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Chinese Ming Dynasty Emperor Xuande Imperial white and blue porcelain

Chinese Ming Dynasty Emperor Xuande Imperial white and blue porcelain


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Directory: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Chinese: Porcelain: Pre 1492: Item # 1364908

Please refer to our stock # 015 when inquiring.
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Chinese Ming Dynasty Emperor Xuande Imperial white and blue porcelain bowl fine painted cobalt blue five flowers and 20 pedals of lotus leaves outside wall and a bundle of flower at center of inner bowl, which is for promoting Emperor's authority and grace to his top level officers. size 63/8"x3/38", excellent condition, typical museum quality. Reign: 27 June 1425 – 31 January 1435 Emperor Xuande was a very good painter, and loved art. He was extremely tall. Emperor Xuande’s name means “Proclamation of Virtue.” He was fifth emperor of the Ming dynasty. The eldest son of Emperor Hongxi, Xuande successfully suppressed an early internal rebellion by his uncle Zhu Gaoxu. From that point on, his time of rule was marked by peace with no major revolts or problems within his administration. He followed the example of other emperors, by making frequent tours to inspect conditions in the countryside, where the majority of Chinese lived and worked as farmers. At a time when huge inequalities in tax burdens continued to cause many farmers to leave their farms, in 1430, Xuande ordered tax reductions on all imperial lands. Xuande fought natural calamities, safeguarded the borders, and patronized the arts. He was a fantastic painter, and was exceptionally good at painting animals. In addition, he himself was portrayed in many court portrait paintings. The most well known painting depicts him riding a black steed and wearing a plumed helmet. During his reign, beautiful porcelain objects were produced at the imperial kilns at Jingdezhen in Jiangxi Province. Some of the finest pieces of cloisonné enamelware were also produced during his reign. While his father had wisely eliminated all political influence by the palace eunuchs, Xuande made the monumental mistake of re-introducing power to eunuchs. He established a palace school for eunuchs, and even appointed them as military supervisors. When Xuande died in his early 30s, his eldest son, only seven years old, took the throne.