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All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1119679
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$965.00
This rare ancient Greek coin is a silver tetradrachm that was minted by Seleukos I, circa 305-290 B.C., weighs approximately 15.8 gms, and is in Extremely Fine/Good Very Fine condition (EF/VF+). Seleukos I was a general under Alexander the Great, and established his capital in Babylon circa 305 B.C. Seleukos was subsequently able to recover the Asian possessions of Alexander by winning military victories over some of the other former generals of Alexander the Great. The obverse of the rare coin offered here has the head of Herakles facing right, seen wearing a lion's skin head dress; and the reverse has a seated Zeus facing left, holding an eagle. The name of Seleukos is seen behind the seated Zeus, and before, is the forepart of a horse and an anchor symbol which are both mint marks of Seluekos I. This coin was minted in Ecbatana, which was the summer residence of the Persian kings, and is modern day Hamadan in western Iran. This coin was classified in "Coins of the Seleucid Empire from the Collection of Arthur Houghton", by Arthur Houghton, American Numismatic Society, New York, 1983, as being from the Ecbatana mint and minted within the same series as nos. 1128 & 1129, Pl. 67. The coin type seen here is a continuation of the "Herakles-Zeus" type coinage of Alexander the Great which had been inaugurated during his lifetime, and Seleukos I simply substituted his name from that of Alexander, and added his mint mark symbols. One added difference is that the head of Herakles seen on the obverse, may be a deified portrait of Alexander who died in Babylon circa 323 B.C., as the eye clearly is designed in an upturned manner, and this is a Greek Hellenistic convention of portraiture that is intended to show a deified god. In addition, the obverse shows a slight fleshy lump above the nose and lower forehead which Alexander was thought to have developed in the latter stages of his life. The choice of Seleukos continuing the Alexander "Herakles-Zeus" type of coinage, also tied Seleukos I closer to Alexander, and helped to legitimize his rule in Asia. This coin is a rare type, as classified in the "Celebrated Collection of Coins formed by the late Richard C. Lockett, Greek, Part IV, Glendining & Co., London, 1961, no. 2548, Pl. XV. This coin is very different than the bulk of the Alexander "Herakles-Zeus" type coinage, because rather than portraying Herakles on the obverse, this coin type portrays not only Herakles, but also Alexander the Great as a god. There are very few obverse dies that show Herakles with the upturned eye as well, and this was a development in ancient Greek Hellenistic coinage that is seen only after the death of Alexander in 323 B.C. Ex: Spink & Son, London, circa 1960's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1295397
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This beautiful Greek coin is a silver drachm attributed to the mint and city of Larissa, and dates circa 400-380 B.C. This piece is approximately 20mm in diameter, weighs 6.15 g., and is in EF-/EF condition. This piece also has extremely high relief and the obverse features the beautiful facing head of the nymph Larissa; and the reverse shows a grazing horse standing right on a ground line, with Greek lettering below meaning "Larissa". There is also the minute lettering "AI" seen below the belly of the horse, and this represents the signature of the die artist. According to C. Lorber in "The Silver Facing Head Coins of Larissa", Early Classification, Type 3: "The artist 'AI' became the mint's chief engraver, displacing he who signed himself 'SIMO', and the present dies are among the finest in the entire series." The coin offered here is one of the earliest dies of the series, and the early dies of the series had the two artist signatures noted above. In addition, the flank of the standing horse has a brand that appears to be the Greek letter "X". This "X" brand is also one of the few known examples, and appears only on this particular reverse die. It is unknown as to the meaning of this brand, and as this coin was signed by the artist, there certainly has to be a meaning behind this symbol. The early series with the facing heads of the mint Larissa predating circa 380 B.C., are the most desirable among collectors, and have a high degree of art. The attractive facing head seen here is leaning to the left, as the right shoulder is raised, and the female image has flowing hair that appears to be moving with the wind. The artist was able to convey a great deal of movement on the obverse, and in contrast, a complete sense of calm is conveyed on the reverse with the standing and grazing horse. This coin type, along with the artist's signature, is also considered by many numismatists to be a masterpiece, not only within the series, but also for the period. An exceptional coin of great beauty which is now scarce on the market. C. Lorber, Early Classification, no. 20.2. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1990's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1323656
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This attractive Greek silver triobol was minted in Phokis in central Greece during the Classical Period, circa 460-430 B.C. This coin weighs 3.0 gms, has a dark gray patina, and is in extremely fine condition (EF/EF). The obverse of this interesting coin has a facing bull, and the reverse features the bust of Artemis facing right, with her hair bound with a fillet. The face of this young goddess also has a pleasing smile that is also designed with an earlier "Archaic Period" artistic style. There are four letters seen around the bust of this young goddess, with each letter seen at each corner of the incuse square, and these letters represent the name of "Phokis". The facing bull seen on the obverse may also represent a sacrificial bull, and has very high relief. The coin offered here is a superb example for the type, as most of these examples are found in Very Fine grade (VF), and have a great deal of wear. References: Sear 2348. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1385577
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$5,800.00
This superb to mint quality coin is a Greek gold stater of Alexander the Great, circa 323-320 B.C., and grades EF+/FDC (Extremely Fine+/Mint State). This beautiful coin also weighs 8.6 gms, and is perfectly centered. This coin was minted in Miletos, and was struck under Philoxenos, who was a general of Alexander the Great. The obverse (Obv.) of this coin features the helmeted head of Athena facing right, and is wearing a Corinthian helmet with a coiled serpent. There are also flowing locks of hair seen on the cheek and neck, which is also a unique feature of this obverse die and coin type. The reverse (Rev.) has a finely detailed and exceptional standing Nike holding a victory wreath in her extended right hand, and a stylis in the left hand. The Nike seen here is also one of the best examples seen on a coin of this type, as one can see the minute facial details that are not normally seen. There is also a (Delta H) monogram in the left field. (Another example of this type and grade was offered by Larry Goldberg Coins & Collectibles, Auction 72, no. 4047. $2,500.00-$3,000.00 estimates, $5,000.00 realized.) References: Price 2078; SNG Ashmolean 2774. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1363783
Apolonia Ancient Art
$365.00
This superb Greek bronze coin is an (AE 17) that is from the city of Mesembria, and dates circa 4th-3rd century B.C. This coin is approximately 17mm in diameter, weighs 5.8 grams, and is in superb condition (EF+/EF+). This coin also has a beautiful dark green patina, perfect centering, excellent metal, and high relief. The obverse (Obv.) of this coin has an excellent image of a Greek "Attic type" helmet, which was the favorite helmet type of elite cavalry units forged by Alexander the Great. This coin also has perfect centering, and the full crest of the helmet is seen on the flan, which is not often completely seen relative to this coin type. The reverse (Rev.) features an Celtic war shield, and has Greek lettering above and below, which also names the city Mesembria. This lettering is also complete, as this coin has perfect centering, and is not often seen on this coin type. The city of Mesembria was a Greek colony in Thrace on the Black Sea coast, and traded in slaves, and agricultural products. This coin is an exceptional example, is one of the better recorded examples with perfect centering, and has details not often seen both on the obverse and reverse. References: SNG BM 276. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this coin is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1353952
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,465.00
This extremely rare coin is a Greek silver drachm from the Epirote Republic, and dates circa 234-168 B.C. This coin is in good extremely fine/extremely fine (EF+/EF) condition, weighs 5.0 grams, and is approximately 21mm in diameter. This coin has on the obverse: a detailed and laureate bust of Zeus facing left, a monogram at the lower front of the bust, and a Greek legend below and behind. The reverse has: a standing eagle on a thunderbolt facing left, with the legend ADEI before, and PUTAN behind, all within a laurel wreath that is seen framing the border. The legend seen on the obverse is extremely rare, and may refer to the magistrate that minted the coin and/or the name of the current ruler of the Epirote Republic. This coin may also be the only known recorded example with this obverse legend. The reverse legend refers to the Epirote Republic itself. The artistic style of the Zeus bust also has an extremely high degree of art, and is a better style that what is usually seen on the scarce coinage of this type. Another example of this coin type, without the obverse legend and the Zeus bust facing right, was sold by Numismatica Ars Classica in Zurich, Switzerland for 1,300 SF. The coin offered here is not only an extremely rare type, but is also a superb grade (good extremely fine). References: Franke, Epirus, 32ff (var.); SNG Cop 114. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1362107
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This attractive ancient Greek coin is a Sikyon silver obol that dates circa 360-330 B.C. This coin is approximately 13 mm in diameter, weighs .83 gms, and is in Extremely Fine/good Very Fine (EF/VF+) condition. This coin has a very light gray patina, perfect centering, excellent metal, and exceptional artistic style. The obverse (Obv.) features a beautiful wreathed bust of a young Apollo facing right, and the reverse (Rev.) shows a flying dove right with a monogram behind. The dove is also a civic symbol of Sikyon, and was also sacred to Apollo. The Apollo seen on the obverse, has exceptional artistic style, as it is a very realistic portrait of a young Apollo, has long flowing hair as earlier "Classical Period" portraits show, and has minute detail in the rendering of the wreath. This coin is also a better example than what is normally seen for this scarce issue. The condition is also better than most examples, and this piece is one of the better recorded examples of this type. References: Sear 2776. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this coin is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1321881
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This attractive ancient Greek coin is a Sikyon silver stater that dates circa 350-330 B.C. This coin is approximately 23 mm wide, weighs 11.8 gms, and is in good very fine/extremely fine condition (VF+/EF). This coin also has a light gray patina, perfect centering, and excellent metal, with some minute roughness seen mostly on the high relief sections of the obverse and reverse. This attractive coin features on the obverse the mythical creature Chimaera, facing left, with the letter "I" seen below the belly of the creature that is seen standing/walking on a ground line. The reverse features a dove flying left, with the letter "N" below the beak; all within a laurel wreath. The Chimaera was a celebrated monster who sprung from the union of Echidna and Typhon, and had three heads; those of a lion, a goat, and a dragon. The Greek hero Bellerophon with the support of Minerva, and the aid of the winged horse Pegasus, attacked and killed the Chimaera in an epic battle. The image of Chimaera, seen on the obverse of this coin, has a goat neck and head rising from it's back, and the head and body of a lion. The city of Sikyon chose this creature as a civic symbol, and is one of the few known images of this creature seen on ancient Greek coinage. This coin type is also highly desirable among collectors of ancient Greek coinage who collect coins that illustrate creatures known from ancient Greek myth. References: BMC 57. SNG Copenhagen 48. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, circa 1980's. I certify that this coin is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1259952
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This scarce coin is a silver tetradrachm that was minted in the name of Alexander the Great, circa 311-305 B.C. This coin is approximately 26 mm in diameter, weighs 17.1 grams, is perfectly centered, and is in about extremely fine/extremely fine condition: EF-/EF. This piece also has attractive old cabinet toning, and has an even light gray patina. The obverse has the head of Herakles facing right, wearing a lion's skin headdress, and the obverse is seen in extremely high relief. The obverse has superb artistic style, and the eye of Herakles is seen wide open and is slightly upturned. This is a Greek Hellenistic convention of art that also is meant to portray a deified god, and the portrait seen here may also represent Alexander the Great in the guise of Herakles. The reverse has a seated Zeus facing left, holding an eagle in his extended right arm, with the name of "Alexander" seen behind, and "King" below in Greek lettering. In addition, there is a monogram seen below the throne that is seen within a victory wreath, and the letters "MI" are seen before the throne with a symbol seen below. This symbol represents a type of scythe known as a "grape picker", and this weapon was used on a long pole in order to attack cavalry by slashing and pulling down the rider from his horse. This type of weapon was especially effective against heavy armored riders, who removed from their mounts, could then easily be dispatched by an infantryman. This symbol is extremely rare, with only one recorded example by Martin Price in "The Coinage in the Name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus", The British Museum, 1991. Price also classified this coin as being from the "MI" series, Babylon Mint, circa 311-305 B.C., nos. 3745-3775. The coin offered here is analogous to no. 3768, which is listed as having a "sickle" symbol. This symbol is extremely rare relative to ancient Greek numismatics, and the coin offered here, and the Price example may be the only two recorded examples. In addition, Nancy Waggoner in "The Alexander Mint at Babylon", Columbia University, 1968, thought that the "MI" series, denoted by the "MI" letters seen on the reverse, was a result in a change in the mint personnel at Babylon with the resumption of power there by Seleucus I, circa 311 B.C. Seleucus I gained power in Babylon by wrestling control of Babylon from Antigonos I Monophthalmos, and finally defeating him at the battle of Ipsos circa 301 B.C. The coin offered here may in fact be the first coin issue minted by Seleucus I, and it is interesting to note that the symbols seen on the "MI" series are military in nature, and some of these symbols include a "double-ax", a "ship's prow", and a "spearhead". The "MI" letters are also seen on several subsequent regal coin issues of Seleucus I after circa 305 B.C. The coin offered here is an Alexander the Great type that is seldom seen on the market with the symbols attributed to Seleucus I, and was an issue that helped to secure Seleucus I as "King of Asia". Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1261031
Apolonia Ancient Art
$765.00
This beautiful coin is a large Athenian silver tetradrachm that dates circa 136-80 B.C. The grade is superb to mint state, with some metal loss on the obverse, is approximately 15.5 grams, and is approximately 1.4 inches wide. The standing owl seen within the overall design on the reverse is approximately .75 inches high. Both sides are very well centered and the reverse is extremely detailed. This coin is very large and has a wide flan, is slightly larger than most examples, and resembles a medallion. This coin type is known as a "New Style" Athenian tetradrachm, which was minted in ancient Athens, and recalled the grandeur of the earlier golden age of Athens. Athens lost the Peloponnesian War to Sparta circa 404 B.C., was later defeated by Macedonia at Chaeronea circa 338 B.C., and her coinage was severely curtailed until circa 190 B.C., when she was finally able to start minting this coin series which is known as the "New Style" series. This coin type was also known to the ancient Greeks as "stephanephoroi", meaning "wreath bearers". This coin is nearly pure silver and was an international currency from the second century B.C. until the time of Augustus. These new Athenian coins, recalling an older more familiar design with the helmeted Athena's head on the obverse and the standing owl on the reverse, quickly became the dominant coin in the region. While their basic design remained unchanged with the goddess Athena and her owl, the obverse on this coin shows the goddess wearing a very stylized helmet, and the reverse shows a wreath encircling an extremely detailed owl balanced on an amphora. The letters on the reverse: A-OE, represent A-THENS, along with the civic symbol of Athens which is the standing owl. There is also a cornucopia symbol to the right of the amphora, and both of these symbols represented the commercial trading bounty of Athens. This coin would also make a great pendant, as it is large and has a great deal of eye appeal. In addition, this coin has a flat flan which is not concave, and this is also a positive feature for a pendant. Sear no. 2555. BMC 11., no. 503. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1990's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1226221
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This Thasos silver tetradrachm coin is mint state (FDC) to superb quality grade (EF+/EF+), and dates circa circa 2nd-1st century B.C. This superb graded piece is approximately 34 mm wide, and weighs 17.1 gms. This attractive piece is well centered and shows on the obverse (Obv.) a young bust of Dionysus, wreathed with grape leaves and bunches. The reverse (Rev.) shows a very muscular nude standing Herakles, holding a club in his right hand, and over his left arm, a cloak made from the skin of the Nemean lion. The impressive standing nude Herakles, is also more defined and muscular than what is normally seen, and this coin is a better example than most of the other examples that have been on the market. The (Rev.) also shows a legend in Greek lettering seen on each side of Herakles and below. The lettering to the right reads "HERAKLES"; and below reads "THASOS", which refers to the island of Thasos where this coin was likely minted. This coin type is also classified as a Celtic imitation of the Thasos types, and this is likely the case for this coin type, but it may be that the majority of these coins were minted by Thasos for trade with the Thracian interior. The pieces with better artistic style are generally recognized as being from the Thasos mint, as the piece offered here, and the piece offered here has great artistic style for the period. Thasos is a Greek island in the northern Aegean Sea off the coast of Thrace, and was colonized by the Phoenicians for its gold mines. The Phoenicians also established a religious cult on the island to their god Melkart, who later came to be identified with the Greek god Herakles when the island was Hellenized circa 650 B.C. The depiction of the Thracian wine god Dionysus was also adopted on the subsequent Thracian coinage as well. In 197 B.C., the Romans defeated Philip V of Macedon at the battle of Cynoscephalae, and thus made Thasos a "free" city state. Pliny the Elder was later to describe Thasos as still being a "free" city state in the 1st century A.D. This coin is better than most examples, regarding the artistic style and the impressive muscular Herakles seen on the reverse, and has traces of mint luster. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1989. References: Sear 1759. BMC 74. SNG Copenhagen 1046. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1325568
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This powerful ancient coin was minted in ancient Lydia, and is attributed to the king of Lydia, Kroisos, circa 561-546 B.C. This silver coin is known as a Siglos, which is a half-stater, and weighs 5.3 gms. This coin was also minted on the so-called "heavy standard", and this coin type is also found in electrum and gold. This coin is in about Extremely Fine condition (EF-/EF-), has good centering, is approximately 17mm wide, and has a nice light gray patina. This coin features a powerful imagae on the obverse, which is the forepart of a lion bearing his teeth with an open mouth, and is facing the forepart of a horned bull. The reverse features a two part incuse square punch. King Kroisos was also the first to abandon electrum coinage in favor of a bimetallic currency based on pure gold and silver. The coin offered here represents this shift in the minting of ancient Greek coinage, and likely was minted 50-75 years after the invention of coinage. A nice example for the type. References: SNG Tubingen 3656; SNG van Aulock 2876. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1323957
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This superb to extremely fine coin is a Greek silver drachm attributed to Philip III, and was minted shortly after the death of Alexander the Great, circa 323 B.C. This coin was minted circa 323-319 B.C., is in superb to extremely fine condition (EF+/EF), is approximately 17 mm in diameter, weighs 4.2 gms, has nice centering, and a light gray patina. The obverse shows Herakles wearing a lion's skin headdress facing right, all within a dotted border. The reverse shows a seated Zeus, holding a standing eagle to the front, with a Greek monogram seen at the front and the name (Philip) in Greek lettering seen behind, all within a dotted border. This coin was minted in the name of Philip III Arridaeus, half brother of Alexander the Great, who was slated to share power with Alexander IV, the infant son of the late king Alexander the Great. The real power still lay behind the generals - Perdikkas, Antigonos, Lysimachos, Seleukos, Ptolomy and others - who were all biding their time for power. The coin offered here was likely minted by Antigonos, who had control of the bulk of Alexander's Asian posessions shortly after his death. This coin is also attributed to the mint of "Magnesia ad Maeandrum", and "minted circa 323-319 B.C." by Martin Price, who also noted that this mint was also controlled by Antigonos at the time this coin was minted. A nice coin with historical merit, and a nice quality example. References: Sear no. 6750; Price no. P56a. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1378546
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This very rare Greek (EL) electrum stater is from Kyzikos, and dates circa 550-450 B.C. This coin is approximately 20mm wide, weighs 16.12 gms, and is in extremely fine condition (EF/EF). This coin has a light reddish/brown patina, and perfect centering. The (OBV.) features a bust of Athena wearing a crested "Attic type" helmet facing left, with a zig-zag and pellet pattern designed crest base, and a tunny fish below. The (Rev.) features a quadripartite incuse square. This coin probably was influenced by the helmeted Athena coinage of Athens, and perhaps signaled a trade alliance. An exceptional specimen not often seen on the market. References: Boston MFA 1446; Gulbenkian 609. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Roma Numismatics, Auction IX, 2015, no. 320. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1385018
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This appealing silver tetradrachm was minted in Amphipolis (Northern Greece) under Roman control, circa 154-150 B.C., is approximately 35mm wide, weighs 16.9 gms, and grades superb quality (EF+) to (FDC) mint state. This beautiful piece features on the obverse (Obv.) the young bust of Artemis facing right, with a bow case behind, all within a dotted border. The face is a very sweet looking young portrait with flowing hair, and has better artistic style that what is normally seen. The young dainty features portray an eternally young goddess, and this piece has a high degree of eye appeal. The entire obverse design also portrays a Macedonian hoplite shield, and the outer rim shows Macedonian royal stars seen within semi-circles. The reverse (Rev.) shows the club of Herakles, with Greek lettering above and below, meaning MAKEDONON and PROTES (First Region.). There is also an (A) monogram seen within the framing ivy wreath, and this may refer to Amphipolis. The coin offered here was minted over a relatively short period of time, and subsequently, no coinage was struck in the region for another half century. This piece has some mint luster, is in superb condition, and an exceptional artistic style which all make this beautiful coin scarce on the market. An exceptional Greek coin struck under Roman control. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1989. References: BMC 7; Copenhagen 1314. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1323161
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This exceptional piece is an early Greek Athenian silver tetradrachm that dates circa 500-490 B.C., and is classified in "Group L" by Seltman. This coin is approximately 25mm wide, weighs 16.61 gms, and is in mint state condition (FDC/FDC). This coin has a very light gray patina with some minute spotty dark black deposits, and has a beautiful natural "as found" patina. This exceptional coin has the helmeted head of Athena facing right seen on the obverse, and the reverse has a facing standing owl, with an olive sprig behind, and the Greek lettering (A-TH-E) before. The standing owl was also the "civic badge" of Athens, and was widely recognized in the ancient Greek world. This coin also has perfect centering, in addition to, extremely high relief which are factors that make this coin one of the top examples that have been seen on the market. This coin was also likely minted shortly before the battle of Marathon, circa 490 B.C., and was likely used to help expand the Athenian forces that opposed the invading Persian military juggernaut. The helmeted Athena is also a masterpiece of Greek Archaic art, with the slightly smiling face of Athena and the large almond-shaped eyes which are hallmarks of the Archaic Period. The bust of Athena also has a sculptural quality and design that is not often seen on prior or subsequent Athenian issues. This piece also displays a full crest and neckline that is not often seen as well, as this piece has perfect centering and was minted on a large and full flan. Overall, this coin is one of the finest specimens known for the type due to the reasons noted above, along with the fact that this piece has exceptional artistic style which also contributes to this coin's beauty and eye appeal. References: Svoronos, Pl. 6, No. 11. and Seltman, Pl. XV, A214/P275. Ex: Private German collection circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1288982
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This rare coin is a Greek bronze (22mm) that was minted in the ancient Greek city of Amphaxitis, and dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 196-168 B.C. This piece is graded VF+/EF-, weighs 7.5 gms, and is one of the few best quality examples that have been recorded. This piece shows on the Obverse: The bearded bust of Herakles facing right, with his club seen behind his head, within a dotted border; and the Reverse: The club of Herakles, with the name of the city in Greek lettering seen above and below, all within an olive wreath. This piece also has a nice thick and even dark green/blue patina, and is a superb example for this rare issue. Amphaxitis was a Greek trading city which was approximately 50 kilometers north of the modern city of Thessaloniki. This city facilitated trade between the Greeks on the coast of Macedonia, and the Thraco-Macedonian tribes on the interior. The city was subsequently settled by veterans of the army of Alexander the Great. Sear 1376. BMC 5.1,2. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1278382
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This beautiful piece is a Greek Attic silver tetradrachm that dates circa 440-406 B.C., and is approximately 25mm wide. This piece weighs 17.2 gms, and is in Mint State to Superb grade, with some traces of original mint luster. This piece has a bust of a helmeted Athena facing right on the obverse, and the reverse features a standing facing owl, with an olive sprig and half moon to the left. In addition, the reverse features the Greek lettering "AOE", seen to the right of the standing owl, meaning "Athens". This piece also has exceptional centering, with a full necklace seen below the neckline of the Athena bust, and a full incuse square on the reverse showing a full olive sprig. This coin type seldom has the full necklace, along with the back crest seen on the helmet, as this beautiful specimen shows. These features are usually not seen, and are often off the flan, but one can clearly see the features noted above, as this coin has a wide flan with a perfectly centered strike. This coin also has extremely high relief, and there are minute details seen in the Athena bust, such as the individual beads in the necklace, and the singular hair lines. This piece also was over struck from another coin type, and some details can be seen on the flat section of the flan in front of Athena's face, and behind Athena's eye. This coin may have been re-struck from another coin that was military tribute from one of the Athenian client city-states. This coin was also minted during the period when Athens was expanding her empire, and could have been used to help finance the building of the Parthenon. Another analogous coin of this type and grade is seen in the Gemini Numismatic Auction XII, Jan. 11th, 2015, New York, no. 122. (Close to Mint state Grade, $3,750.00 estimate.) Svoronos pl. 13, no.2. Flament pl. 8, no. 4. The coin offered here is better than most examples, as it has high relief, exceptional centering with added features, some original mint luster, and nice eye appeal. Ex: Harlan Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: