| Ascot Court Antiques | Chinese ceramics and works of art |

19th c Late Qing Famille Rose Ginger Jar, Hard Wood Stand & Cover

19th c Late Qing Famille Rose Ginger Jar, Hard Wood Stand & Cover


browse these categories for related items...
Directory: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Chinese: Porcelain: Pre 1900: Item # 1372866

Please refer to our stock # GFM061721 when inquiring.
Ascot Court Antiques
View Seller Profile
15 Waterman Place
Saint Louis, MO 63112
(617) 999 - 3479

Guest Book
 This item is currently being auctioned 
This item is currently being auctioned

Late Qing Famille Rose Floral Jar (GFM061721)
c. 1860 - 1880s, late Qing Dynasty
Porcelain with overglaze famille rose enamels
Height: 19.7 cm (jar alone), 28 cm (including custom stand and lid)
Diameter (at widest point): 24 cm
From an Arvada, Colorado estate

A lovely and charming late Qing ginger jar, its pleasingly rotund body decorated with famille rose enamels depicting various floral sprigs and auspicious insects. The neck is further enhanced with a ruyi collar, while a lappet band occupies the bottom. The fresh, pastel tones of the enamels are consistent with famille rose porcelain produced during the Daoguang and Tongzhi eras.

The original porcelain lid is missing. In its place, the jar was custom-fitted with a carved hardwood lid and stand during the republic period. Matching old labels with "no. 7" written on them can be found on the base of the jar and on base of the wood stand, suggesting they were paired as a set. Both lid and stand are included for sale with the jar.

Condition: The porcelain jar is in good antique condition (no hairlines, no restorations). The mouth rim of the jar has some very tiny fleabites to the glaze (see picture); this is a minor issue consistent with the age of the jar. Due to the age, there is some expected wear to the surface of the enamels. The cover and stand were custom made and fitted to this jar during the republic period. [Please examine all photos carefully, as they are part of the condition report. Any material condition clearly visible in photographs is considered to have been disclosed and described.]