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2017 Holiday Discount! Valid from November 27, 2017 thru December 17, 2017: Items priced $100 to $999, 10% off; Items priced over $1000, 15% off.
All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #1303344 (stock #BA927)
Stonegate Antiques
$155.00
Measuring 21 inches in length, this very handsomely attired, gentleman golliwog doll hails from the early 1950's and remains in near pristine condition. Displayed under glass all of these years, his clothing retains good color and is free of soiling with the exception of his white cotton vest which has one small spot on either side that are both nicely concealed when his jacket is set properly in place. (Clothing is removable if the new owner wishes to launder.)

The golly's clothing is machine stitched; his red mouth and white eyeballs are constructed of felt. His body is tightly stuffed with cotton batting allowing him to be displayed either in a sitting position or standing with the support of a doll stand.

A brief history of the Golliwog doll: The Golliwog is based on a Black minstrel doll that the Victorian era illustrator, Florence Kate Upton, born in 1873 of English parents, had played with as a small child in New York. Upton's Golliwog character was first introduced to the world in her 1895 book entitled The Adventures of Two Dutch Dolls. Like the rag doll that inspired it, the Golliwog in her book was an ugly creature with very dark, jet black skin, large white-rimmed eyes, red clown lips, and wild, frizzy hair. Golliwogs are typically male and are generally dressed in a jacket, trousers, bow tie, and stand-up collar in a combination of red, white, blue, black, and occasionally yellow colors.

A very sweet piece!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #442134 (stock #BA552)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Measuring just 3" x 3", this very rarely found tin mechanical toy features the beloved Golliwog character!

Marked "Made in Germany US Zone" on Golly's pant leg, this toy is in wonderful, barely-used condition with just the tiniest degree of scratching wherever metal rubs metal during toy movement. To operate the toy, one simply squeezes the metal lever on the back, which causes the clown to hit poor Golly on the head with a mallet!

An EXTREMELY RARE toy as a VERY LIMITED number were made only during the US occupation of post World War II Germany!

A brief history of the Golliwog doll: The Golliwog is based on a Black minstrel doll that the Victorian era illustrator, Florence Kate Upton, born in 1873, had played with as a small child in New York. Upton's Golliwog character was first introduced to the world in her 1895 book entitled The Adventures of Two Dutch Dolls. Like the rag doll that inspired it, the Golliwog in her book was an ugly creature with very dark, jet black skin, large white-rimmed eyes, red clown lips, and wild, frizzy hair. Golliwogs are typically male and are generally dressed in a jacket, trousers, bow tie, and stand-up collar in a combination of red, white, blue, black, and occasionally yellow colors.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #364916 (stock #BA444)
Stonegate Antiques
$185.00
Measuring 3 /12 inches high x 5 ¼ inches wide x 3 inches deep, this early 1950’s, USA-made, plastic, Yellow Aunt Jemima Recipe Box has seen some use but remains quite visually striking and in very good condition!

Manufactured by FOSTA Products, this highly sought after piece of Black Memorabilia shows some wear to the gold lettered word, “RECIPES”, although the majority of the paint remains intact. Small paint rubs are present here and there on Aunt Jemima’s face as seen in photos. The tiny plastic knob on the left side of the box that acts as a hinge for the cover is missing, but this minor imperfection detracts little from the fabulous color contrast and visual appeal of this delightful and essential, vintage piece of early 50’s Black Americana!

Please see the RED Aunt Jemima Fosta Recipe Box available for purchase separately.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1970 item #272518 (stock #BA393)
Stonegate Antiques
$65.00
Measuring 23 inches long x 4 inches wide, this circa 1960's, sweet, little black man, sewing caddy is constructed primarily of felt with metal and plastic decorative detailing.

Quite multi-purpose in nature, his legs hold spools of thread, and under his red vest, he hides a pincushion (his chest) along with 2 felt strips for needle and pin storage (his arms)! Four decorative plastic rings can be used to hold safety pins! He also sports a ring on the top of his hat to allow one to hang him on the wall.

Condition is quite fine! No rips, stains or tears with just some subtle fading to his green felt bowtie and black face and legs--all age-related. He has two, insignificant moth holes on the BACK of his red vest.

Handy to keep by the sewing machine, but also just a delightful, vintage, Black Memorabilia whimsy to decorate your sewing room!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Decorations : Holiday : Ornaments : Pre 1900 item #1216421 (stock #BA869)
Stonegate Antiques
$1,995.00
Once part of the Middle Passage Museum benefactor's inventory, these authentic and extraordinarily RARE, Slave Ship shackles have been de-accessioned from the personal collection of the museum's anonymous Georgia benefactor who is cited below.

These iron, hand-forged, 19th century slave ship shackles were purchased back in the early 1960’s out of a family estate in New Orleans, Louisiana, whose 18th and 19th century ancestors were involved in the slave trade. The shackles remain all-original and untouched with fifteen very heavy chain links that vary in size, measuring a total of 40 inches in length when positioned in a straight line. The cuff size is enormous with diameter measurements of 4.75 and 4.25 inches each; the heft and weight of each cuff is quite impressive. This very weighty set was designed to immobilize when the two circular links were attached to another locking shackle on the interior wall of the ship. An utterly horrible, tangible testament to the malevolence of slavery.

The anonymous museum benefactor from Georgia kept this particular set aside from those items he had planned to donate to the Middle Passage Museum due to the rarity in opportunity of acquiring slave ship shackles---the only set he acquired in his many years of collecting which began in the early 1950's before the collectible field of Black Americana was popular or even socially or politically acceptable.

Also currently offered for sale and priced separately are a rarely found, 19thC Slave Rattle Shackle out of the Charleston, South Carolina area and a set of early 19th century, child/young adolescent - size, Slave Crab Rattle Shackles. Please type the word "shackles" in the search box on our home page to find these sets of shackles.

The Middle Passage Museum was the dream of Jim and Mary Anne Petty of Mississippi as well as that of an anonymous Georgian benefactor who had together compiled a collection of slave artifacts numbering over 15,000 pieces and who had hoped to find a permanent site in Mobile, Alabama, for their museum. While they formed a non-profit organization to raise funds for their hoped-for museum, their dream was never realized.

In a 2003 statement, Jim Petty remarked, "The importance of the exhibit of these artifacts is to understand the harshness of what slavery and segregation was all about. The items in the exhibit remind us of the terrible heinousness of slavery. Viewing the collection can be very emotional, but it is a tool through which we can understand, honor and respect a great culture. We want to realize that out of slavery, a great culture emerged, and carried on, and continued to strive for a better life regardless of the adverse conditions that were placed upon them."

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #365260 (stock #BA450)
Stonegate Antiques
$80.00
Measuring 8 3/4 inches long x 6 ½ inches wide, this very charming, circa 1920-1930’s key or pot holder hanger is entirely hand-made- and is a fabulous example of early American Folk Art!

Constructed of hand-cut, ¼ inch wide, black painted wood, this darling little black girl has hand-painted eyes and smiling lips, and is dressed in a hand and machine stitched, cloth-stuffed, one piece, black, tan and green dress! She has a hole in each ear, a metal hanging loop atop her head and one metal hook on each shoe for hanging keys or potholders!

She is in fine condition given her 70+ years of age and has great “patina”. Some minor paint loss, a few teeny holes in her outfit, but very visually appealing Black Americana Folk Art, none the less!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #1209250 (stock #BA859)
Stonegate Antiques
$965.00
De-accessioned from the inventory of the ill-fated Middle Passage Museum (see museum history below), this very unusual, 19th century, estate document from Sumter County, Georgia is offered for sale, the purpose of which was to itemize and execute a division of property from the estate of the deceased, southern, plantation owner.

This is a partial document missing its beginning and end pages, therefore, the name of the deceased slave owner and the date of the document is not known. HOWEVER, the document remains EXTRAORDINARILY RARE AND UNUSUAL as it proceeds to, first, categorize the 40 slaves using the word SLAVES instead of Negroes, and secondly, proceeds to list the male slaves BY NAME, ALONG WITH NAMES OF THEIR WIVES AND THEIR CHILDREN, with monetary value listed in the right column of the document!!!! In two instances, the number of years married is also listed! Children are labeled "Girl, "Boy", or "Infant". Total value of these 40 slaves was calculated at $24,200.00

Such documents listing ENTIRE SLAVE FAMILIES BY NAME is simply not found, as slaves were viewed as property, not individuals with rights and privileges who had wives and children, the whole of which, constituted a family. It would indeed be a phenomenal piece of history to be able to identify the plantation and/or deceased slave owner as such an estate listing speaks to an uncommon, albeit, rare and unique perspective of slave ownership. Such a listing makes this particular document all the more heart-wrenching, and it certainly begs the very sad question of whether or not these slave families were allowed to remain united and intact once the final estate disposition was conducted.

The document measures approximately 8 1/2 inches wide x 14 1/8 inches long, is double-sided and is in good condition, with fold lines evident along with some age-related foxing at top and bottom fold lines. 1 3/4 tear along the fold line of the top fold at right edge. The ink color is sepia toned (likely as a result of some fading over time) on a pale blue, vertically-ruled, heavy paper. This phenomenal piece of cultural ephemera is ready for appropriate archival preservation/framing.

The listing of slaves is on the back side of the document with the front side listing farm animals, equipment and supplies along with values- "The following property set apart for the use and benefit of the farm".

The Middle Passage Museum was the dream of Jim and Mary Anne Petty of Mississippi as well as that of an anonymous Georgian benefactor who had together compiled a collection of slave artifacts numbering over 15,000 pieces and who had hoped to find a permanent site in Mobile, Alabama, for their museum. While they formed a non-profit organization to raise funds for their hoped-for museum, their dream was never realized.

In a 2003 statement, Jim Petty remarked, "The importance of the exhibit of these artifacts is to understand the harshness of what slavery and segregation was all about. The items in the exhibit remind us of the terrible heinousness of slavery. Viewing the collection can be very emotional, but it is a tool through which we can understand, honor and respect a great culture. We want to realize that out of slavery, a great culture emerged, and carried on, and continued to strive for a better life regardless of the adverse conditions that were placed upon them."

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Nostalgia : School : Pre 1900 item #129972 (stock #G287)
Stonegate Antiques
$125.00
Elaborate graphics which include the California State Seal adds to the importance of this authentic, museum-quality, 1892, TEACHING LICENSE / DIPLOMA issued by the STATE OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO COUNTY, DEPARTMENT of PUBLIC INSTRUCTION.

Text indicates that the diploma was awarded to Mary L. Downey on January 15, 1892, and certified her to teach the Grammar or Primary Grade for the subsequent 6 years. Signed by 5 members of the California State Board of Education.

Further documentation on reverse reads, "Issued on the recommendation of the Board of Education of San Francisco, in accordance with Section 1521 of the Political Code, upon a first grade or Grammar Grade Certificate of San Francisco, 86.7% (Mary’s test grade).”

With the exception of early fold lines, condition is mint! Measures 8 inches X 10.5 inches.

See my other items for an 1899 Teaching Certificate awarded to Mary's sister, Josephine Downey.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #264039 (stock #BA13)
Stonegate Antiques
$325.00
A very RARE and highly appealing Black Memorabilia Advertising Diecut!

Marked "Copyright 1924", in the lower left hand corner, this extremely hard-to-find advertising piece measures 10.5 inches wide x 13.5 inches high. Colorful and visually interesting, the heavy cardboard diecut depicts an engaging Uncle Wabash serenely strumming his banjo on his front porch! Guess the message to the consumer was, "Eat one of Uncle Wabash's cupcakes to experience your own little slice of heaven and serenity!"

Condition of this charming piece of Black Historical ephemera is quite good given its 80+ years of age!! Old water staining to bottom of the diecut does little to detract from the piece. Crease line to one cupcake edge. Appropriate age foxing to back.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #706539 (stock #BA669)
Stonegate Antiques
$295.00
Measuring 7.75 inches high, this fabulous late 1940's French business card holder celebrates the iconic Josephine Baker!

The statuette is constructed of lucite and is placed on a painted wood base. The piece is very nicely hand-painted and detailed. It depicts Ms. Baker in her famous banana skin skirt, wearing large loop earrings and holding her long, slender, silver cigarette holder. Her anatomical assets are duly accented in aluminum. The base is constructed utilizing the Art Deco design styling of the 1930's--the decade in which Ms. Baker first acquired her fame. The card holder, itself, is also aluminum.

Condition is mint with just the teeniest of surface scratches here and there apparent only when the piece is held to the light. Some slight pitting to the aluminum card holder edges.

Josephine Baker (June 3, 1906 – April 12, 1975) was an American-born French entertainer, most noted for her celebrated Folies Bergère singing career. In her early career, she was a feted dancer and is often credited as a movie star, although she only starred in 3 films in her early career. She was given the nicknames "Black Venus" or "Black Pearl" and "Créole Goddess", while in France she was known in the old theatrical tradition as "La Baker". She became a citizen of France in 1937. She is also credited for her contributions to the Civil Rights Movement in North America and for being an inspiration to generations of African-American female entertainers.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Nostalgia : School : Pre 1900 item #129975 (stock #G126)
Stonegate Antiques
$275.00
An ornately detailed, historical graphic of the California State Seal adds to the importance of this authentic and extremely rare, museum-quality, 1859, TEACHING and PRINCIPAL’s LICENSE / DIPLOMA issued by the STATE OF CALIFORNIA, and the City and County of SAN FRANCISCO, DEPARTMENT of PUBLIC INSTRUCTION, just 9 years after California became the 31st state.

Text indicates that this early diploma was awarded to Mr. O. P. Sarle on January 5, 1859. This “Certificate of Approval” found him qualified “with respect to Learning Utility and Moral Character” to not only teach but administer as Principal at the Grammar School Grade for “one year unless sooner revoked by the board”. Signed by five individuals constituting the Examining Board and the President of the Superintendent of Schools.

Measures 14 inches X 16.5 inches. Labeled lower left corner: "Fishbourne's Litho. Ohio Street San Francisco". With the exception of early fold lines, condition is mint!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Nostalgia : School : Pre 1940 item #130031 (stock #G191F)
Stonegate Antiques
$18.00
These wonderful circa 1930's school crayons manufactured by Milton Bradley of Springfield, Massachusetts, are in near mint condition with the exception of very, very light surface soiling to cardboard paper box! Crayons are unused and are all original!

In addition to making children's games, The Milton Bradley Company, for many, many years, produced an extensive array of school supplies, equipment, and materials!

A wonderful addition to School or Artist Memorabilia collection!

Although two boxes are pictured in the photo, sale is for ONE BOX ONLY.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1151416 (stock #BA832)
Stonegate Antiques
$295.00
Measuring 17 inches long, this delightful, folk-art styled, cloth, black Mammy doll was made circa 1920's.

Detailing in construction sets this mammy doll apart! Her creation was very carefully executed through a combination of hand and machine stitching. Mammy was lovingly dressed in clothing made from old, red, black, and white-patterned handkerchiefs, while both her body and her interesting pair of black pantaloons were constructed of old, black stockings. Detailing was clearly important to the creator--an additional and elegant surprise is the cream-colored, cotton petticoat edged with lace!

Mammy's face is hand-embroidered, and she wears brass-colored, plain, hoop earrings. Her body is machine-stitched together and is stuffed with cotton batting.

Mammy is in near perfect condition with the exception of minor wear (not holes) to her stocking-constructed left foot as well as the underside of her right, stocking-constructed hand. (This wear to the fabric may well be the very reason the stockings were used to construct Mammy as they may have been discarded from personal use. Please refer to photos to view wear.)

Mammy is simply full of charm with lovely and creative detailing! A quite difficult-to-find-in-this condition, 80+-year-old, cloth mammy doll!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Nostalgia : Advertising : Pre 1960 item #141135 (stock #G400)
Stonegate Antiques
$15.00
This vintage 1940's cardboard advertising fan for the Petersburg Furniture Company, Inc., located at 100 North Sycamore Street, Petersburg, Virginia, measures 12" long x 7 " wide and is mounted on a wooden stick handle.

Featuring a double heart motif, the advertising slogan spouts, "When Two Hearts Beat As One, It's Time To Buy Your Furniture From "Old Reliable" Petersburg Furniture Company, "Petersburg's Oldest Furniture Store!

Neat mid-20th-century advertising piece in very fine original condition!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #1273723 (stock #BA836)
Stonegate Antiques
$85.00
This charming grouping of vintage, wooden, Black Porter and Mammy clothes brushes were all made in the 1930's by the Rhody Brush Company of Woonsocket, Rhode Island.

All seven of these colorful brushes have natural bristles, and range in height from 7.5 inches and 8 inches tall to the smaller, 4.5 inches tall, green and red-dressed little Mammy brushes.

The three black railroad porter brushes, the large red Mammy brush with cloth bow and the small red Mammy brush are all in near excellent condition with evidence of having been very lightly used as described:

Blue Porter with Cream colored pants: teeny, superficial "dings" to paint here and there with one teeny mark between the eyes.
Black and Cream Porter: teeny, superficial "dings" to paint here and there with one teeny mark near the mouth; paint wear to edges of cap.
Yellow Porter: paint wear primarily to right side of face and top of cap.
Large Red Mammy with Cloth Bow: paint in excellent condition with a couple tiny rubs here and there. Natural bristles have faint trace of original red painted dots to natural bristle skirt.
Small Red Mammy: paint in excellent condition; faint trace of original red dots on natural bristle skirt.

The following two brushes are also in very nice, barely used condition with minor imperfection as described below:

Large Red Mammy with hand-painted bow: brush has seen a little more use than the others(see photos)- very minor paint wear from use to Mammy's back. Black paint drip to collar area. Natural bristles dyed red.
Small Green Mammy: green cap and blouse, small, 4.5" tall --in very good condition with exception to paint striation on face that occurred during manufacture (close-up photo makes this appear more prominent than what is seen with the eye).

Please note that many of the white spots seen in the photos are light reflections and are NOT areas of missing paint. If one looks closely, the teeny areas of missing paint can be distinguished from the light reflections.

The taller brushes are all priced at $85 each. The smaller, 4.5", green and red-dressed mammy brushes are priced at $60 each.

Please take the time to peruse our second grouping a Mammy and Porter brushes, listed separately.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1362217 (stock #BA928)
Stonegate Antiques
$795.00
Measuring 6 inches high, this highly sought after Black wax figure, which mounted on its original wooden platform, is one of a series of fascinating "street character wax dolls" conceived of and crafted by Mrs. Conception Vargas Alfonso, daughter of the world-renowned, turn-of-the-century-New Orleans, Spanish sculptor, Francisco Vargas.

From approximately 1915 through the 1930's, Mrs. Vargas-Alphonso, influenced by the artistry of her father who also sculpted in wax, crafted a variety of wax dolls inspired by the black folk she saw on New Orleans's street corners while growing up. Sold exclusively at the time through Harriet's, of 318 Rue Royale in the French Quarter of New Orleans, the completely hand-made, one-of-a-kind dolls are seldom found on today's market due to their inherently fragile nature, making them highly sought after in the Black Memorabilia Collectible arena.

This particular figure is known as The Banjo Player and is actually quite rare and very difficult to find in today's collectible market, likely because there were not as many Banjo players crafted as opposed to the more commonly found Vargas cotton pickers or praline sellers.

Vargas wax figures are distinctly characterized by their interesting but highly exaggerated facial features. The Banjo Player wears a tan hat with black band, a green flowered neck scarf, a red and yellow patterned shirt and textured, loose-fitting black pants- with all but the hat constructed of actual cloth fabric that was coated with a fine layer of clear wax to stiffen them. He supports all of his weight on his back left leg while propping his right leg up upon an actual wooden log as he plays! His wax body is internally supported by a wire frame through which the figure is attached to the wooden base via his left leg.

This wonderful figure is in very fine condition for his 85+ years of age with the following imperfections: missing left-hand fingers (an unfortunate, but extremely common consequence of time), and the most obvious imperfection being a missing section of his hat brim. It is evident that the banjo has been re-glued into position over the years---a situation which does not surprise me given that the banjo is only supported by the left hand and propped upon the right leg--not a very secure position from a constructional viewpoint.

Regardless of his minor imperfections, this VARGAS figure would be classified as in FINE condition. Wax is a very delicate and fragile medium in which to work, and some loss is expected given that these figures are fast approaching 100+ years of age. The banjo player's brilliantly executed face with open mouth filled with song, his realistic and intact banjo complete with all original strings, and his incredibly natural and realistic pose remains a most delightful snapshot of C1920 New Orleans African American cultural history!

Please note- photos were taken in interior natural light. The first two photos best represent true, actual color. Any white or light spots on the figure are a result of light glare and are not reflective of discoloration or fading.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1910 item #385670 (stock #BA497)
Stonegate Antiques
$295.00
This extremely rare, circa 1900, COMPLETE set of 4 Magic Lantern glass slides with Black Americana theme is in mint condition! True to the era in which they were produced, these 4 slides typify the black derogatory stereotypes prolific during this period.

Measuring 4 inches wide x 3 3/4 inches high, the black color-toned set was manufactured by A.D. Handy, Stereopticon & Supplies, Boston.

The four slides tell the story, through drawings and southern black dialogue, of a black boy attempting to steal a watermelon (slide 1). Four other black boys hiding behind a fence and watching, spook him, making the boy think there is a ghost behind him (slide 2)! Dropping the watermelon in fright, he dashes off for safety (slide 3). The shattered watermelon is then left on the ground, already broken into bite-sized pieces for the 4 other boys to enjoy!

This offering is truly an exceptionally scarce Black Americana collectible!!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #403067 (stock #BA502)
Stonegate Antiques
$495.00
An exceptional example of 19th century Folk Art-- a very rare needlework cross stitch sampler with Black Americana theme! This highly unusual example dates to circa 1880's and depicts two young girls on a primitive, “make-do” seesaw--- a wooden board placed over a log-- complete with a grapevine trellis in the background! This wonderful piece is accented with a multi-toned, Greek Key border design with fringe edging.

The needlework measures approximately 15 by 14 inches and is in good condition overall, given its 120+ years of age! The central design is superb with no problems, but the two upper corners show evidence of some unraveling, particularly the upper right, which has a small hole. This little hole could be repaired, or if the piece was framed, it could be visually eliminated; however, it truly does little to detract from the central focal point of the children on the seesaw, when viewed in its entirety. The piece does show subtle evidence of typical, age-related discoloration.

An utterly wonderful and scarce example of 19th century Black Americana themed Needlework!