an excellent study group. Another study group of twenty-three (23) glass fragments was recently offered in Bonham's Antiquities, London, April 2015, lot no. 105. ($6,100.00-$9,100.00 estimates. See attached photo.) The five (5) colorful fragments offered here are mounted on a custom Plexiglas stand, and can easily be removed if so desired. Ex: Joel Malter collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1295159
Apolonia Ancient Art
$12,675.00
This rare piece is a Roman bronze figurine that dates circa 1st-3rd century A.D. This impressive piece is approximately 2.8 inches high, and is an intact example with no repair/restoration. This complete piece also has an even beautiful dark blue/green patina with spotty red highlights, and is in excellent condition with no noticeable breaks or chips. This piece is seen standing with the full weight on the left leg, and the other leg is slightly bent while the body is seen slightly leaning to the right. This piece also stands by itself, and is placed on a custom stand for added stability. This piece has extremely refined facial detail, and there are other minute details seen on this piece such as the design of the sandals. The figure seen here may also depict Alexander the Great, as it displays many attributes that are known for this dynamic Greek figure from antiquity. Although this piece is a Roman bronze, the Greek features seen on this piece are unmistakable, such as the Greek muscled cuirass which is worn over the Greek knee-length "chiton", the attached cape "chlamys" which falls behind, and the pose of the figure that is seen with the weight on one leg. In addition, this figure has upswept curls above the forehead known as an "anastole" hair style, along with thick locks of leonine hair, deep set eyes, an angular jaw, and a prominent brow which are all facial features of Alexander the Great. This figure is also seen extending his right arm, and the open upturned hand likely held a missing round "phiale", which held wine that was used for sacrificial offerings to the Gods. This military figure also appears to be in the act of offering wine sacrifice to the Gods, and this type of wine sacrifice using a "phiale" was purely a Greek religious rite, rather than a Roman ritual. It's possible that this figurine reminded the owner in Roman times of Alexander's visit to Troy, as he was the new Achilles - the champion of the Greeks and, as Achilles had done 1,000 years before, he sacrificed in the temple of Athena. Wealthy and cultivated Romans would often engage the topic of Alexander's notable personality, his superhuman accomplishments, and the human fate with their philosophical discourses. It would not be surprising to find his image in the intimacy of a domestic villa. The famous Villa dei Papiri in Herculaneum contained a whole collection of several bronze busts representing Greek Hellenistic rulers, Greek poets, and philosophers, which serves as an eloquent example of the cultural preferences of the Roman elite. This figurine also appears to be grasping a Roman sword known as a "gladius", which had a rounded pummel as seen here. The Roman general Marcus Antony also favored Greek dress as seen on this figurine, and this piece may also represent a "duality of portraiture", in that it is a combination of Greek and Roman attributes, and may represent more than one famous individual and/or military leader. What is certain relative to this rare figurine, is that this figure is both a military and religious figure, and this combination is best displayed in the figurine offered here. (Another analogous example of a Roman bronze figurine in the guise of Alexander the Great, was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, in "Art of the Ancient World", Vol. XXIII, 2012, no. 49. Approximately 3.75 inches high, circa 1st-3rd century A.D., and complete. $47,500.00 fixed price. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is a rare type that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1378549
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This exceptional Roman silver denarius is attributed to Pescennius Niger, and dates circa 193-194 A.D. This piece is approximately 19mm wide, weighs 2.89 gms, and is in Good Extremely Fine condition, otherwise graded Superb, (EF+/EF+). This piece is also thought to have been minted in Antioch, and is apparently a unique set of dies. This coin is also thought to be the finest of just four recorded examples bearing this reverse type. The (Obv.) obverse features the wreathed and draped bust of Pescennius Niger facing right within a dotted border, and IMP CAES C PESC NIGER IVST AVG around. The (Rev.) reverse shows Niger standing left holding a globe and sword hilt, crowned by Victory standing left within a dotted border, and VICTORIAE AVG around. This coin is also extremely rare to unique, as the coinage of this ruler was meticulously recalled by Septimius Severus in 194 A.D. The portrait seen on this coin is also very realistic, and is superior to most numismatic images seen on this coinage. An exceptional example that is one of the finest recorded examples. References: CNG 69, June 2005, lot 1648 (Similar dies.); RIC-; BMC-; RSC-. Ex: Roma Numismatics, Auction IX, March 2015, no. 746. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1373145
Apolonia Ancient Art
$725.00
This intricate and beautiful piece is a Romano-Celtic silver brooch fibula that dates circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This attractive piece is approximately 1.25 inches in diameter, is .2 inches thick, and was cast as one single piece. This solid silver piece also has an added "swivel clasp mount" pin attachment on the backside of the piece. This piece is also intact, save for the thin missing attachment pin that was attached to the "swivel clasp mount". This piece has a Celtic "trumpet swirl" pattern design, and is an intricately designed piece. This piece has a dark gray patina with some minute light green cuprite deposits. Overall, this piece appears to be un-cleaned, and is in it's natural "as found" condition. This piece also hangs on a custom display stand, and can easily be worn as a pendant today. Ex: Private United Kingdom collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #594619
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,175.00
This Roman silver miniature eagle is extremely detailed, is a masterpiece of roman engraving, and dates circa 1st century B.C.- 1st century A.D. The quality and detail seen on this piece is mint to superb, and this piece probably was made by a gem engraver and/or coin die celator. This miniature silver piece is approximately 1.25 inches high, weighs approximately 11 gms, and sits on a custom clear/black plexiglas base. This piece rotates around on a small pin that is centered within a clear plexiglas post. This piece is also solid, as it was cast, then hand-worked with minute detail. This remarkable minute detail is especially seen within the wings and upturned head, and this type of workmanship reminds one of the Greek coins of Acragas, circa 472-420 B.C., that show a standing eagle in the process of devouring a captured hare. A coin such as this may have served as a model for the exceptional piece offered here, as the Roman artists strove to duplicate the earlier Greek artists. The minute detail, seen within the feathers of the wings and the tension portrayed in the neck with a slight twist, could only have been produced by a very accomplished artist. The pose of this piece is very refined from every angle, which is another point that defines this piece. The patina of this piece is aged to a light gray, which indicates that this piece has had contact with oxygen for quite some time and that it has not been recently cleaned. An exceptional piece with fine detail and one of the best Roman miniatures that has been offered. Ex: Private German collection. Ex: Private New York collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #872310
Apolonia Ancient Art
$325.00
This interesting Roman bronze coin is a bronze Sestertius, and was minted circa 60-68 A.D., and depicts a bust of Nero, who was in power circa 54-68 A.D. This coin is approximately 37mm in diameter, is Very Good quality, and has a nice dark green patina with heavy dark green/brown deposits. There are also four holes seen on this piece, and this likely facilitated leather ties which allowed this piece to be fitted into a composite corslet as scale armour. (See attached drawing.) This type of of Roman armour is known, but is extremely rare, and was not often manufactured by the Romans, although the blending of metal leaves interwoven with fabric, was known by the Greeks as early as the 12th century B.C. in Cyprus. (See "Warfare in Ancient Greece" by Tim Everson, Sutton Pub., United Kingdom, 2004, p. 154-155.) This piece could have served as armour during this period, as Rome had a brief, but quick civil war with four Emperors circa 68-69 A.D. This piece also has a deep mark in the center of the coin that was probably a test cut, rather than a battle mark. The test cut was done in order to test that the metal was 100% bronze, rather than a bronze plated "fourree". This test cut was also probably done when this coin was no longer in circulation, and could have been struck circa 68 A.D., when Nero was replaced by Galba. This coin is an interesting piece that had a dual utility. A custom black plexiglas stand is included, and the piece is easily removable as it is attached with clay. Ex: Private English collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: