Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
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All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1308509
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This rare piece is a Greco-Roman bronze bust of a bald grotesque figurine that dates to the late Hellenistic Period, circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 1 inch high, and is a superb example with a nice even dark green patina. This piece was likely a bottle stopper and/or may have fitted into a long-necked glass or bronze vessel. The bottom of the stem appears to have been broken, and this piece may have had a longer stem that could have extended down into the vessel. This piece may also have had gold or silver gilt, and may possibly have been a garment or hair pin. Regardless of what this piece could have been, it was certainly made to have been seen, and the bald head and deformed features of this "grotesque bust" is very noticeable. This interesting piece has ears that are lop-sided, with one higher than the other, deep sunken eyes, and a very a very large nose. This portrait may also represent an actual individual that was born with these deformities, and may have been created to represent an actual person rather than a fantasy individual. It is also possible that this deformed person may have been the subject of a play, and may have represented a type of actor. An analogous piece with a near identical portrait, and described as a "Dancing Grotesque of Mine", is seen in "Master Bronzes from the Classical World", by Mittien and Doeringer, Fogg Art Museum Pub., 1968, no. 122. (This published piece has an identical portrait as the piece offered here, and is bald except for a lock at the crown. This near nude figurine is also posed in a vigorous dance, and is a dancer that likely held castanet-like clappers. This piece is also described as having "contorted contours and exaggerated features which embody the Hellenistic love of caricature", and is "allegedly from Alexandria". See attached photo.) The portrait seen on this published piece, and the piece offered here is nearly identical, and both pieces were likely produced in an Alexandrian workshop. The rare piece offered here also sits on the custom display stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1304124
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This interesting piece is a silver Greco-European "spectacle fibula" that dates to the Geometric Period, circa 8th-7th century B.C. This piece is approximately 2.4 inches long, by 1.4 inches high, and is intact with no repair/restoration. This piece was made from one hammered strand of silver, and was made by creating a wire spiral that begins and ends at the center of each spiral. This piece is also very solid, as the diameter of the silver strand is about 1/16 inch on the average. The area between both spirals forms a clip that likely held rolls of hair in place, so this piece served as a functional, as well as a decorative type of piece. This piece has an attractive light gray patina, along with some minute spotty dark green mineral deposits seen mostly on "Side B" of the piece. (An analogous example was offered in Bonham's Antiquities, London, Oct. 2012, no. 218, 500-600 Pound estimates.) Silver examples of this type are relatively scarce on the market, especially in the intact condition offered here. This piece hangs on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1360771
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This Greek Thasos silver tetradrachm is mint state (FDC) to superb quality grade (EF+/EF+), and dates circa 2nd-1st century B.C. This superb graded example is approximately 33mm wide, and weighs 17.1 grams. This coin is also perfectly centered, and is struck in high relief. This attractive piece shows on the obverse (Obv.) a young bust of Dionysus facing right, wearing a detailed ivy leaf wreath with grape leaves and bunches. This ivy and grape leaf wreath, seen in the flowing hair of Dionysus, is also more detailed that what is usually seen as well. The artistic style of the young Dionysus is very fine, as the face conveys a young sweet Dionysus with wide open eyes and an open mouth, which are earlier Greek Hellenistic period conventions of art. The reverse (Rev.) shows a very muscular nude standing Herakles, holding a club in the right hand, and over the left arm, the cloak made from the skin of the Nemean Lion. The Greek lettering to the right reads "HERAKLES"; and below reads "THASOS", which also refers to the island Thasos where this coin was likely minted. This coin type is also classified as a Celtic imitation of the Thasos types, but this coin has a fine artistic style and was likely minted on the island of Thasos, and may also have been minted for trade with the Thracian interior. The depiction of the Thracian wine god Dionysus was a perfect choice for Thracian trade, as the worship of Dionysus was very widespread and ancient Thrace. This coin is a choice example, and has better artistic style that what is usually seen. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. References: Sear 1759; BMC 74; SNG Cop 1046. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1359591
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,375.00
This exceptional piece is a Greek silver fibula that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 4th-3rd century B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 2.2 inches long, by 1.6 inches wide. This piece also has a beautiful light gray patina, and some minute spotty black mineral deposits. This finely detailed piece is a solid example, and was made in sections, and was also designed with an acanthus design seen at one terminal end. The other terminal end has two raised knobs with a hoop between, and this raised hoop likely held a leather tie so that this fibula would not have been lost by the wearer. This piece was expensive in antiquity, and was worn only by a wealthy individual. This piece also displays five "paddle wheel" decorative elements, and each of these decorative elements have six raised knobs. The overall design of this attractive piece is very intricate, which also lends this piece a great deal of eye appeal. This type of piece was also used in place of a button to fasten the sleeves of the Greek chiton. (For the type and use see: "Greek Jewellery, 6,000 Years of Tradition", 1997, Athens, no. 78.) Another near identical example is also seen in the Metropolitan Museum, New York, Inventory no. 52.36. The exceptional piece offered here is one of the finest recorded examples, and is complete, save for the missing ultra-thin attachment pin. This piece is also attached to a custom display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1340042
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This complete piece is a Greek silver neck section for a vessel, and dates circa 5th-4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 4 inches diameter, by 2.8 inches high. This piece is slightly oval in shape, and has slightly sloping sides. This piece has exceptional workmanship, and was hammered into shape from one solid sheet of silver. In addition, this piece has an extremely detailed beaded lip border, with minute beading which only a skilled artist could have produced. This piece was made as a section for a large silver vessel such as a hydria, or a stamnos, and both of these vessel types had an extended neck that reached upwards from the main body of the vessel, along with handles that were attached to the main body of the vessel. This pieced may also have been produced for fitting into a ceramic vessel body, and although this is rare, it is a known type of use. This piece likely was never used, and could have been made as a votive type use, and was never intended for use in real life. This piece also could have been produced for use into a silver vessel at a later time, as was perhaps lost in the production process, or became war booty that was hoarded away. Whatever the case, this piece is a rare example as a section such as this, and is an excellent case study as to how a complete silver vessel could have been produced. This piece also appears to be a complete neck section, with no apparent cut marks showing in the lower edge, although there is some lower edge roughness that is to be expected. This piece also has an attractive dark to light gray patina, and there are some sections that have spotty dark to light black mineral deposits, along with some additional minute mineralization and root marking. This type of piece is seldom seen on the market, and is an exceptional example for the type. This piece also sits on a custom metal and Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Private New Jersey collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1170376
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This superb little piece is a Greek Attic stemless kylix ceramic that dates circa 480-470 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.25 inches wide from handle to handle, and is approximately 2.1 inches high. This piece is also intact, is in mint quality condition, and has a multi-colored patina over an even deep black glaze. This multi-colored patina also compares with the finest examples that are normally seen for an Attic black glazed vessel of this type. This nice Greek Attic ceramic also has a nice brilliant deep black glaze on the inside of the bowl. There is an inconspicuous area, centered just below where one of the handles is attached to the main body of the vessel, and this is where an incised double "lambda" Greek letter symbol is seen. The ancient Greek "lambda" letter subsequently developed into letters in other alphabets including the Latin "L". These small letters and/or symbols are approximately .18 and.2 inches high, and may have been added to this piece to denote the owner, and/or perhaps how this piece was used in trade. In addition, these marks could have been used as a price notation and/or as a mark to denote a master vase of a group production. According to John Boardman in "The History of Greek Vases", Thames and Hudson Pub., London 2001, p. 154: "It seems to have been in the potter's yard that marks were made on the pots to identify their eventual carrier." In addition, Boardman states: "Most of these merchant marks are seen on vases of around 570 to 450 B.C., the period of busiest Athenian export..". A.W. Johnson in "Trademarks on Greek Vases", Aris & Philips Ltd., Wiltshire, U.K., 1979, pp. 5-6, states that: "A number of the marks are relatively inconspicuous, including those on the handle and some on the shoulder in the vicinity of the handle.....and there can be little doubt that these are trademarks." Types 2F and 6F, seen in the above reference, is also a close match seen on the vessel offered here. According to Johnson on pp. 4-7, Johnson states that the overall number of incised marks seen on these vessels is paltry, compared to those vessels with marks that are seen under foot. He also adds that these incised marks may also represent "batch" production marks, and that one vessel was marked to indicate the entire group of vessels that were possibly produced for export. It is also interesting to note that one of the "lambda" letters/symbols is slightly smaller than the other letter/symbol, and may represent a tally mark for a "batch" of vessels. This interesting piece also has an offset lip, as seen with the line that runs around the bowl, and is classified as being part of the Attic "Inset Lip Class, circa 480-470 B.C.". For the discussion of the type as a whole see: "The Athenian Agora, Vol. 12", by B. Sparkes and L. Talcott, Princeton University, 1970. This exceptional piece has some minute white calcite deposits, seen mostly on the bottom of the vessel, and a light red band seen above and below the bottom base ring. This interesting piece is scarce to rare, especially in this intact condition, and is a superb example with rare trade symbols that are not often seen on vessels of this type. Ex: Private Swiss collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1356502
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This mint quality and extra large Greek Attic vessel is a "glaux type" skyphos that dates circa 475-450 B.C. In the Beazley Archive of vessel shapes, this type of vessel is also classified as a "Type B" skyphos. This large vessel is approximately 7.25 inches wide from handle to handle, and is 3.5 inches high. This piece is much larger than other examples of this type, and it has a larger field on each side of the vessel for the painted decorative elements that are seen on this attractive vessel. These decorative elements are two standing owls, which are each framed by two olive sprays, and are seen on each side of the vessel. Each of the standing owls are approximately 2.7 inches high, which is also the approximate height that this type of vessel is usually found. This piece also has a very distinctive design feature, which is that one handle is seen attached to the vessel in a vertical fashion, and the other in a horizontal fashion. This handle design also refers to the common name that this type of vessel is known as, and this vessel type is often referred to as a "glaux shyphos". This esoteric vessel also has a rim wall that curves gently inward towards the rim, a single black centering circle seen on the bottom of the footed base, and a row of dots that frames the face of each owl. Each owl also has short stubby legs, and straight lines that form the design of the wing that is facing the viewer. These design features are also found on the standing owls that are seen on the silver coinage of Athens that is contemporary with the vessel offered here. In addition, the composition seen on this piece is balanced on a ground line that circles the piece. The standing owl was also sacred to Athena, who was the patron goddess for the city of Athens. It may also be likely that the type of vessel offered here may have had a ceremonial and/or ritual purpose, and was offered as a votive type vessel. This may also explain why this vessel is in mint condition, with no cracks or chips, and is seen in it's pristine "as found" condition. This beautiful piece also has some spotty white calcite deposits, seen mostly in the low relief sections of the vessel, and a vibrant deep black glaze that highlights the design features that are rendered in a dark orange color. Another analogous vessel of this type, and of the more common smaller size, was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, 2016; Ex J.M.E. collection, Sotheby's London, May 1987. (See attached photo.) The piece offered here is an exceptional example seldom seen in this size and condition. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1388453
Apolonia Ancient Art
$385.00
This appealing piece is a Greek terracotta bust that dates circa 4th-3rd century B.C., and is approximately 3 inches high. This large bust is intact, save a small edge chip around the vent hole hole rim seen at the back of the head, and is a terracotta that likely represents a goddess such as Demeter. This goddess is also seen wearing an elaborate and thick diadem, and has a very serene face. Demeter was the mother of Persephone who was responsible for the change of seasons, and the "rebirth" of crops during the year. This piece is in it's natural "as found" condition, and has some spotty earthen and mineral deposits. This piece is a pleasing example for the type, and is mounted on a custom steel and Plexiglas display stand with a total height of approximately 4.7 inches. Ex: Munzen and Medaillen AG, Basel, Switzerland, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1299352
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This beautiful x-large Greek Apulian ceramic is a knob-handled patera plate that dates circa 340-330 B.C. This extremely large piece is approximately 18.2 inches wide from handle to handle, by 6.5 inches high, and is attributed to the Ganymede Painter. This piece is also larger than most examples of this type, and is a superb intact example that is 100% original. The overall condition of this piece is superb to mint quality, save for some minor glaze checkering on the inside surface, and some minor and minute stress cracks which are all normal for an ancient Greek ceramic of this size. This piece also has some minute root marking seen mostly on the bottom base stem, and attractive heavy spotty white calcite deposits that are seen on various sections of the vessel. This piece has not been over-cleaned, and is in it's natural "as found" condition, which is scarce for a vessel of this size; and in addition, what is also not often seen is that this piece also has very vibrant black, dark orange, yellow, and white colors. This piece has two decorative black raised handles attached on each side of the raised flat rim, and in addition, there are four raised knobs attached to the flat rim which are seen on each side of each handle. There is an additional knob seen in the top middle of each handle as well. These knobs are also very decorative, and may have served in antiquity as an additional hand grip on the vessel, as this type of vessel was typically used to pour libations. The center of this beautiful plate has a draped seated woman seen seated on a rock, and is holding a plate and floral garland. She is facing a standing nude youth that is seen showing an open box, and is holding a wreath in his right hand. The drapery seen on her body is very detailed and translucent, which lends this figure an erotic look. The entire scene is also balanced with each figure holding an object away from the center of the scene, and in this case, the standing nude youth is seen holding a wreath, and the draped seated woman is holding a garland which balance the scene of the overall composition. Both figures are seen on a "dot-and-egg" pattern band that is seen below a minute "dotted" ground line, and the entire scene is seen within a sacred white olive-leaf wreath that frames the entire scene. The underside of this beautiful plate has a black reserve, with a raised footed base. The Ganymede painter was one of the best accomplished Greek Apulian artists during the second half of the 4th century B.C., and according to A.D. Trendall in "Red Figure Vases of South Italy and Sicily", Thames and Hudson, London, 1989, p. 96: "His drawing is more fluid and his youths have a softer look. He is fond of figures holding fans, open boxes and cistae, divided by two diagonal lines." The piece offered here is a fine example of the Ganymede Painter, and knob-handled patera by this painter are scarce to rare. This piece has a very high degree of eye appeal and is scarce to rare on the market, due to it's condition, esoteric design, and that it has been attributed to the Ganymede Painter, which is rarer than the scarce examples by the Darius-Underworld and the White Sakkos Painters. (A recent example was sold by Christie's Antiquities, London, April 2014, for 9373.00 Pounds/$15,591.00 USD realized. Attributed to the Darius-Underworld Painter, circa 330 B.C., 14.75 inches diameter, 8,000.00-12,000.00 Pounds estimates.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1354392
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This superb piece is a Greek bronze oinochoe that dates circa mid 5th century B.C. This complete piece is approximately 6 inches high, and is an intact example with no repair/restoration. This intact piece is in superb to mint condition, with only some very minor scrapes and minute dents, which makes it much better than what is normally seen on the market. This piece has a flat bottom and easily stands by itself, and has a graceful upper shoulder and extended neck that runs up into a trefoil spout. This piece also has an added handle that is solid, and attaches to the main body of the piece and at the top of the trefoil spout. This piece was hand beaten from one sheet of bronze and graduates in thickness from the bottom to the spout lip which is at it's thinnest point. The piece also has a beautiful and even dark green patina with some dark brown, light blue, and red highlights, and in addition, there is some attractive minute root marking. The workmanship of this piece is exceptional, and this piece has a very graceful and compact shape. The shape and/or form of this vessel is also seen relative to numerous ceramic examples that copy it's graceful size and shape. This piece was used for fine dining, and likely held a concentrated wine that was mixed with water. This piece also made it very easy to pour a liquid, as the trefoil spout could pour a liquid in three directions. A piece with a great deal of eye appeal, and is scarce in the market in this superb condition. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is included for the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1321881
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This attractive ancient Greek coin is a Sikyon silver stater that dates circa 350-330 B.C. This coin is approximately 23 mm wide, weighs 11.8 gms, and is in good very fine/extremely fine condition (VF+/EF). This coin also has a light gray patina, perfect centering, and excellent metal, with some minute roughness seen mostly on the high relief sections of the obverse and reverse. This attractive coin features on the obverse the mythical creature Chimaera, facing left, with the letter "I" seen below the belly of the creature that is seen standing/walking on a ground line. The reverse features a dove flying left, with the letter "N" below the beak; all within a laurel wreath. The Chimaera was a celebrated monster who sprung from the union of Echidna and Typhon, and had three heads; those of a lion, a goat, and a dragon. The Greek hero Bellerophon with the support of Minerva, and the aid of the winged horse Pegasus, attacked and killed the Chimaera in an epic battle. The image of Chimaera, seen on the obverse of this coin, has a goat neck and head rising from it's back, and the head and body of a lion. The city of Sikyon chose this creature as a civic symbol, and is one of the few known images of this creature seen on ancient Greek coinage. This coin type is also highly desirable among collectors of ancient Greek coinage who collect coins that illustrate creatures known from ancient Greek myth. References: BMC 57. SNG Copenhagen 48. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, circa 1980's. I certify that this coin is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1335899
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This superb Greek bronze is a solid cast handle with the top section of an oinochoe that dates to the late Archaic Period, circa 520-490 B.C., and is approximately 8 inches high by 5.25 inches in diameter. This piece consists of the upper part of a bronze oinochoe, and it has an amazing designed lion handle that has exceptional detail. This handle was cast as one piece and is very solid. The handle also has a well defined acanthus palmette design at the terminal end, and is solidly attached to the main body of the vessel. The handle has a detailed lion's main which runs up the handle, and away from the realistic designed lion's head that is seen with an open mouth and an extended tongue. The realistic design of the lions head is truly a great work of art, as the minute design is very fine and has exquisite realistic features. This facing lion's head is seen facing the inner spout of the vessel, and this design is a Greek "Archaic Period" convention of art. This impressive piece also has a dainty ivy leaf and tendril floral pattern that is seen running around the neck of the vessel. This beautiful piece also has an exceptional dark green/blue patina, and some light to dark brown deposits. Another analogous example was offered in Christie's Antiquities, Leo Mildenberg collection, Dec. 2011, no. 98. ($4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates, $5000.00 realized. This piece does not have the detail, nor the superb artistic style of the superb vessel offered here.) The piece offered here is an exceptional "Archaic Period" Greek bronze, and is seldom seen on the market. A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1230491
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This attractive piece is a Greek bronze applique that dates circa 3rd-2nd century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.6 inches high by 3.7 inches wide, and is a complete example. This piece is composed of two overlapping palmette fronds which are seen emerging from a central raised bowl. There is a spiral tendril, seen below the raised bowl, which each extend to each side of the decorative raised bowl. This piece was likely part of a bronze vessel such as a hydria, or possibly a oinochoe, and served purely as a decorative element. This piece was attached with a pin, and the piece is slightly curved from top to bottom. This concave shape allowed this piece to extend away from the surface of the object it was attached to, and this gave this piece a great deal of added eye appeal. This complete piece has a lovely dark green patina with some spotty dark red highlights, some dark green/brown mineral deposits, and is an attractive intact example. This type of decorative anthemion element was also seen on buildings and Attic grave stele. For the type, see C. Clairmont, "Classical Attic Tombstones, vol. II", Kilchberg, 1993. A custom wooden and Plexiglas stand is included, and the piece can simply lift off of the stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1337548
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,265.00
This impressive piece is a Graeco-Roman Hellenistic silver necklace that dates circa 2nd century B.C.-1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 21 inches in length, and is made from several interwoven strands of silver in an intricate design, resulting in a massive thick chain that is approximately .4 inches in diameter. This intricate silver piece also has two cylindrical terminals that cap each end of the chain, each decorated with looped band enclosures with raised "wire-rope" pattern designs. The "wire-rope" pattern design is also a Greek Hellenistic convention of art that is seen on ancient Greek gold and silver jewelry for the period. The two cylindrical terminals in turn connect to a bronze clasp that securely closes the necklace on the wearer. There is also a central movable pendant that has applied dots and an additional raised "wire-rope" pattern. The central movable pendant may also have framed a carved gem or perhaps an ancient coin. This piece could have only been owned by a wealthy individual in antiquity, as it has an extremely high degree of workmanship and was made from a very valuable material. This piece was also very impressive in antiquity, as it has a very high degree of eye appeal, and as such, was likely worn by a woman who wanted to impress her peers. There is an ancient repair on the right side of the chain, and this may have been broken and repaired due to civil unrest. Another near identical example of this piece is the example offered in Christie's Antiquities, London, Oct. 2006, no. 62. (3,500.00-5,500.00 Pounds estimates.) The Christie's example cited above is also from the same collection as the piece offered here, and in addition, both of these pieces may have been produced in the same workshop. Both of these silver pieces are also analogous to the example seen in "Ancient Gold: The Wealth of the Thracians" by I. Marazov, New York, 1998, p. 117, no. 36. The beautiful piece offered here may also be easily worn today with some minor restoration, and a carved gem or coin can easily be added into the central hoop. This piece is also an exceptional collectable as an ancient piece of jewelry, and is an important collectable as is. This piece also has an attractive dark gray patina, and the bronze hoop also has an attractive dark green patina. This solid piece can also be modified with a modern clasp, and can easily be worn today. A custom display necklace case is also included. Ex: Private German collection, Krefeld, Germany, circa 1970's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1182861
Apolonia Ancient Art
$965.00
This piece is a Greek bronze finger ring that dates to the Hellenistic period, circa late 4th century B.C. This piece is approximately ring size 7.5, and likely was made for a young man or woman. This piece has a flat face, with a beveled back face, and an attached ring hoop. This intact piece is very solid, is in superb to mint condition, and can easily be worn today. The back beveled face also allows this piece to easily slip on and off the finger. There is some slight wear to the back face, and this is a good indication that this piece was worn by a living person, and simply was not solely a votive object. This piece has sharp engraving, and the engraved composition has detailed deep relief. This piece shows a flying Nike facing left, and a seated draped woman below who may represent Ledo. The flying Nike was the Greek god of victory, and this example has wings above and is holding a victory wreath in front. The Nike is in the act of crowning the victor with the wreath, and this is a Greek Hellenistic convention of art that is seen on Hellenistic coinage and objects. The seated woman who may represent Leto, made love to Zeus, and she bore him the great archer-deities Apollo and his sister Artemis. The combination of these two symbols seen on this ring is very powerful, and likely offered the wearer "victory in life". This attractive ring may have been used used a personal signet seal ring as well, as it makes a sharp impression. (See the attached photos showing the ring impression that was done in soft clay.) This ring has a nice dark green patina with some minute dark brown mineral deposits. This piece is a superb example for the type, and is a scarce example. (For the type, see J. Spier, "Ancient Gems and Finger Rings", Malibu, 1992, no. 85.) A custom black velvet ring stand is included. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #615970
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This rare piece is an early Greek terracotta that dates circa 6th century B.C. This piece is an applique that depicts a male that is seen wearing a conical hat, which was a royal symbol in the Achaemenid (Persian) Period circa 800-330 B.C. This piece is probably from Cyprus which was heavily influenced by the Achaemenid Empire circa 6th century B.C., but the artistic style of this piece is Greek. This piece has a portrait that is very analogous to the Greek marble Kouros from Melos, circa 555-540 B.C., that is now seen in the Athens National Museum. (See Gisela Richter, "A handbook of Greek Art", Da Capo Press, Inc., New York, 1987, p.63-64.) According to Richter: "In this general period appear also a few draped male figures, evidently intended to represent not athletes but important personages. They have come to light in Samos and elsewhere and show marked Ionic (Greek) influence". The artistic style of this terracotta is an extremely fine example of the Ionic Greek style that shows a receding chin, almond eyes, and a slight smile. This period of art was a step towards naturalistic representation, and moved away from a strict geometric representation of the human form. This Greek artistic style is only seen approximately over a sixty year time frame, and is rarely seen in Greek marbles, but is seen more relative to Greek terracottas, as many of these terracottas were votive in nature. This may be the case with this piece, and it is a rare example, not only for the high degree of art that is seen, but also because it also has a regal element relative to the conical hat that may depict a royal personage. The conical hat is also very analogous to the hat seen on the colossal stone bust of Antiochos I of Kommagene, circa 64-38 B.C., that is seen at Nemrud Dagh, Turkey. The mixture of Iranian and Greek elements, in both the blood and names of the rulers of Kommagene, was also reflected in their monumental art. The terracotta seen here is also a mix of an eastern type with Greek artistic style, and as such, is a rare form of ancient Greek art that is seldom seen on the market today. This piece is approximately 3.5 inches high and has traces of white pigment. This piece is also intact and is mounted on a custom stand. Ex: Private German collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1304461
Apolonia Ancient Art
$685.00
This group of Greco-Roman ceramics date circa 4th century B.C.-1st century A.D. All of these pieces are intact, and have no restoration/repair. This group are mainly household type wares, as they were likely used for everyday use, and this varied group has: (1) Greek blackware skyphos, approximately 7 inches wide from handle to handle, by 2 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (1) Greek Apulian dish, approximately 4.2 inches in diameter, by 1.5 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (2) Greek Apulian blackware lekythos, approximately 3.2 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (1) Greek aryballos brown/black bottle, approximately 3.4 inches high, circa 3rd-2nd century B.C. (1) Greek footed red ware olpe, approximately 3.5 inches high, circa 4th-3rd century B.C. (1) Roman red terracotta oil lamp, circa 1st century A.D. This group is a nice collection with a wide variety of types and shapes. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1990's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1246377
Apolonia Ancient Art
$5,675.00
This mint quality piece is a large Greek "Messapian" column krater that dates circa 4th century B.C. This appealing and large scale piece is approximately 14.7 inches high, by 13 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is intact, and is mint quality with no repair and/or restoration. This piece has a dark brown glaze with cream colored highlights, and has an attractive wave pattern seen on the upper shoulder. In addition, this piece has two lines seen on the body above the raised footed base, and has a dark brown line pattern seen on the upper flat rim. This piece is a much better example than what is normally seen, as the dark brown glaze seen on the majority of these large scale pieces is mostly worn away. The reason for this, is that the dark brown glaze is very thin, and was applied simply as a "wash type" glaze over the light tan clay before it was fired in the kiln. However, the attractive dark brown glaze, seen on the exceptional piece offered here, is mostly intact. This type of "Messapian" piece is also much rarer than the more common Greek "Apulian" and "Lucanian" column-krater types, and according to A.D. Trendall in "The Art of South Italy: Vases from Magna Graecia", Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, 1982, p. 18: "The shapes used for South Italian vases in the fifth century were largely derived from Attic models (see Glossary of Shapes); later, some local forms were introduced, amoung which the most characteristic are the nestoris or trozzella (in Lucanian, e.g., cat. nos. 4, 10, and 11, and Apulian, e.g., cat. no. 134), which seems to have been of native, probably Messapian origin, and the bail-amphora (in Campanian e.g., cat. no. 90, where it goes back to the black-figure prototypes of the sixth century). Many shapes are common to all fabrics (e.g., bell-and calyx-kraters, lekanides, hydriai, lebetes gamikoi, oinochoai, skyphoi); for others there were decided local preferences. Thus the loutrophoros and phiale (dish) are confined to Apulia; the volute-krater, column-krater, Panathenaic amphora, pelike, kantharos, and rhyton are rarely found outside of Apulia and Lucania; the neck amphora, bottle, and skyphoid pyxis are common only in the western fabrics." The piece offered here is also likely votive, and this also explains it's mint quality condition. The bottom is also closed, and this vessel may have held a votive offering such as grain for use in the afterlife. This piece has some heavy white calcite deposits and some minute root marking, as this attractive column-krater is in mint "as found" condition. This piece is also classified as being "Messapian", which refers to the geographical region of southern Italy near and around ancient Taranto on the Adriatic coast. Pottery classified as "Messapian" also refers to native and/or non-Greek pottery in southern Italy, along with the "Peucetian" and "Daunian" types, but this classification is a bit of a misnomer, as it is probable that "Messapian" ceramics were produced by Greek artists for the local non-Greek populace. This may also explain why this type of large-scale "Messapian" piece is rare, and is seldom seen on the market. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, and is an exceptional decorative object. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: