Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
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All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #853880
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This rare vessel is from the Moche culture, that dwelled in modern day northern Peru, dates circa 500-700 A.D. and is from the Moche IV phase of ceramic development. This piece is intact with no repair/restoration, is in mint quality condition, and is approximately 8.25 inches high. This red-brown and cream colored ceramic is a rare piece, as it is a type of vessel known as a "sacrificial rite vessel". This piece has six figures on the vessel including a Moche standing owl deity seen at the center, a sea lion, a cormorant, a hooded male figure, an ocean skate(?), and a crab. All of the five figures that run around the main body of this stirrup-type vessel are all seen emerging from the background, and may represent their emerging into or from the spirit world. These figures are seen in high relief from the main body of the vessel, as they were individually mold made, and this production process took a great deal of skill and time relative to intregrating these images into the production of this ceramic. The standing owl deity seen at the center, which may also represent a priest in costume, is also the Moche deity that is seen in the "Presentation Theme", which is a Moche ceremony of sacrifice as defined by Christopher Donnan. (See "Moche Art of Peru" by Christopher Donnan, University of California, Los Angeles, CA., 1978, pp.158-174.) This Moche owl deity, seen in the "Presentation Theme" as defined by Donnan which is also identified as "Figure B", is a priest seen in an owl-hooded costume holding a goblet with blood from the sacrifice. There are also other known Moche ceramic vessels that portray this figure, as seen in the work noted above (Nos. 248 and 271.). The owl was sacred to the Moche because of it's night vision and sharp hunting skills at night, and because of their nocturnal nature, they were associated with death and were thought to travel between the living and spirit world. There are examples of Moche ceramics with a captive tied to the back of the owl, and this may represent the owl carrying the captive to the other world. The standing owl, seen in combination with the five figures that run around the main body of this vessel, are all related to Moche ceremony and sacrifice. The active red-brown sea lion depicted on this piece shows several round objects, seen at the front of the eye and on the stomach area, and are round stones that the sea lions frequently cough up when they are hunted. These stones were considered sacred by the Moche and were thought to have extremely powerful medicinal properties. The lively artistic style of the sea lion is exceptional, and has a great deal of expression. The hooded male figure, seen at the front of the vessel, may represent a sacrificial victim. It is interesting to note that one of the owl's feet appear to grip and morph into the hood that is seen on the male figure that is placed just below the body of the owl. The crab is also interesting in that the crab has anthropomorphized human-like eyes. The owl is also thought to represent the "magical flight" ecstatic trance state that was performed by Moche shamans and priests. The owl seen on this vessel also has a human designed eye, and may represent a shaman and/or priest in costume, or is in a state of transformation. (This ecstatic trance state was first described in 1638 by Antonio de la Calancha, in the historical Spanish document "Cornica Moralizada del Orden de San Augustin en el Peru, Con Sucesos Egemplares an esta Monarquia", Barcelona, Spain.) The ceramic offered here may represent the owl as presiding over the Moche sacrifices that are offered to the other world, due to the many attributes of the Moche owl deity as noted above, and as such is known as a "sacrificial rite vessel". (One of the few examples of this type of vessel was offered by Arte Primitivo, New York, June 2005, no. 329, $12,000.00-$15,000.00 estimates. The vessel offered by Arte Primitivo is also red-brown and cream colored, 10.5 inches high, and is Moche IV phase. See attached photo.) Ex: S. Benger collection, Germany, circa 1970's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1177714
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This extremely rare piece is a Moche blackware ceramic that dates circa 100 B.C.-200 A.D., Moche 1-II periods. This piece is approximately 6.75 inches high by 5.6 inches wide. This Moche ceramic is an early blackware example, and has a solid black/brown glaze over a light brown terracotta. This piece is in the form of a manta ray, and is seen in an upright position with its wings and tail section acting as support legs. This upright design allows the viewer to see a raised head that has anthropomorphic features, such as an open round eye at each side of the head, an open mouth seen where the gills of the manta ray would have been seen, and nostrils above the mouth. The gills of the manta ray are also seen below the mouth area and between the extended wings that form a base for the piece. In addition, the gills of the manta ray seem to emphasize the anthropomorphic head just seen above, and this anthropomorphic head is likely depicted morphing into a full human head, or vice-versa, from a human into a manta ray. The anthrpomorphic head seen on this piece is also enlarged, and according to Christopher Donnan in "Moche art of Peru", University of California, Los Angeles, CA., 1978, p.30: "Depiction of humans or anthropomorphized creatures involves a standard enlargement of the hands and heads. Sexual organs may also be enlarged for emphasis, although normally they are small relative to the size of the body, or are simply not indicated." The x-rare piece offered here has attractive and extensive root marking, has some minute spotty black mineral deposits, and is intact with no repair/restoration. Another extremely rare Moche manta ray ceramic type of nearly the same size of the piece offered here is seen in the Larco Museum Collection, Lima, Peru. (See attached photo. The Larco example is not a blackware piece, and has extended wings with a human face seen underneath.) The piece offered here is seldom seen in many old collections, and this is an excellent indicator that this piece is an extremely rare type. Ex: Galerie Arte Andino, Munich, Germany, circa 1980-1986. Ex: Dr. Klaus Maria collection, circa 1986-2012. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL test from Gutachten Lab., no. 638646, dated Dec. 5th, 1986, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1358352
Apolonia Ancient Art
$8,675.00
This exceptional Mayan plate has a great deal of eye appeal, and dates circa 600-700 A.D. This large example is approximately 12.75 inches in diameter, by 3.25 inches high, and is intact with no repair/restoration. This attractive piece has a polychrome glaze on the upper inner surfaces that is seen with very vibrant orange, black, white, and light red colors. This piece also has some attractive minute root marking and some spotty black mineral deposits. The bottom side of the plate is a light tan terracotta with three rounded legs with rattles within, and the "shoulder line" seen on the underside is very sharp and well defined. The top inner surface displays a stylized bust facing left of "God K", otherwise known as "K'awil", who is seen with an elongated nose, ear-flares, an elaborate smoking-mirror headdress, and a line-designed mouth. "God K" was one of the Mayan gods of greatest importance, and was associated with the natural elements linked to agricultural activities such as rain and thunder. The stylized bust is surrounded by four smoking scrolls that also refer to the four "cardinal directional points" that were sacred to the Maya. The entire bust design is also rendered with a stylized "circle-and-dot pattern" which also has filled colors within the circles, and this design type is of an artistic style that is associated with the Peten region. (For the design type, see a bowl published in: "Maya, Treasures of an Ancient Civilization", Abrams Pub., 1985, no. 122. See attached photo.) This piece also has a large black glyph band that frames the inner bust of "God K", and this contains glyphs that are associated with the "PSS" (Primary Standard Sequence) that was identified by Michael Coe. This glyph band was also painted by a very accomplished painter. Overall, this piece is an exceptional example of Mayan art that is also in superb to mint condition. Ex: Ferdinand Anton collection, Germany, circa 1959. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1286571
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This scarce to rare piece is a Mayan terracotta model of a throne, which dates circa 600-900 A.D. This piece is approximately 3.4 inches high, by 6.4 inches long, by 3.2 inches wide. This piece is made from four molded pieces, and the details and images seen on this piece were mold pressed into the terracotta. The front side of this piece shows a facing god figure, who also appears to be supporting the weight of the upper panel. The upper panel also shows two square "mat designs" which each show twelve boxes with a "spiral" symbol within. This "spiral" symbol is likely depicted as meaning "CH'ICH", meaning "blood", and/or "blood offering". This symbol also makes perfect sense for this piece, as this piece may also portray an offering altar, as well as portraying a throne that may have supported a seated figurine. The two holes seen at the top may be for pins to help support a seated figurine, but they may also represent holes that were used to drain the blood from the two panels, and this blood would then drip down below the altar and to the underworld gods below. According to the Mayan belief of blood offerings, each drop of blood would nourish the gods and the earth, ensuring a new abundant maize harvest that would feed the people and provide wealth for the court. If this was the case regarding this piece, then this piece likely is a votive representation of an offering altar where bloody offerings were placed for the gods, and this type of altar may also have doubled as a sacred throne for a Mayan royal personage. The emerging facing god seen at the front of this piece, may be a frontal version of the "War Serpent God", otherwise known as the "Jaguar-Serpent-Bird God". This composite image is primarily associated with warfare, and was a popular image with the Maya at Piedras Negras and Chichen Itza. The image seen on this piece also has feathers above each extened arm, jaguar-paw hands, a double necklace, large round ear-flares, and a nose guard attachment. (For the type of god seen here, see "The Gods and Symbols of Ancient Mexico and the Maya" by Mary Miller and Karl Taube, Thames and Hudson1993, pp. 104-105.) This complete piece is 100% original, and was repaired from four large fragments. There are also minute black spotty mineral deposits seen in various sections of the piece. This type of votive piece is seldom seen on the market, and also displays a Mayan god that is seldom seen. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Howard Rose collection, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1385336
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
This scarce piece is a Colima water carrier figurine that dates to the Proto-classic Period, circa 100 B.C.-250 A.D., and is approximately 13.25 inches high. This piece is intact with no repair and/or restoration, and has a nice even deep red glaze over the entire outer surface, save the bottoms of the flat feet. This piece also stands solidly by itself, and the water carrier seen here has a large jar on his back that has detailed ropes and fittings which are not normally seen on scarce pieces of this type. This water carrier also has his hands behind his head in order to steady his heavy load, and he also has a serene expression which runs counter to one that has a heavy load on his back. This piece also has some spotty black mineral deposits, and the surfaces show little wear. An exceptional example seldom seen on the market. Ex: Sotheby's pre-Columbian Art, New York, Nov. 2006, no. 387. ($5,000.00-$7,000.00 estimates, $9,000.00 realized.) Ex: Private Kansas collection, circa 2000's. Published: Featured in the ATADA Online Show, Aug. 9-19 2018 (www.atada.org/online-show). I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1369176
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This intact and interesting piece is a Chancay mother and child textile doll that dates circa 1300-1532 A.D. This appealing piece is approximately 12 inches high, and is made from several types of Chancay textiles made from alpaca wool and cotton. The Chancay culture was centered on the central coast of Peru, and produced some of the finest textiles relative to all of the Andean pre-Columbian cultures. Their blending of textiles with feathers is also readily evident with this piece, as there are colorful dark orange feathers that are woven into the dress of the standing woman. The face of this standing woman is also very likely, and conveys a realistic expression with it's woven nose, eyes, and mouth. This mint quality piece also has several types of textiles that are wrapped and formed around a reed superstructure, and there are extremely detailed woven red feet and hands that resemble a "stick figurine", with extended fingers and toes. There are also individual strands of textiles that represent long hair seen on both the mother and child. The child is seen being carried at the right-hand chest of the woman, and likely represents a woman and her child in the afterlife. The woman's outer dress garment is also very detailed, and has additional textile decorative elements in addition to the attached feathers. The outer garments of this figurine were also custom made, and are not simple wraps of textile scraps, as is usually seen on textile figures of this type. These textile dolls and/or puppets were votive, and promoted family and fertility in the afterlife. One of the best recorded examples, and compete figurines of this type with custom garments are scarce in the market, and are rarely seen in this intact mint condition. (For the type see: "Pre-Columbian Art of South America" by Alan Lapiner, Abrams Pub., New York, 1976, nos. 678 and 679. See attached photo.) A custom Plexiglas case is included that protects this piece from environmental elements and insects such as moths. Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1367763
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This superb piece is a Veracruz/Mayan tripod plate vessel that dates to the Early Postclassic Period, circa 900-1200 A.D., and is approximately 12.4 inches in diameter, by 5 inches high. This piece is made from a dark red clay, and has a dark orange glaze that covers the entire piece. There are also three incised decorative boxes that are evenly spaced on the outer bowl, and these boxes have a dark gray/black glaze with cream colored incised lines. These boxes contain geometric patterns that may represent solar symbols, and these decorative elements are identical, save for the addition of a single circle added in Box B, seen with four circles, with yet another additional circle added in Box C, seen with five circles. Together, the three boxes likely represent a single complex concept, such as the movement of the planets, or perhaps representing a symbolic reference to the "Palenque Triad". There is also a symbol seen on the bottom central section of the bowl, and this may be a solar symbol and/or a sky symbol as well. This piece also has three rounded legs that are designed as a rattle, and all three legs are functional. There is also a slightly flared flat rim, with evenly spaced decorative black bands that are seen on the top flat rim surface. This piece is intact with no apparent repair/restoration, and is in superb condition with a very vibrant glaze. In addition, there are some spotty black mineral deposits. (Another analogous piece of this type and size was offered in Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, May 1990, no. 236. $1,500.00-$2,000.00 estimates. See attached photo.) This piece is also relatively scarce on the market not only for the type, but also for the intact condition. Ex: Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1970's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1276371
Apolonia Ancient Art
$9,675.00
This extra large Mayan tripod plate dates circa 600-900 A.D., and is approximately 15.75 inches in diameter by 4 inches high. This piece has been attributed to the Peten region of the Yucatan Peninsula, and is an exceptional example for the type. This appealing piece has very vibrant dark orange/red, white, black, and light blue/gray colors. This piece has three legs, along with an esoteric upward sloping bowl which has the multi-colored polychrome glaze on the top inner side of the vessel, and a light brown terracotta on the underside of the vessel. This piece has a "serpent band" that is seen running around the inner edge of the plate, and this has two symbols that alternate and appear to interlock within the design. These symbols may be celestial in nature, and frame the Mayan cartouche glyph that is seen in the field in the center of the plate. This Mayan cartouche glyph also has an inner central glyph, which resembles a face with an open mouth. This glyph is the Mayan glyph "Ajaw", meaning "lord". According to Dr. Mark Van Stone, Professor of Art History, Southwestern College, and noted Maya expert specializing in Mayan hieroglyphs and calligraphy, who also co-authored the book "Reading the Maya Glyphs", commented the following regarding this piece: "Now, that date in the center is pretty unusal. It recalls the Ajaw Alters we find at Caracol and some other sites: a round alter with a text encircling a huge Ajaw date, which marks the "name" (the last day) of a "Period Ending" (usually a K'atun-end). It is a normal "Ajaw" day sign in its normal cartouche, surmounted by a numeral 13, to read "13 Ajaw", a date of important augury, as 13 was the number with the most power, and a period-ending on "13 Ajaw" was really significant. (It was the date chosen by Carl Johan Calleman for his calculation of the "End of the World"-11th Oct. 2011, in contrast to the more popular "4 Ajaw PE"-21st Dec. 2012.) In any event, it's perfectly legible, and the kind of thing that would be learned first by a student scribe." This scarce to rare piece has a cartouche date glyph that is a marker to an important event, and/or refers to an event in the Mayan calendar, and the cartouche date glyph seen on this piece is a significant example, as noted above by Dr. Mark Van Stone. The number "13", associated with the cartouche date glyph, is easily seen and represented by two bars and three dots that are attached to the top of the cartouche date glyph. This piece has some minor repair/crack fill from three large fragments, and is 99-100% original. There is also some attractive root marking seen in various sections of the piece, along with some minute black spotty mineral deposits. This piece is a large and rare Mayan plate with extremely rare symbols and is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. A TL authenticity test is available from Gutachten Lab, Germany, no. 18611, dated Jan. 7th, 1986. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Pre AD 1000 item #1161759
Apolonia Ancient Art
Apolonia Ancient Art is a full member of the ATADA (Antique Tribal Art Dealers Association). Apolonia Ancient Art follows the "Trade Practices and Standards", as defined by the ATADA regarding all business transactions. The ATADA is an association of dealers in antique Tribal and PreColumbian art whose aim is to promote responsible dealing, and provide a standard for all of it's members to represent authentic objects that have full and legal title. The ATADA members "Trade Practices and Standards" can be found at: https://www.atada.org/bylaws.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1254565
Apolonia Ancient Art
$765.00
This interesting piece is a Recuay culture standing warrior that dates to the Early Intermediate Period, circa 400 B.C.-300 A.D., and the Recuay culture was centered in the Northern Peruvian Highlands, Callejon de Huaylas Valley. This piece is approximately 5.8 inches high by 4.2 inches in diameter, and is in intact condition, save for some minor stress cracks that appear to be filled at the base. This piece was made with a "resist-decoration" technique, and is a thin-walled white/cream colored kaolin clay with red-orange, yellow, and black colored line-drawn highlights. This piece also has some attractive light brown burnishing, and some spotty black mineral deposits. This piece shows a very animated figure that appears to be a standing warrior, as he is seen wearing a helmet and probable body armor, which is built into the round and portly design of the main body of the vessel. This figure also appears to be holding some objects in each hand, and the object in his right hand may be a round fruit which he is seen lifting to his wide mouth. The artistic style of this piece is also very geometric in it's design, and the lower legs and feet of this warrior are also designed in high relief at the base of the vessel. This piece also has the typical single spout which is wide and funnel shaped, and is integrated in width and height relative to the head of the warrior, which makes it to be somewhat imperceptible at first glance. It is also likely that the Recuay were a satellite people of the Mochica, and perhaps were guardians of sacrificial llamas and were an elite group of warriors. The ceramic offered here may also have been designed with additional ceramics, which made up a group scene that was created as a ceremonial grave offering. (For the culture and the warrior-type ceramics, see A. Lapiner, "Pre-Columbian Art of South America", New York, 1976, pp. 167-169.) A scarce piece with nice eye appeal. Ex: Dr. Ernst J. Fischer collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1215119
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This piece is a Mayan terracotta that dates from the Late Classic period, circa 600-900 A.D., and is approximately 6 inches high by 7.5 inches wide by 4.5 inches deep. This piece has powerful eye appeal, as it shows the Mexican rain god Tlaloc with large round eyes, scrolled upper lip, and exposed tooth row. This complete piece is a very large applique that was part of a extremely large vessel which may have had several of these applied appliques that ran around the outside of the vessel. There is original white pigment seen over the exposed teeth and round eyes, root marking seen in sections of the piece, and there are light brown and gray earthen deposits seen over the entire piece. The condition of this piece is intact, with little apparent crack fill, and this piece appears to have broken cleanly away from the main body of the vessel. A wall section of this large vessel also forms the backside of the piece offered here. The mix of Mexican and Mayan motifs in the Late Classic period is not uncommon, and another example of a Mayan terracotta with the Mexican rain god Tlaloc can be seen in "Pre-Columbian Art: The Morton D. May and The Saint Louis Art Museum Collections" by Lee Parsons, New York, 1980, no. 318, p. 205. The Mexican rain god Tlaloc has also appeared since the Early Classic period in the Maya zone, and is often related to scenes of "autosacrifice" involving the nobility, in which they self extract and offer their own blood. This "blood letting ceremony", as an offering to the gods, is also a metaphor for rain, although the Maya had their own rain deity, Chaac. The piece offered here may also have been part of a large ceremonial blood letting vessel. In relation to the letting of blood, the Tlaloc deity also appears on war shields, as seen on Mayan terracotta figures. This piece is scarce to rare, and sits on a custom black metal stand. Ex: E. Duncan collection, Stilwell, Kansas, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1325875
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This complete piece is made of 22 tubular jade beads, along with a jade "Celt-God" pendant, which is also known as an "Ax-God" pendant. The beads strung together are approximately 22 inches long, and the "Celt-God" pendant is approximately 4 inches high by 1 inches wide near the base. This piece dates circa 200-500 A.D., and it was produced in northern Costa Rica, in an area known as the Atlantic Watershed region. The beads and pendant were "bow-drilled", with a hole created from drilling at each end. The beads are also a combination of different types of jade and jade-type stones, with some darker in color than others. The pendant shows "line-cut" design and is likely an anthropomorphic human image. One can see design "line-cut" work that looks like an open mouth and head at the top of the pendant. The back side is flat, and the "line-cut" design is seen on the concave front side. There is also minute mineral deposits and root marking seen on the pendant and most of the beads, and most, if not all of the beads appear to be ancient, and have mineral deposits and patina. These pendants had magical properties, and were worn as personal adornments which also conveyed that status and rank of the owner. The "Celt-God" pendant type was first developed by the Olmec circa 1200-1000 B.C., and this type of object was also votive. This type of object is also found in many pre-Columbian cultures in Mexico and Guatemala. This type of jade object is also explained in detail by Frederick Lange in "Pre-Columbian Jade", University of Utah Press, 1993, p. 278, Fig. 21.9 (b), and this type of celt is classified by Lange as being a "crouching figure" type (See attached photo). This piece can also be worn as is, and can also be displayed in the included custom display box. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre 1492 item #1367435
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865.00
This lovely Aztec/Mixtec tripod dates to the Late Postclassic Period, circa 1000-1450 A.D., and is approximately 4.2 inches high, with a diameter at the rim of 5.5 inches. This piece is intact, with no noticeable repair/restoration, and has a light polychrome slip in black, cream, and light red colors. This piece is a tripod bowl with flat plank extended legs that also extend past the outer diameter of the bowl, and because this design, this piece is very stable sitting on a flat surface. This piece also has an attractive black and red "line-designed" geometric pattern that runs around the outer edge of the bowl, and are likely spiritual in nature. In addition, there are raised "line-designed" symbols seen on the inner surface of the bowl, and these symbols are likely sacred as well. These symbols are also completely intact, and this is rare for vessels such as this, as the raised lines are often broken and have missing sections. This piece was also produced by the Mixteca people for the Aztec nobility who preferred these vessels for their food service vessels. It's also unknown whether these vessels were used to grind or abrade a foodstuff or other organic substance, or weather they served a solely ritual, service function. An interesting intact vessel that is becoming scarce in today's market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1960's. Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1338969
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This rare piece is a Chontal culture stone anthropomorphic pendant that dates circa 600-200 B.C., and is approximately 5.5 inches high, by 4 inches deep, by 2.3 inches wide. This interesting piece shows a face emerging from a half moon object that resembles a "crescent half-moon", but this object more likely represents a fruit or a vegetable type, such as a head of maize or a squash. The top of the piece has a segmented extension with a curled end, and this resembles the terminal end of a vegetable type plant where it was connected to the root. The base of the piece also has a curled end which may represent the other terminal end of the vegetable type plant. The well-defined face is seen emerging from the center of the vegetable type plant, and both sides of the face appear to have folded back plant material that frames the face. This facial framed border is comprised of individual "string line-cuts" that are seen in stark contrast to the smooth polished surfaces of the emerging face. The face also has a well defined mouth, nose, and bow drilled eyes. There are two additional bow-drilled holes seen on the top back side, and this allowed this piece to suspend as a pendant, and perhaps this piece was the central element in a sacred necklace. The ancient Chontal created sacred stone pieces such as this piece that were believed to posses magical and fertility powers. This piece is made from a beautiful greenish-brown stone with orange flecks, and in addition, is a scarce to rare stone type which is normally associated with "Chontal" type pieces, rather than "Mexcala" type pieces. For another piece with this scarce to rare stone type see: "In the Heart of Pre-Columbian America, The Gerard Geiger Collection", Milan, 2003, no. 102. (This piece is a mask with notched sides as the piece offered here. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is also analogous to another Chontal mask that has a face designed in profile that is very analogous to the piece offered here. (This piece is also seen in the reference noted above, no. 99. See attached photo.) The piece offered her is much rarer than the more common Chontal masks, as it was designed as a pendant, and the anthropomorphic design with the emerging face is seldom seen. This type of piece may also represent a "transformation" type piece, which also conveys a completely different spiritual meaning than the majority of Chontal masks. This piece also sits on a custom metal stand. Ex: Merrin Gallery, Inv. #680, New York, NY, circa 1980's. Ex: Ebnother collection, Schaffhausen, Germany, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is provided to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1367689
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This attractive piece is a Paracas bowl that dates to the Chavinoid Period Paracas, circa 1000-600 B.C., and is approximately 6.8 inches in diameter, by 3.25 inches high. This piece is among the earliest ceramics that were produced by any Andean pre-Columbian culture, and it has very detailed incised geometric "line-designed" motifs. This light to dark brown glazed piece has added dark red highlights, and this dark red color is seen within an incised band that runs around the piece. This band has two incised geometric feline masks seen nearly on opposite sides of the bowl, and between, there are defined boxes that have an incised "hand-design" symbol within each box. The geometric feline masks are seen in a two-dimensional manner, with raised noses from the surface of the bowl, and incised fangs extending above and below a horizontal mouth. The overall design illustrates a very powerful sacred image that also appears to protect the contents of the bowl. Bowls of this type may also have been produced for ritual purposes and/or offerings. This piece is intact, save for a small pie-shaped shard that was repaired back into the main body of the piece. This piece also has some attractive root marking, and the glaze has a very fine even high gloss finish. There is also some dark brown burnishing seen on the bottom surface of the bowl that also adds to the eye appeal of this piece. (Another analogous piece was offered in Sotheby's "Pre-Columbian Art", New York, June 1999, no. 212. $1,200-$1,500.00 estimates, $1,840.00 realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1394012
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This intact and x-large piece is a Colima standing shaman/priest that dates to the Protoclassic Period, circa 100 B.C.-250 A.D., and is approximately 17.8 inches high. This powerful piece has a dark red glaze that covers the entire piece, and has some spotty dark black and brown mineral deposits, along with some attractive root marking. This figure is seen holding a rattle in his left hand, and a curved implement in his right which may be a ceremonial knife. He is also seen wearing a shell pectoral, short trunks, and a domed helmet/headdress that also has a spout emerging from the top of the head. His upper torso is also completely nude, save for the shell pectoral that is seen in the center of his chest. This powerful looking figure is also seen with a drug induced trance-like expression, and has narrow "coffee bean" type eyes that enhance his look. This figure appears to be conducting a religious drug induced ceremony, and this figure is likely a shaman/priest. This piece also stands very solidly, and is somewhat heavy, as it is a thick walled ceramic. A scarce piece for the culture, as it is also in intact condition. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, May 1989, no. 105. ($1,500-$2,000.00 estimates, $2,860.00 realized.) Ex: Private Kansas collection, circa 1990's-2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1369191
Apolonia Ancient Art
$725.00
This intact and interesting piece is a Chancay child and crib textile doll that dates circa 1300-1532 A.D. This appealing piece is approximately 10.25 inches long, by 4.25 inches high, and is made from several types of Chancay textiles made from alpaca wool and cotton. The Chancay culture was centered on the central coast of Peru, and produced some of the finest textiles relative to all of the Andean pre-Columbian cultures. This piece is a young child seen lying within an elongated crib that is tightly wrapped with a white colored textile. The child is also tightly attached to the crib, and is seen wearing a multi-colored garment. The young child has long dark brown hair tied at the back of the head into a loose bun, and cascades over the side of the crib. The nose, eyes, and mouth are made from woven textiles, and appears to be very serene little girl. The short red woven hands are tightly woven, and resemble a "stick figure" with extended fingers and toes. The piece is also made with numerous textiles that are wrapped and formed around a reed superstructure, and these Chancay textile dolls and/or puppets were votive, as they promoted family and fertility in the afterlife. This piece also has outer garments that were custom made for this child figure, and are not simple wraps of textile scraps, as is usually seen on textile figures of this type. One of the best recorded examples of this type, as it is mint quality, and complete figurines of this type with custom garments are scarce in the market. (For the type see: "Pre-Columbian Art of South America" by Alan Lapiner, Abrams Pub., New York, 1976, nos. 678 and 679. See attached photo.) A custom Plexiglas case is included that protects this piece from environmental elements and insects such as moths. Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1281362
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This superb to mint quality vessel is a Moche stirrup vessel that dates circa 300-400 A.D., Moche III Period. This piece is approximately 7.5 inches high, and is in intact condition with vibrant dark red and cream colors. This striking vessel has some minute black spotty mineral deposits and root marking, and has a nice even glaze. This piece is a lustrous deep dark red stirrup vessel, with a cream colored body, and the decorative elements seen on the main body of this vessel are also rendered in a dark lustrous red color. These decorative elements are comprised of two anthropomorphic figures seen moving to the right, with snake-headed tails and trailing snake-headed headdress/ears; and three snakes, with one seen between the stirrup handle, and two others which act as a dividing panel for each of the moving figures. These moving figures are also seen with a serpent-like and/or Iguana-like head, and a single human leg and arm which are extended away from the body, and this Moche convention of art is meant to convey that these figures are in motion. In addition, these figures are seen holding a sacrificial tumi knife in each hand, which may be an indication that this vessel portrays a sacrificial scene, as these moving figures may also be portraying Moche priests in costume who are engaged in a ceremonial sacrificial scene as "spirit gods". These moving figures also appear to be confronting the two facing snakes, and these facing snakes may also be seen as "spiritual sacrificial victims". According to Christopher Donnan in "Moche Fineline Painting: Its Evolution and Its Artists", UCLA Fowler Museum, Los Angeles, Ca., 1999, p. 196-197, Donnan comments further on Moche ceramics of this type: "The paintings of several other artists are stylistically similar to those of the Madrid Painter and the Larco Painter. All are on similar stirrup spout bottles with red spouts and white chambers. Both the red and white slips on these bottles were well prepared. They are covered evenly and completely, with none of the underlying color bleeding through. They painted fineline designs in red slip and added details either by overpainting or the cut-slip technique. Careful burnishing produced a handsome surface luster. These features are very distinctive amoung Phase III painted vessels. Perhaps they were produced in a single workshop." (See attached photo from the above reference, Fig. 6.19, that shows an analogous spiritual figure as seen on the vessel offered here. This piece also shows this figure holding a sacrificial head by the hair. This piece was also classified as being stylistically similar to the Madrid Painter.) The piece offered here is very close stylistically to the Madrid Painter, and may be by this painter and/or an individual who worked in his workshop. Moche vessels of this type are now scarce on the market, as they were only produced during the Phase III Period, and are of an extremely high artistic style. Overall, this piece is a superb intact example with vibrant colors, and is also likely by the Madrid Painter and/or his workshop. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Dr. Klaus Maria collection, Germany, circa 1980-2012. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL authenticity test document from Gutachten Lab, Germany, no. 219005, dated 05-15-1990, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: