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Rare Late Spedos Cycladic Marble Head: Ex Goulandris Sculptor


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Directory: Antiques: Regional Art: Ancient World: Greek: Pre AD 1000: Item # 1362607
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This near complete Cycladic marble head is of the "Late Spedos" type, and dates circa 2500-2400 B.C. This beautiful example is approximately 2.8 inches high, by 1.6 inches wide. This piece was likely ceremoniously broken away from the upper shoulders, and is a complete bust with the long graceful neck, save for a break on the upper left section of the head. This piece has many graceful curves seen running from the head to the lower neck, and from the back of the neck to the upper head. The top of the head is also formed by an esoteric arc, and the nose is an elongated facial feature that runs from the top of the forehead down into the middle to the face. The nose also graduates in size from the top to the bottom, and has a curve that matches the curvature of the head when viewed from the side. The conventions art noted above are all attributed to the "Goulandris Sculptor", who was one of the most prolific sculptors of Cycladic figurines during this period. Another example with a near analogous shape was offered at Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2014, no. 62. ($80,000.00-$120,000.00 estimates, $160,000.00 realized. This piece is approximately 5.9 inches high, and is approximately twice the size as the example offered here. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is not only analogous in shape and design as the Christie's example noted above, but the surface condition and deposits are nearly identical as well. The piece offered here also has some attractive light brown mineral deposits, and is slightly heavier on the front of the piece. Overall, the piece offered here is an extremely fine example for the period, and is rare on the market. For the type see: "Early Cycladic Art in North American Collections", Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, University of Washington Press, 1987. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: