GlitzQueen Antique and Vintage Jewelry
All Items : Estate Jewelry : Costume : Rhinestone : Pre 1930 item #1338425
GlitzQueen History and Art to Wear
$145
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Most Suffragette jewelry has a stately quality. It tends to be substantial, the better to make its statement at a rally or on the march, atop outerwear. This bijou, by contrast, is on the large side (about 2.5" x 1.5") but it's clearly a party piece.

Such a dazzling confection of diamantes with a bold emerald paste center and dancing drops tipped with faux amethysts may well have been made for celebrations after the vote came through (1920 for all women in the US and 1918 for many in the UK, 1928 for the rest). Alternatively, given its whirling form and shimmering materials, it could refer to Halley's comet, which inspired a lot of jewelry when it appeared in 1910, the last year of the Edwardian era. The design of the brooch could be characterized as transitional or early Deco, but it makes an emphatic nod to Edwardiana in those drops of staggered length. Asymettrical drops were characteristic of Edwardian necklaces known as "negligee" style (nothing to do with nightwear). Still, I'm persuaded by other details of fabrication that 1920 is more probable than 1910.

Provenance is a California estate and condition is, as you see, lovely. Great condition is more common than not for Suffragette pieces, since most saw only short-term use before becoming treasured keepsakes.

There's no charge for insured U.S. shipping, with an equivalent discount on international delivery, and gift-wrap is always free when desired. Please e-mail to confirm availability, order or request more photos. Thanks for looking!
All Items : Estate Jewelry : Costume : Rhinestone : Pre 1940 item #1275825
GlitzQueen History and Art to Wear
$75
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Carmen Miranda, eat your heart out! This is a jewel so devastating that you'll be noticed across the room: It's 2 3/4 inches tall, almost as wide and studded with faceted crystals in red, green, amber, blue and violet -- a "fruit salad" of colors, as they used to say.

Besides wearing it in the usual way, clipped to a pocket, lapel, scarf or neckline, it would look great on a ribbon as a choker necklace -- or on a hat or headband -- or on a purse or even at the wrist of a glove. The styling possibilities are just about endless.

It's helpful that the gilded, slightly concave backing - intricately detailed with grapes, leaves and a foo-foo border - is light and easy to wear on any fabric. The material must be wood or early plastic and condition is great, with only age-appropriate wear to the gilding at the outer edges -- and not much of that. All rhinestones are as vividly colorful as on the day there were made and the hinged clip is in perfect working order. Probable dating would be early 1930s and provenance is (bet you guessed it) a California estate.

There's no charge for U.S. shipping, with an equivalent discount on international delivery, and gift-wrap is always free on request. Please e-mail to confirm availability, order or request more photos. Thanks for looking!
All Items : Estate Jewelry : Costume : Rhinestone : Pre 1900 item #1270927
GlitzQueen History and Art to Wear
$135
reduced from $165.
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There's nothing more romantic than moonlight, especially when you can wear it everywhere -- like on your shoulder or your bag or a ribbon in your hair!

This antique crescent moon brooch is quintessential Victoriana, carried to a dazzling extreme. As you know if you collect 19th century jewelry, the crescent form is often found, but typically in lengths of one or at most two inches. Here's your chance to own the GIANT of the species.

Prong-set with 21 fiery diamond pastes graduated in size, this astonishing jewel has the tube hinge, open C clasp and elongated pinstem right for the period, which we judge to be circa 1860 - 1880. The reverse shows age-appropriate surface wear and the gilt brass setting could stand cleaning, but condition is otherwise terrific. Provenance is a New Mexico estate and probable origin is American.

There's no charge for insured U.S. shipping, with an equivalent discount on international delivery, and gift wrap is always free when desired. Please e-mail to confirm availability, order or request more photos. Thanks for looking!
All Items : Estate Jewelry : Costume : Rhinestone : Pre 1900 item #1226860
GlitzQueen History and Art to Wear
$135
reduced from $175.
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Most of us know the discovery of King Tut's tomb in the 1920s led to a craze for Egyptian-styled jewelry. Fewer are aware there were earlier Egyptian crazes (circa 1800, thanks to Napoleon, and again in the 1860s, when the Suez Canal opened). Further, when Tut's treasures toured the world once more in the 1970s, it was "deja vu all over again." Because of this, you always have to look very carefully at jewels with an Egyptian motif, to determine when they were made.

This example, I've decided, is from the Victorian era. It was sold to us as Deco, but the details of fabrication simply aren't 20th century. The piece is clearly hand-crafted in the Arts & Crafts manner. Notice the slight asymmetry between the top and the base, as well as the Etruscan-style granulated surface and, of course, those old paste stones that are nothing like Art Deco century rhinestones. The tall columns of blue glass seem modern now, but Bohemia was quite capable of making them earlier and I believe this jewel is from there. The jewel also shows more surface wear than is age-appropriate for the 1920s -- certainly not enough to detract from its beauty, but enough to signify great age.

Fashioned on a very grand scale, this marvel measures about 3 1/4" by 1 1/8" and reached us from a Florida estate.

Please e-mail to confirm availability, order or request more photos. There's no charge for insured US shipping, with an equivalent discount for international delivery, and we're always happy to gift-wrap free on request. Thanks for looking.
All Items : Estate Jewelry : Costume : Rhinestone : Pre 1930 item #1220288
GlitzQueen History and Art to Wear
$125

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This is beyond a doubt the most enormous comet brooch I've ever seen: 3 inches tall, more than 2 inches wide and set with layers of sparkling crystal. With a bit of caution, it could become even more dimensional, since the "rays" of the mounting are malleable.

The "Made in Austria" stamp on this beauty tells us it was produced for the export market and that it can't have been crafted prior to 1919 (when the end of WWI dissolved the old Austro-Hungarian Empire). At that age, it could still be a reference to the dazzling 1910 appearance of Halley's Comet, but my guess is that some later comet prompted it, or just comets in general. There were six famous ones in the first 27 years of the 20th century, alone, not to mention the minor examples.

As you'd expect of an Austrian piece, the rhinestones here are of glorious quality. We can't know if all are original, but there are no obvious problems. The metal appears to be silver-plated and it still reads as white metal rather than the underlying brass, despite age-appropriate losses that magnification reveals. Both the extent of surface wear and the white-on-white look suggest an Art Deco dating -- no later than the early 1930s, which makes it antique by American 75-year standards. To me, the 1920s are more likely, based on the type of hinge and clasp and a pinstem that shows evidence of having been shortened (a common and sensible practice after ladies gave up heavy underclothing and their extra-long brooch pins began to draw blood). Provenance is a West Coast estate.

There's no charge for insured U.S. shipping, with an equivalent discount on international delivery,and gift-wrap is always free when desired. Please e-mail erinharris@comcast.net to confirm availability, order or request more photos. Thanks for looking!
All Items : Estate Jewelry : Costume : Rhinestone : Pre 1930 item #1191836
GlitzQueen History and Art to Wear
$75
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As you know if you collect Suffragette jewelry, rings are rare; in the past, we've had fewer than half a dozen. Perhaps they're scarce because other types of jewelry made a bigger splash when worn at public meetings and marches. That's my guess because Suffragette brooches, necklaces and earrings tend to be quite bold. The rings are showy, too, but necessarily on a somewhat daintier scale.

The ring you see here is big enough to cover my knuckle, with a face 3/4 of an inch tall and half an inch wide. The four faux gemstones are sizeable,too: a pair of amethysts, a diamond and a very dark green emerald, all prettily cut and prong-set. The quirky color combination held deep meaning among 19th century and early 20th century feminists, for whom green represented hope, purple signified dignity and white stood for purity. The language we associate with "regard" jewelry applied, too: The "G" of green, "W" of white and "V" of violet comprised an abbreviation for Give Women (the) Vote. All this seems cryptic now, but was clearly understood by everyone in an era when messages were also communicated by which flowers you sent, how you held your fan and which corner of a calling card you folded down, if any. Tucked away and forgotten for decades, Suffragette jewelry began rapidly gaining value after the movie "Iron Jawed Angels" appeared in 2004, revealing what the gals went through (including hunger strikes and beatings).

The original owner of this ring may have been in the thick of the conflict, since it reached us from a New York estate. While it could date from as late as 1928, when the last group of Englishwomen (not property owners) got the vote, the rope-twist oval of the mounting and the witchy, talon-like prongs show Victorian and Arts & Crafts influences, so suggest a rather early dating, soon after World War I or even before. Too, although the gilded white metal setting remains bright on its face, the gilt is nearly gone from the shank -- which obviously indicates age and wear. Apart from this loss of gilding and minor surface wear to the stones, which look original, I see no problem with the ring. It's certainly sturdy enough to wear often, although not as heavy, large or well-made as other Suffragette rings we'e sold. That's why the price is enticingly low -- so why not pick up an unusual conversation piece for less than half the usual cost? There's no charge for insured U.S. shipping, with an equivalent discount on international delivery, and gift-wrap is always free on request. Please e-mail to confirm availability, order or request more photos. Thanks for looking!
All Items : Estate Jewelry : Costume : Rhinestone : Pre 1910 item #1114141
GlitzQueen History and Art to Wear
$145
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Big, bold brooches are popping up on the best shoulders this season. If you've been looking for one that will make all the rest pale by comparison, you've found it now!

This glittering monster is absolutely astounding: 3 1/2 inches tall, more than 2 inches wide, styled with so many swirls that the exotic flower seems to be dancing and paved all over with faceted pastes in vivid colors. Shades of green, citrine and cognac appear, as well as the red-orange dominant on the petals of what looks like a tiger lily or a parrot tulip.

It's quite a heavy jewel, given its size and the pot metal setting, so it benefits greatly from the presence of an early safety clasp. That may have been added later, probably when the elongated pinstem was snipped from even greater length. If the safety is original, dating can't be before this sort was invented in 1902. I think the brooch is somewhat older, though, based on the type of hinge and pinstem -- and, for the same reason, we can rule out its being a later Victorian Revival piece.

The brooch reached us from a Minnesota estate and in lovely condition, relative to age. There are a few areas of discoloration at the back and the pin is a bit wavy, but all the many stones are intact and it takes high magnification to notice even light surface wear anywhere on the side that shows.

There's no charge for insured U.S. shipping -- with an equivalent discount on international delivery -- and gift wrap is also free if desired. Please e-mail to confirm availability, order or request more photos. Thanks for looking!
All Items : Estate Jewelry : Costume : Rhinestone : Pre 1910 item #1109796
GlitzQueen History and Art to Wear
$125

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Suffragette jewelry is loaded with symbology based on colors, but this fascinating antique brooch adds another layer to the story via its horseshoe form. It's both a lucky charm and a feminist message -- a combination I've never seen before, but why not? Certainly, the Suffragettes could've used more luck; they suffered through a lot to win the vote for women.

As you know if you collect Suffragette jewelry, its quirky mix of colors held deep meaning for those who wore it. Green represented hope, purple signified dignity and white stood for the purity of their intentions. The language we associate with "regard" jewelry applied, too: The "G" of green, "W" of white and "V" of violet comprised an abbreviation for Give Women (the) Vote. All this seems cryptic now, but it was clearly understood by everyone in an era when messages were also communicated by which flowers you sent, how you held your fan and which corner of a calling card you folded down, if any.

Possibly because it did double-duty, this brooch has seen more wear than the typical Suffragette jewel. Often, they look nearly like new because of being worn only to meetings and marches, then tucked away after female suffrage was achieved. Here we have a brooch in good, but not perfect, condition. The stones appear original, all with matching pointed tops, and the fastening system is right for the period (complete with elongated pinstem); however, it seems a bit of brass is missing from one end of the "shoe". I didn't notice this until I was taking pictures, so the loss isn't much of a detraction. No doubt a good jeweler could craft the missing piece, if it bothers you.

Overall size is about an inch in both directions and provenance is a Pennsylvania estate.

Please e-mail to confirm availability, order or request more photos. There's no charge for insured U.S. Priority shipping, with an equivalent discount on international delivery. Gift-wrap is always free when desired. Thanks for looking!
All Items : Estate Jewelry : Costume : Rhinestone : Pre 1920 item #1062911
GlitzQueen History and Art to Wear
$185
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This breathtaking brooch, which can also be worn beautifully as a pendant or hair ornament, dates from soon after the First World War, but has a decidedly 19th century look. In fact, its girandole form with three gracefully swaying drops dates from the 18th century, but Queen Victoria kept it popular via her passion for wearing jewels made for her grandmother, Queen Charlotte.

Also evoking earlier times is the dazzling array of multi-colored stones favored in the Austro-Hungarian Empire, which World War I ended. The brooch's "Czecho" stamp -- the first signature used after Czech independence -- reminds us of how Eastern Europe was reshaped in 1918. Still, the Imperial tastes survived beautifully for a brief while. Long known for producing the finest art glass gems, this region was also renowned for brilliant enameling and fancy gilt filigree metalwork. Here we see it all come together in lavish "Last Gasp of the Old Austro-Hungarian Empire" style.

The brooch is of significant size (2.5 by 2.75 inches) and in fine condition, showing surprisingly little wear even on the brightly gilded reverse. In deference to the purists among us, we've left it in as-found condition, but you may want to touch the small patches of verdigris with a bit of vinegar to neutralize them so they won't spread, then dab the vinegar away with a little water. It's a good idea to do this, whenever you notice greenish areas on your antique treasures.

This rare and splendid piece reached us from a California estate. Its safety clasp is of the type introduced around 1890, with two levers instead of one; the hinge is the old 19th century type, which lets the pinstem wobble a bit from side to side; and the pinstem shows evidence of being snipped and filed down at some time -- which is great for safety, since the extra-long ones could so easily draw blood. That's why they phased out during the earliest years of the 20th century, when women stopped wearing layers of intricate underclothing, and seldom appear on items crafted after World War I.

To wear the brooch as a glamorous necklace pendant, just run a narrow ribbon or chain through the filigree at the top.

There's no charge for insured U.S. shipping, with an equivalent discount on international delivery, and gift wrap is always free when desired. Please e-mail erinharris@comcast.net to confirm availability, order or request more photos. Thanks for looking!
All Items : Estate Jewelry : Costume : Rhinestone : Pre 1960 item #1037877
GlitzQueen History and Art to Wear
$80
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Here's a sensational deal on a stunning pair of vintage chandelier earrings loaded with prong-set rhinestones. They're in superb conditon, with no missing or dead stones and very little metal wear. About 5/8 of an inch wide, these drop to a shoulder-dusting 3 inches long. Probable dating is circa 1940-1950 and provenance is a Los Angeles estate. What a glam look for your next adress-up occasion!

I just saw online a pair of new designer earrings practically identical to these -- but priced at $165! The stones are glass and no precious metals are involved, so the price difference isn't based on materials. Why pay extra for modern knockoffs that will only lose their value, when you can invest in genuine historic treasures for LESS?

There's no charge for insured U.S. shipping, with an equivalent discount on international delivery, and gift-wrap is always free on request. Please e-mail to confirm availability, order or request more photos. Thanks for looking!
All Items : Estate Jewelry : Costume : Rhinestone : Pre 1930 item #1030510
GlitzQueen History and Art to Wear
Sold; thank you!
When green, violet and white appear together on historic jewelry, this unusual color combination typically signifies that the piece was first owned by a member of the Suffragette movement -- for whom green represented hope, purple signified dignity and white stood for purity. The language we associate with "regard" jewelry applied, too: The "G" of green, "W" of white and "V" of violet comprised an abbreviation for Give Women (the) Vote. All this seems cryptic now, but was clearly understood by everyone in an era when messages were also communicated by which flowers you sent, how you held your fan and which corner of a calling card you folded down, if any.

To the Suffragettes' efforts through many decades in the U.K. and U.S., we modern women owe our right to vote. That right was finally extended to all American women in 1920 and to all in Great Britain in 1928. Thus, although most of the jewelry is Victorian, Edwardian or transitional, some dates from the Art Deco era.

Probable dating of this spectacular brooch would be 1920s, based on the findings and details of fabrication, as well as the style. Faux diamonds and emeralds are featured, along with a whopping big art glass amethyst and gilding so heavy that the metal is still bright nearly a century later. Surviving Suffragette brooches do tend to be in good shape, because most women wore them only for special events and then tucked them away as mementoes soon after the vote was gained.

Measuring 1.75 inches round, this is a jewel of impressive size and the domed shape adds to its strong presence. Openwork keeps it from being overly weighty, but there's still a good bit of heft. it's something you'd want to wear on a jacket or coat rather than delicate fabrics. The original idea must have been for it to appear on outerwear during women's marches and to be big enough for onlookers not to miss.

Provenance of the brooch is a Houston estate. Origin could be English or American, but the stones are most likely Czech.

Please e-mail to confirm availability, order or requesst more photos. There's no charge for insured U.S. Priority shipping, with an equivalent discount on international delivery. Gift-wrap is always free when desired. Thanks for looking!
All Items : Estate Jewelry : Costume : Rhinestone : Pre 1920 item #1013011
GlitzQueen History and Art to Wear
$125
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Halley's Comet put on a particularly bright show in 1910, inspiring a craze for comet jewelry (as happened also in 1835). Comet brooches are rare, but we watch out for them constantly and have several at the moment. This one is a real dazzler, loaded with old diamond pastes that have lost little of their original sparkle. The white metal setting is in great condition, too, relative to age.

The brooch measures about 1.5 inches in each direction and has an early safety catch and a somewhat elongated pinstem, probably shortened from even greater length (a good idea, since the extra-long type became dangerous after women gave up wearing layers of heavy underclothing). Provenance is a Pennsylvania estate.

Besides wearing this beauty in the usual ways, it would look great on a ribbon as a choker necklace or headband -- or on a hat or a purse -- or turning a scarf into a sash. The styling possibilities are just about endless.

There's no charge for insured U.S. shipping (with an equivalent discount on international delivery) and gift-wrap is always free when desired. Please e-mail to confirm availability, order or request more photos. Thanks for looking!
All Items : Estate Jewelry : Costume : Rhinestone : Pre 1920 item #1010563
GlitzQueen History and Art to Wear
$175

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The "Czecho" signature lets us date this gorgeous Suffragette brooch to the first years of the Czech Republic (established in 1918). The region was previously known as Bohemia, part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire until World War I ended, and Bohemian glass has been prized from medieval times. Jewelry-making was a natural outgrowth of that skill.

Here the gleaming faux-gems and fancy metalwork fully live up to the area's reputation. Besides beautifully faceted pretend diamonds and amethysts, there are shimmering stones that look like green opals, formed in domed lozenge shapes -- and all this opulence rests on a ruffle of fine filigree within a frame that appears granulated with tiny golden beads. As you see, the design is almost entirely comprised of delicate openwork, so it's frankly miraculous that the jewel survived in this condition -- not perfect, by any means, but incredibly good. The gilding is worn and patinated in spots and there are little bends here and there, but all the stones remain well-attached and brilliant and the original fastening mechanism is intact. It's quite a large brooch, nearly 2 inches wide by about 1 3/8 inches tall, and its provenance is a Pennsylvania estate.

As you know if you collect Suffragette jewelry, the unusual color combination held deep meaning among 19th century and early 20th century feminists, for whom green represented hope, purple signified dignity and white stood for purity. The language we associate with "regard" jewelry applied, too: The "G" of green, "W" of white and "V" of violet comprised an abbreviation for Give Women (the) Vote. All this seems cryptic now, but was clearly understood by everyone in an era when messages were also communicated by which flowers you sent, how you held your fan and which corner of a calling card you folded down, if any.

Tucked away and forgotten for decades after women won the vote, Suffragette jewelry began rapidly gaining value when the movie "Iron Jawed Angels" appeared in 2004, revealing what the gals went through (including hunger strikes and beatings). We try our best to maintain a nice selection, but demand keeps growing. If this strikes your fancy, you'd better not delay. The last time we had such an appealing Suffragette brooch, it quickly landed in the collection of former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, author of "Read My Pins".

There's no charge for insured U.S. shipping, with an equivalent discount on international delivery. Please e-mail erinharris@comcast.net to confirm availability, order or request more photos. Thanks for looking!
All Items : Estate Jewelry : Costume : Rhinestone : Pre 1920 item #1009718
GlitzQueen History and Art to Wear
On Hold
As you know if you collect Suffragette jewelry, affordable rings are extremely rare. Compared to brooches, necklaces and bracelets, few rings were made and most of those were custom creations featuring gold and genuine gems.

This unusual example -- done in white metal with pretend purple jade, pearls and emeralds -- is also remarkable for its size: The face measures an inch in diameter and rises 3/4 of an inch above the hand. Nobody could miss seeing it, when the original owner wore it on a march or to a meeting, which of course was the idea!

This quirky color combination held deep meaning among 19th century and early 20th century feminists, for whom green represented hope, purple signified dignity and white stood for purity. The language we associate with "regard" jewelry applied, too: The "G" of green, "W" of white and "V" of violet comprised an abbreviation for Give Women (the) Vote. It seems cryptic now, but was clearly understood by everyone in an era when messages were also communicated by which flowers you sent, how you held your fan and which corner of a calling card you folded down, if any.

Tucked away and forgotten for decades, Suffragette jewelry began rapidly gaining value when the movie "Iron Jawed Angels" debuted in 2004, revealing what the gals went through (including hunger strikes and beatings) before all women achieved in the vote in the US in 1920 and the UK in 1928. We try our best to maintain a good selection of pieces, but demand keeps growing. When you spot a piece you like, it's often wise not to delay.

Because the jewels weren't used on a daily basis, they tend to survive in great shape. The condition of this one, however, is a little rough, explaining why the price is so low. There's definite wear to the metal finish, which looks like tarnish on old silver and doesn't detract much. On the plus side, all the stones appear to be original and I believe the adjustable shank is original, too. Because the style has an Art Nouveau look, probably the ring was made before World War I. Its provenance is a Midwestern estate.

There's no charge for insured U.S. shipping (with an equivalent discount on international delivery) and gift-wrap is always free on request. Please e-mail erinharris@comcast.net to confirm availability, order or request more photos. Thanks for looking!
All Items : Estate Jewelry : Costume : Rhinestone : Pre 1900 item #1002975
GlitzQueen History and Art to Wear
$195

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As you know if you collect Art Nouveau, authentic "lady portrait" jewels have become extremely expensive and hard to find. Even later reproductions are soaring in cost, so you simply can't go wrong with this true Victorian treasure at our fabulous price.

Making it even more exceptional, it features TWO portrait heads, brilliant Bohemian ruby and emerald pastes and wonderful Arabesque tracery. Adding further to the exotic look that pays tribute to the Victorian love of travel, these Art Nouveau beauties wear elaborate headscarves that evoke North Africa. The gilt finish, well-preserved and beautifully patinated by time, has the rosy cast favored in the 1890s.

The brooch -- which could easily double as a necklace by pinning it to a ribbon choker -- measures about 1 3/8 inches round, is highly dimensional and has a nice heft that indicates quality. Proper nineteeth-century hardware is present: a clasp of the open "C" type and a hinge of the sort introduced in the 1850s. At some point the pinstem, which would have extended well beyond the brooch, was snipped and filed to a new point -- not a bad idea, since the old elongated pins became dangerous when women gave up wearing layers of underclothing. The hinge may have been reattached or replaced, since flux is visible around it; however, the area is gilded over, so could have been like this all along.

Provenance of the brooch is a Kentucky estate, but I suspect it originated in the British Isles -- based on the four-petal background pattern suggesting a shamrock and the whimsical stylized heart formed by the scarves’ tails. You could look a long time for an Art Nouveau portrait brooch as unusual and charming as this!

There's no charge for U.S. shipping, with an equivalent discount on international delivery, and gift-wrap is always free when desired. Please e-mail to confirm availability, order or request more photos. Thanks for looking!
All Items : Estate Jewelry : Costume : Rhinestone : Pre 1920 item #997933
GlitzQueen History and Art to Wear
$135
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We still express love with roses and diamonds, but the symbology of romance has narrowed considerably since its 19th century heyday. In those days, increasing ardor was conveyed through an elaborate language of flowers and gemstones, and even by the fold of a calling card or how a lady held her fan.

Victorian honeymoon souvenirs were more romantic, too -- often including symbolic jewels like these. At times the moon and a bee appear together on one piece of jewelry, but the popularity of "scatter" pins that began around the turn of the 20th century resulted in sets that allowed for more creative arrangements. For instance, a lady wearing these brooches might nestle the bee within the crescent moon, pin it on her shoulder above one horn of the moon or place the pins on opposite lapels. Each could also be worn independently, when she was no longer a newlywed or when romance didn't suit the occasion.

It's quite rare to find a set still together, but these two pieces managed to survive the past century as a pair. That's romantic, in its own right.

From an Ohio estate which contained a great deal of Late Victorian, Edwardian and transitional jewelry, these pins probably date from the World War I era (based on the early safety clasps), but all the stones are still dazzling and it takes magnification to notice any wear to the silver metal. The crescent moon set with 6 clear pastes and 3 creamy faux pearls is a whopper -- 2.75 inches tall -- and the darling bee set with 6 clear pastes measures about 1 inch x 1 inch. Origin is most likely Czech, given the quality of the stones.

You could search a long time to find an equally enchanting gift for a bride. We'll be happy to gift-wrap free on request and there's no charge for insured U.S. Priority shipping, with an equivalent discount for international delivery. Please e-mail to confirm availability or request more photos. Thanks for looking!
All Items : Estate Jewelry : Costume : Rhinestone : Pre 1920 item #945447
GlitzQueen History and Art to Wear
On Hold
The "Czecho" signature on these lovely Suffragette earrings lets us date them precisely to the first years of the Czech Republic (established in 1918). The region was previously known as Bohemia, part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire until World War I ended. Bohemian glass has been prized from medieval times and the stones here certainly live up to the area's reputation. Its enamelwork was admired, too, and that features here, as well.

Although the dating is technically transitional, falling between the death of King Edward and the period dominated by geometric Art Deco style, these earrings are extremely Edwardian in spirit, so would have been crafted soon after the war. The screw backs are also right for that period, when women found ear-piercing rather barbaric.

I especially love the fresh apple green of the emerald-cut faux peridots, which repeats in tiny round stones on both white-enameled blossoms. Stronger hues come into play, in accents of faux emerald and amethyst.

As you know if you collect Suffragette jewelry, this unusual color combination held deep meaning among 19th century and early 20th century feminists, for whom green represented hope, purple signified dignity and white stood for purity. The language we associate with "regard" jewelry applied, too: The "G" of green, "W" of white and "V" of violet comprised an abbreviation for Give Women (the) Vote. All this seems cryptic now, but was clearly understood by everyone in an era when messages were also communicated by which flowers you sent, how you held your fan and which corner of a calling card you folded down, if any.

Measuring about 3/4 of an inch tall and a 5/8 of an inch wide, these are large enough to be noticed easily, but not overpowering. They reached us from a St. Louis estate in superb condition -- not unusual, because Suffragette jewels were worn typically for meetings and marches, rather than on an everyday basis. Assuming careful storage, the stones and even the gilt metal settings can look practically new. In this case, only the actual screws have darkened with age, since those weren't gilded.

Tucked away and forgotten for decades after women won the vote, Suffragette jewelry began rapidly gaining value when the movie "Iron Jawed Angels" appeared in 2004, revealing what the gals went through (including hunger strikes and beatings). We try our best to maintain a good selection, but demand keeps growing. If these strike your fancy, you'd better not delay.

There's no charge for insured U.S. shipping, with an equivalent discount on international delivery. Please e-mail erinharris@comcast.net to confirm availability, order or request more photos. Thanks for looking!
All Items : Estate Jewelry : Costume : Rhinestone : Pre 1930 item #720684
GlitzQueen History and Art to Wear
$140


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These antique dangle earrings are as stylish now as they were about a hundred years ago in Edwardian and Art Deco times. The very vertical look of their extra-long drops is exactly what we see gracing fashion runways and red carpet occasions today. They move beautifully, too, since the teardrops are articulated to sway with your every step or sigh. Loaded with color, these treasures are pavé-set with aquamarine pastes of four different sizes and such fabulous quality that every stone remains brilliant. I expect they're of Czech origin (more properly Bohemian, if made before World War I ended).

The metal isn't marked, but responds to polish like silver, so must have fairly high silver content. With apologies to the purists among us, I removed some tarnish from the backs after these photos were taken.

Overall length is about 2.75 inches, provenance is a New York estate and, as you see, condition is lovely. Your jeweler could easily remove the screw backs and install posts, if you like, since the rings holding the drops are attached to the posy-shaped tops, not just the fasteners.

There's no charge for insured U.S. shipping, with an equivalent discount on international delivery, and gift-wrap is always free when desired. Please e-mail to confirm availability, order or request more photos. Thanks for looking!