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Votive Roman Bronze Figurine of Hermes/Mercury

Votive Roman Bronze Figurine of Hermes/Mercury


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Directory: Antiques: Regional Art: Ancient World: Roman: Pre AD 1000: Item # 1353007
Apolonia Ancient Art
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290 Fillmore St. #D
Denver, CO. 80206
303-321-7351 gallery

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 $875.00 
$875.00

This attractive piece is a Roman bronze figurine of the god Mercury, and dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D. This piece is approximately 2.25 inches high, and is a complete example with no repair/restoration. This piece has an attractive light to dark green patina, along with some minute spotty red mineralized highlights. There is also some spotty light brown mineral deposits, and overall, this piece is in it's superb natural "as found" condition. This piece was cast as one piece from a mold, and was likely produced as a votive object for a temple, or for a private Roman shrine in a home known as a "lararium". Mercury is also the Roman name for the Greek god Hermes, and both gods had the same attributes, and are seen wearing a winged helmet or cap known as a "petasus". In addition, the figurine offered here is seen holding a money bag in his right hand, and a "caduceus" over his right shoulder along with a draped cloak. The "caduceus" also served as a herald's staff which possessed magical powers, and has two entwined snakes at the top. Hermes and Mercury both were the Greek and Roman gods of commerce, travel, and were the messengers of the gods. This nude figurine is also seen wearing a necklace, and stands by itself on it's own double tiered base. This piece was meant to be seen in it's upright position, as the base is very wide at the bottom. This piece for a small object has a great deal of eye appeal, and can be seen at a distance because of it's simplistic design. The face has a "mask-like" design, and imbues this piece with a magical haunting appearance. It's very likely that a religious pilgrim would have purchased this object as a votive donation to either a religious temple, or as an addition to a private shrine. This piece also sits on a custom raised display stand, and simply lifts off the stand. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: