Asian Antiques by Silk Road
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Wood : Pre 1800 item #291897 (stock #02-34)
Silk Road Gallery
$600.00
Inscriptions cover the left and back sides of the throne under this 18th century seated Burmese Shan Buddha. Made of lacquered wood coated with gilt, the figure is graceful and well proportioned, with a finely carved face. Long, tilted eyes under high eyebrows that sweep upward toward the hairline are the most arresting features of the peaceful face, which is smoothly capped in dark lacquer and topped with an exceptionally tall finial...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Wood : Pre 1800 item #279346 (stock #08-14)
Silk Road Gallery
$675.00
Elements of folk art blended with features of a classical Burmese Buddha give great charm to this unusual 18th century lacquered and gilded wood figure. The face is finely carved and serene, with well defined brows, downcast eyes and expressive lips. The ears, angled nearly straight out with jaunty flying lobes, and the exaggerated, very high finial are areas where the carver departed tradition in expression, perhaps, of his own personal image of the Buddha...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Wood : Pre 1800 item #284166 (stock #08-04)
Silk Road Gallery
$450.00
Seated on a faded red lacquer throne, this little Buddha is a humble, quiet figure. With shallow carving that suggests rather than sharply defines the facial features, the smooth oval face takes on an enigmatic, ethereal look. The small body is compactly folded to fit precisely on the narrow throne, giving the impression that the figure is conserving space. Fingers on the right hand, in earth touching mudra, are exceptionally long...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Wood : Pre 1900 item #257200 (stock #03-17)
Silk Road Gallery
$400.00
The naga, Southeast Asia's "dragon of the sea," is a favorite protector throughout the region. This one, of weathered teak wood, is from Thailand where naga often are seen in pairs at entrances to temple grounds and positioned at intervals along roof lines. They are there to ward off evil spirits and natural disaster just as the naga is said to have protected the Buddha from lightning as he meditated under a bo tree...