Asian Antiques by Silk Road
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1900 item #768181 (stock #63-56)
Silk Road Gallery
$850.00
This very unusual rotund 19th century Burmese Buddha is patterned after a statue said to be carved of the wood of the sacred Bodhi tree in Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka. See a photo and description of a similar Dakkhina Sakkha Buddha in the periodical "Arts of Asia" June 1981 issue in an article on Burmese Buddha figures by Burma art expert Sylvia Fraser-Lu...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1700 item #694620 (stock #25-65)
Silk Road Gallery
$1,100.00
This limestone Buddha head has been in our collection since the mid-1990s when we purchased three of them, each with features distinctive from the others but all carved from the same stone and of Burma's Ava Period (1287-1752). The other two of the three appear to have been cut from a back slab; this one is almost fully in the round...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #877672 (stock #63-04)
Silk Road Gallery
$800.00
This mid-19th century wood offering bowl is from Pagan, an area recognized for producing the finest lacquer items in Burma. Many layers of black lacquer cover the wood base and are topped with a lacquer mixed with cinnabar pigment. These outer red layers have worn away in many places, showing the black lacquer underneath and creating an attractive patina...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Metalwork : Pre 1900 item #850952 (stock #64-08)
Silk Road Gallery
$330.00
This late 19th century bronze bell is cast in same design as the huge bells that are prominent features outside Buddhist temples and monasteries throughout Burma. It hangs from a metal crossbar that also supports a U-shaped handle flanked with “to-naya” (snake-like dragons) that match those on the bell hanger...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1910 item #882005 (stock #63-13)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
This very large lacquer tray from the Shan minority people in northeast Burma has four different patterns of basketry weaving showing through the rich persimmon-colored lacquer. Called byat, such handmade trays, used for serving food, were time-consuming to produce. Following the weaving process, each of the many successive applications of lacquer required several days of drying, then burnishing before the next coat of lacquer was applied...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Folk Art : Pre 1920 item #919136 (stock #63-64)
Silk Road Gallery
$595.00
Two kneeling nats, possibly representing the Taungbyon brothers, among the most revered deities in the Burmese spirit world of nats, are carved with identical positions and thrones but faces that are quite different from one another. Widespread belief among the Burmese of nats, the spirits of certain departed humans, and also of nat spirits of trees, rivers, rocks and more, predates the introduction of Buddhism in Burma...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Metalwork : Pre 1700 item #164750 (stock #40-84)
Silk Road Gallery
$950.00
Still bearing very slight traces of gold leaf, this small 15th century bronze head of Buddha is from Burma's Ava Period (1287-1752). It most likely was commissioned and donated by a family as an act of merit, and was buried under a stupa for centuries. The Burmese of the time were skilled metalworkers. When a bronze Buddha image was cast, even a small one such as this, astrologers were called in to name the most auspicious day and hour for the casting, and monks cleansed the site of evil spirits...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Wood : Pre 1800 item #284166 (stock #08-04)
Silk Road Gallery
$450.00
Seated on a faded red lacquer throne, this little Buddha is a humble, quiet figure. With shallow carving that suggests rather than sharply defines the facial features, the smooth oval face takes on an enigmatic, ethereal look. The small body is compactly folded to fit precisely on the narrow throne, giving the impression that the figure is conserving space. Fingers on the right hand, in earth touching mudra, are exceptionally long...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1910 item #880614 (stock #11-06)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
This large dramatic sculpture of a royal Buddha in classic Arakan style is two feet tall and crowned with curled open-work flanges flanking five intricately rendered leaf-covered spires. The practice of outfitting Buddha images in such regal style is said to have started in the Arakan Kingdom that flourished from 1287 to 1752 AD, when it became part of Burma. According to legend, an Arakan king named Jambupati (or Jambuphati) was causing suffering due to his excessive arrogance and pride...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1910 item #875686 (stock #63-20)
Silk Road Gallery
$620.00
This early 20th century lacquer betel nut container has intricate incised scenes that recreate the magical interior of the old Burmese court. Dancers, mythical animals, courtiers, and servants surround the king on this throne in vignettes that cover the deep lid and base. The inscriptions "good health" and "be rich" are etched along the top edge of the deep lid. All the scenes are surrounded by fine bands of color and foliage with a cross-hatched background...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1800 item #154386 (stock #08-07)
Silk Road Gallery
$500.00
In Burma's remote villages, Buddha images displayed in temples and homes sometimes were the work of local artisans. The figures, created with great reverence, are humble and often quite appealing. This charming 18th century folk Buddha is from the Shan people, one of the numerous ethnic groups that make up Burma's devoutly Buddhist population. The image, carved from teak wood, was coated with several layers of black lacquer and then gilded, typical for Burmese carved wood figures...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Metalwork : Pre 1910 item #786538 (stock #10-40)
Silk Road Gallery
$790.00
This bronze Buddha, with attributes true to Burma's late Ava period of the 1600s, was cast a few hundred years later in the late 19th/early 20th century. It was common practice for Burmese artisans of later periods to copy styles that originated much earlier, sometimes mixing attributes from several periods and regions...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #834732 (stock #10-62)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
A fine, tight weave of thin reeds gives texture to the cinnabar and black lacquer finish of this mid-19th century Burmese bowl. The textural quality is heightened by the wearing of top layers of cinnabar lacquer revealing black lacquer underneath for a handsome negoro effect. Resting on four low feet, the bowl, or “kwet,” flares out to a wide point about three-quarters up its height, and then gently angles in toward its crisp upper edge. The inner surface is smoothed with many coats of la...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Folk Art : Pre 1800 item #259829 (stock #08-12)
Silk Road Gallery
$750.00
The strong, primitive carving, broad face and very tall finial on this 18th century Buddha suggest that it was carved in a Mon village. The figure comes from Burma and dates to the Konbaung Period (1752-1885) when the Mon people, an ethnic minority, held some power briefly before they fled in large numbers to Thailand. This image owes its originality and charm to a village carver. Though it conforms to guidelines for representation of the Buddha, and reflects as well the popular style of the per...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1900 item #147269 (stock #39-03)
Silk Road Gallery
$2,800.00
Made during Burma's Konbaung Period (1752-1885), this crowned Pagan (Bagan) Buddha stands nearly four feet tall. The hands are in the dharmacakra (teaching) mudra. The carved lacquered and gilded wooden image is in the style of the 11th century colossal standing Buddha statues from Ananda Temple in Pagan, with a long robe open to the ankles over body hugging clothing. Also typical for this type of figure are kneecaps that are visible through the clothing. The high crown of pointed leaves topped ...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Metalwork : Pre 1920 item #888007 (stock #02-65)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
A two-part silver box in the traditional Khmer motif of a singha, a mythical lion, is covered with swirling lines simulating fur, and has a fat pouf of a tail swung up over its broad back. Though it has the open jaw and flattened ears of a protector, its aura is more friendly than fierce. With a weight of 538 grams, this box is relatively large compared with other such boxes in the genre of handmade Khmer silver pieces found in the shapes of myriad birds and animals. (See the article “Khmer Si...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1910 item #929783 (stock #63-14)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
An especially handsome lacquer bowl, called a “kwet,” is from the Shan people, a southeast Asian tribal group living primarily in northeast Burma. Similar Shan bowls, though not identical to this one, are pictured in a book from the British Museum Press entitled “Visions from the Golden Land: Burma and the Art of Lacquer” by Isaacs and Blurton, on pages 183 and 184, where they are labeled with the spelling “khwet.” This bowl has an inscription on the bottom that is difficult to deci...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Folk Art : Pre 1837 VR item #1250809 (stock #06-84)
Silk Road Gallery
$320.00
pair
These teak hangers are from Solo on the Indonesian island of Java and date to the early 19th century. Painted carvings of Hanuman, the heroic white monkey from the Southeast Asian epic, “The Ramayana,” sit atop long curved tails that form textile hangers. Fabrics can be draped so the Hanuman figures face front or to the sides. The hangers have holes at the top end so they can be either suspended or affixed directly to a wall. (See a similar set of hangers with different carved figures by ...