Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1264405
Apolonia Ancient Art
$625.00
This mint quality piece is a Roman bronze key that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D. This piece is approximately 2 inches long, by .75 inches in diameter for the ring seen at the terminal end. This piece has a beautiful light blue to green patina with some spotty red highlights. This piece is in better condition than most examples, and is a mint quality piece with well defined groves seen at the end. This piece may have fit a personal strong box, or possibly a small door. This type of key is also published in "Handwerk und Berfude in der Romischen Stadt', by Rieche & Schalles, Cologne, 1994, pp. 46-47. This piece is a nice example of a Roman bronze that was individually owned by a Roman with some means. This piece also hangs from a custom stand, and can easily be worn today in a necklace. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1356647
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This nice Roman bronze is an eagle applique that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 2.2 inches high, by 2 inches high. This piece is a very detailed Roman eagle that has a raised head and spread wings. The wings are very detailed, and have very fine feather "line design". The head is designed with the head facing right, and is seen looking at the viewer. There is also detail on the head not facing the viewer, and there is a very defined "dotted eye". This piece has a flat back, and there is an extended mounting pin seen in the back center. This piece likely served as an applique for a vessel, and may have served as a decorative element in a military phalera, or an element in Roman armor. The military application relative to this piece is readily apparent, as the Roman eagle was the Roman symbol of the power, and was presented in many art forms within the Roman army. This attractive piece is intact, and has no repair/restoration. This piece also has a nice dark green patina with some minute red highlights, and is a fine example for the type. Another analogous example was offered by Bonham's Antiquities, London, July 1995, no. 442. (500-600 pounds estimates. See attached photo.) The nice piece offered here is also mounted on a custom display base. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Concordia Art, Las Vegas, NV., circa 1990's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1246498
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This appealing piece is a standing nude Roman bronze Jupiter that dates circa 1st-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 3.5 inches high, and stands on its belonging square plinth. This standing nude figurine is seen holding an eagle in his outstretched right hand, and is also seen in the act of throwing a lightning bolt with his raised left arm. Jupiter, also known to the ancient Greeks as Zeus, is also seen wearing a cloak draped over his neck and left shoulder. This piece has exceptional facial, hair, and body molding detail which lends this piece a great deal of eye appeal. In addition, this piece has a young, erotic body design which is a Greek convention of art, and this can be seen with the slender legs and semi-muscular designed body. This piece is complete, save for the missing eagle's head, left hand, and probable lightning bolt which may have been in the left hand. This piece has a beautiful even dark to light green glossy patina, and the exceptional glossy patina seen on this Roman bronze figurine is scarce for figurines of this type. The footed bronze plinth also has additional bronze inside, and the bronze plinth is nearly solid, which added extra weight at the bottom of the piece. This extra weight allows this piece to solidly stand in an upright position. This piece was also cast from the top up, and the figurine and bronze plinth were cast as one piece. The bearded Jupiter is seen looking away to his right, and his weight is seen on his right leg in the act of throwing his lightning bolt. An analogous example can be seen in "Master Bronzes from the Classical World" by Mitten and Doeringer, New York, 1967, no. 266. (See attached photo.) A custom black and clear Plexiglas stand is included, and this piece simply sits on the stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1246443
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This esoteric piece is a Roman bronze herm that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D. This piece is approximately 3 inches high, and has a beautiful dark green patina with some spotty dark red highlights. This piece is also complete, and has no restoration/repair. This piece has the typical Roman herm design, which is a square designed lower body, small square side handles that are seen just below the shoulders, and an attached bust seen at the top. The design of this attractive bronze is an imitation of a large marble or bronze sculpture, which was normally erected in front of private homes as a "protector type" object. The piece offered here was likely part of a private shrine that was inside of a private home or temple. What makes the design of this piece not so typical, is the realistic and young satyr head which has a young, sweet appearance. The head is seen slightly tilted to the right, and the thin neck, detailed hair, and upturned horns seen on the upper forehead is very esoteric. An analogous type/example is seen in Bonham's Antiquities, London, June 1997, no. 298. (800-1000 Pound estimates. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is a scarce example, as it has great artistic style and eye appeal. This piece stands on a custom display stand, and can be easily removed. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #872310
Apolonia Ancient Art
$325.00
This interesting Roman bronze coin is a bronze Sestertius, and was minted circa 60-68 A.D., and depicts a bust of Nero, who was in power circa 54-68 A.D. This coin is approximately 37mm in diameter, is Very Good quality, and has a nice dark green patina with heavy dark green/brown deposits. There are also four holes seen on this piece, and this likely facilitated leather ties which allowed this piece to be fitted into a composite corslet as scale armour. (See attached drawing.) This type of of Roman armour is known, but is extremely rare, and was not often manufactured by the Romans, although the blending of metal leaves interwoven with fabric, was known by the Greeks as early as the 12th century B.C. in Cyprus. (See "Warfare in Ancient Greece" by Tim Everson, Sutton Pub., United Kingdom, 2004, p. 154-155.) This piece could have served as armour during this period, as Rome had a brief, but quick civil war with four Emperors circa 68-69 A.D. This piece also has a deep mark in the center of the coin that was probably a test cut, rather than a battle mark. The test cut was done in order to test that the metal was 100% bronze, rather than a bronze plated "fourree". This test cut was also probably done when this coin was no longer in circulation, and could have been struck circa 68 A.D., when Nero was replaced by Galba. This coin is an interesting piece that had a dual utility. A custom black plexiglas stand is included, and the piece is easily removable as it is attached with clay. Ex: Private English collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1150627
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This superb Roman bronze is an applique that shows a facing Diana with a bow quiver on her back. This piece dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 4.5 inches high. This piece is complete, and shows a facing bust of Diana, the Roman goddess of the hunt. She is seen with a bow quiver strapped across her back, with the quiver straps running between her breasts, and is draped with a chiton and an animal skin cloak that is seen hanging from her left shoulder across her left breast. Her hair is tied into an intricate headdress with a large ribbon, and she is seen looking slightly to her left. Her eyes may have been inlayed with silver, precious stones, or more likely, colored pastes. This attractive bust of Diana displays a very serene face, and has very pleasing eye appeal. There is a punched pattern that runs around the flat base frame, and this bottom base frame is in the shape of a crescent moon. This crescent moon frames the bottom section of this bust, and also alludes to this goddess. This piece also has an attachment pin that is seen on the upper back side of the piece. Diana was the Roman equivalent of Artemis, the Greek goddess of the hunt, and for the Romans, Diana was also the goddess of light, mountains, and woods. One of her principle temples in the ancient Roman world was on the shores of Lake Nemi, south of Rome. The piece offered here has a nice light green and brown patina with some red highlights, along with some spotty light brown and white mineral deposits. This piece likely was a decorative element that may have fit on a Roman furniture piece or box. (For the type see Babelon-Blanchet, "Catalogue des Bronzes Antiques de la Bibliotheque Nationale", Paris, 1895, nos. 140 and 176.) This piece was also cast as one piece, and has hand punched and chased details. (Another analogous example is seen in "Art of the Ancient World", Royal Athena Galleries, New York, 1985, no. 312.) This piece sits on an attractive custom marble and plexiglas stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private French collection. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1357890
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This complete and detailed piece is a Roman bronze eagle that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 2 inches high, by 1.75 inches wide, and is intact with no restoration/repair. This piece is a standing Roman eagle that is seen looking left, and has very realistic features. This piece has very detailed feathers seen on the outstretched wings, and well-defined dotted eyes. This piece also has a beautiful dark green patina, and has a great deal of eye appeal. This piece was likely in a private Roman shrine known as a "lararium", and may also have been worshipped by a Roman legionnaire, as the Roman eagle represented Rome itself and was the symbol of the Roman military. This realistic piece also stands on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1209679
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This interesting little piece is a Roman bronze scale weight that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 2.1 inches high by 1.4 inches wide. This piece appears to be a young cherub, with a rounded chubby face, pudgy nose, and slight smile. The eyes are also beaded silver inlay, and the beaded silver eyes lend this piece a great deal of eye appeal. There is also an attached hoop at the top which attached this piece to a scale. This piece was likely filled with lead, and this piece served as a scale weight. This piece has a dark green patina, and is an exceptional example. This piece also hangs from a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1226370
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This beautiful piece is a Graeco-Roman bronze that dates circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This complete piece is approximately 3.5 inches high, and stands by itself on it's own base. This type of nude female Graco-Roman piece is known as the "Aphrodite Anadyomene", whose name signifies the birth of the goddess from the foam of the sea. The Greek goddess Aphrodite was born from the sea foam created when the severed genitals of Uranus were cast into the sea. Like many other naked figures of the goddess Aphrodite, the "Anadyomene" was not posed to conceal the body, and has arms raised to the hair which exposes the body to the gaze. In the Hellenistic and Roman periods, each hand is seen lifting and/or wringing the wet hair strands that hang down to the shoulders, as Aphrodite was seen rising from the sea at her birth. Her head is also seen slightly bent, her face is generally seen with a long straight nose with a small mouth, and she usually has wide hips and thighs. All of these features noted above create an impression of youthful fertility, and portray Aphrodite as having eternal youth and beauty. The piece offered here displays all of these features, and in addition, the "Aphrodite Anadyomene" is portrayed in a "contrapposto pose", with the weight carried on one leg with a slight twist to the waist. For the type, see Margarete Bieber, "The Sculpture of the Hellenistic Age", New York: Columbia University Press, 1955. The piece offered here has the features attributed to the "Aphrodite Anadyomene" sculptural type as noted above, including the rolled hair that is seen coiled into a bun with a small tie at the front. The piece seen here is an exceptional example of the type, as the face is very sensual with the long nose and slight smile. This piece is also complete, is cast with it's own base, and is intact with a beautiful dark green patina with red highlights. This piece is scarce on the market in this complete and superb condition, and it also sits on an included custom Plexiglas stand. Ex: Frank Sternberg collection, Zurich, Switzerland, circa 1980's. Ex: Antiqua Ancient Art, Los Angeles, CA. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre 1492 item #1224239
Apolonia Ancient Art
$7,685.00
This superb Roman bronze of Attis dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and is approximately 5 inches high by 3.5 inches high. This piece is in superb to mint condition, and is complete with no repair/restoration. This piece also has silver inlaid eyes which add to the lively and animated facial expression of this exceptional Roman bronze. This piece also has a beautiful dark green patina with some minute black mineral deposits, fine hair detail, and a finely designed Phrygian cap. There is a round hook at the back of the neck which may have been attached to a suspension chain, as this piece may have been part of a suspended bronze vessel or a furniture object. There is additional detail with incised dotted decorative crosses and line work seen on each side of the Phyrgian cap, which is also an attribute associated with the deity Attis. The head of this piece is also modeled in the round, and extends slightly forward from the lower bust, and this is another indication that this piece was likely attached to a rounded vessel. In addition, the majority of Roman applique pieces are not modeled in the round in the upper section like the example offered here, and simply have an open end at the back of the head. This piece therefore has a dual design, not only as an applique, but it is also designed like a Roman portrait bust. According to Phyrgian and Roman myth, the youth Attis was madly loved by the Phyrgian goddess Cybele, and she loved him so jealously that she could not bear him marrying the nymph Sagaritis. When Attis later proposed to Sagaritis, in a rage, she made him go out of his mind, and he castrated himself and died from his wound. Cybele, struck with grief, revived her dead lover and the pair were worshipped together throughout Phrygia and the Roman world. In a Lydian version of the myth, Attis is not killed by his castration, but by a wild boar, like Adonis. For the myth of Attis and Cybele see: "Gods and Mortals in Classical Mythology" by Michael Grant, New York, 1979. The lively and animated face seen on this appealing piece, reveals the mad love that Attis had for Cybele and Sagaritis, and as such, this piece displays a high degree of art. This piece hangs on a custom black plexiglas and steel stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the buyer. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #599095
Apolonia Ancient Art
$965.00
This superb Roman bronze piece is an applique with the image of Silenus. This piece dates circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D., and is in the form of a facing head, with an attached peg that extends about 1.5 inches from the back side of the applique. This piece was probably mounted in an object such as a furniture piece, or a bronze and wooden door, or a composite work or arms such as a Roman shield. A piece with this type of design, with the extended peg, could have fit in a number of objects. The Sileni were native not to Greece, but to Phrygia in Roman Asia, and personified the genii of springs and rivers. Unlike the Satyrs who derive chiefly from the he-goat, the Sileni derive rather from the horse, whose tail hooves, and even ears they possess. This piece clearly shows the horse ears and shows Silenus as a fat old man, snub-nosed, always drunk, who was in the retinue of Dionysus. Silenus was the tutor of Dionysus and had helped him form his character. The diameter of this piece is approximately 1.4 inches and the length is approximately 2 inches. This piece has a dark green patina with red highlights and the detail is superb. There are some dark green mineral deposits seen on the extended peg. This piece is mounted with clay on a custom black/plexiglas base and can easily be removed. Ex: Private German collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #665966
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This Roman bronze portrait bust dates circa 2nd century A.D., and is the terminal end for a leg that served as a table support for a folding tripod. These Roman bronze tripods were portable and moved with the Roman armies and/or wealthy families. This piece had a L-shaped hook at the back that supported a caldron that was at the center of the tripod. This piece is in the form of a portrait bust, and may depict the young Roman emperor Caracalla. This bust also has an attribute relative to Herakles, as the figure is seen wearing a lion's skin cloak. The face has a short cropped beard, a rounded nose, and a wide forehead which are prominent features of Caracalla. The head is slightly turned to the right as are many Roman marble portrait busts during this period. The hair is seen as thick rounded curls which may indicate a wig, as Caracalla was known to have worn a golden haired wig that was arranged in the German style. Caracalla was born in 188 A.D., and in 213 A.D. as emperor, he left Rome for Germany and defeated the Alamanni on the upper Rhine River. Caracalla often wore a flowing Gallic cloak which gave him his nickname, and the bust seen here shows a lion's skin cloak that is not only an attribute of Herakles, but is also an attribute of Alexander the Great. After Caracalla's victories in Germany, he planned an invasion of the Parthian east, and in 214 A.D., he mustered a great army for this oriental expedition, including a phalanx of sixteen thousand men, clothed and equipped like the Macedonians of old. Caracalla liked to see himself as a new Alexander the Great, and this may explain the lion's skin cloak seen on this piece. Caracalla met his end in 216 A.D., near Edessa in Media, and was stabbed to death by supporters of Macrinus. This piece may be a portrait of Caracalla for the reasons noted above, and there is a strong possibility that this stylized image is an image of Caracalla as seen in the guise of Alexander the Great. (The portraiture of Alexander the Great is noteworthy for the wide range of styles that were employed to portray his unique physiognomy. The treatment of the hair, for example, can be long and wavy, while others emphasize the cowlick seen above the forehead which is known as the "anastole". This "anastole" can be seen on the piece offered here, with the hair raising up as a curl from the center of the forehead. For several examples of this hair style see F. Antonovich, "Les Metamorphoses divines d'Alexander", Paris, 1996.) This bust is also analogous to the marble bust of Caracalla that is seen in the Staatliche Museen in Berlin, Germany. (See "The Art of Rome" by Bernard Andreae, Abrams Pub., New York, 1977, no. 551.) This marble bust dates circa 212 A.D., and was created on the occasion of Caracalla becoming sole ruler. This marble bust also has large hair curls and bare arms/upper chest, as seen in the bronze bust offered here. This piece is approximately 3 inches high and is mounted on a custom stand. This piece has a superb dark green patina with spotty dark red highlights. Ex: American private collection. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities New York, Dec. 2006, no. 122. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: