Asian Antiques by Silk Road
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All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #891192 (stock #64-44)
Silk Road Gallery
$1,200.00
This late 19th century offering vessel from the Burmese city of Pagan is an exceptionally fine example of the hsun-ok containers used to carry food offerings to Buddhist monasteries and temples. It is made of wood covered with many coats of lacquer, black first and then top layers of rich deep red. As the red lacquer wears away in areas exposing the black, a handsome negoro effect is created. A similar wooden hsun-ok is pictured in “Burmese Crafts Past and Present,” by Sylvia Fraser-Lu, Oxfo...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Pre 1837 VR item #839958 (stock #10-81)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
An unusually large early to mid-19th century Shan hsun-ok from Burma, this piece has a diameter of 19 inches and stands 32 inches high. Full size offering bowls with the distinctive hsun-ok silhouette generally are about 13 to 15 inches in diameter. This one is a masterpiece of balance with the ten identifying Shan raised rings around the lid echoed with 10 raised rings around base. The carvings on the spire, punctuated by a large ball, complement the substantial circumference of the piece. Its...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Furniture : Pre 1920 item #278822 (stock #60-16)
Silk Road Gallery
$250.00
As a nation of tea drinkers, the Chinese have lavished care on the artistry of implements associated with tea. This handsome wood box originated in Shaoxing, near Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, and was used for storing small, handle-less teacups. Wood boxes for this purpose were made throughout China in a variety of shapes, some with large, fold-down handles such as this one, some with fixed handles, some with no handles. The type and amount of carving and other decoration also varied but almost w...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #877672 (stock #63-04)
Silk Road Gallery
$800.00
This mid-19th century wood offering bowl is from Pagan, an area recognized for producing the finest lacquer items in Burma. Many layers of black lacquer cover the wood base and are topped with a lacquer mixed with cinnabar pigment. These outer red layers have worn away in many places, showing the black lacquer underneath and creating an attractive patina. (For a similar offering bowl see "Burmese Crafts Past and Present" by Sylvia Fraser-Lu, Oxford University Press, 1994, color plate 45.) The ta...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Folk Art : Pre 1900 item #1065987 (stock #62-56)
Silk Road Gallery
$295.00
Rich auburn elmwood with a satin smooth surface makes this late 19th century hand-hewn Chinese food box an especially attractive shelf or table accent piece. It is constructed of shaped staves fitted tightly together and held with flat brass bands around the foot and the widest part of the vessel. Carvings on the side handles of lotus buds on long stems, both Taoist and Buddhist emblems of perfection, are appropriate for a food box because every part of the lotus plant is deemed edible by the C...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1800 item #799411 (stock #57-43)
Silk Road Gallery
$1,700.00
Traces of gold leaf remain on this Pagan dry lacquer Buddha head from the late 1700s. The head rests on a contemporary removable black metal stand. The dry lacquer technique, used by Burmese artisans from the mid-18th century until the beginning of the 20th century, produced finely modeled hollow images that were light in weight but very strong. The labor-intensive method involved a number of steps. First the image was shaped from clay, then wrapped in a lacquer-soaked cloth. A pliable mixture ...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #815705 (stock #12-44)
Silk Road Gallery
$250.00
A small lacquer box incised with the Burmese “yun” technique has an unusual lid design of a scarf encircled with foliage. Using the yun method, the pattern is accomplished by cutting through top layers of lacquer to reveal one or more differently colored lacquer layers underneath. In this case, just black and light red lacquers were used, producing a container with a simplicity that sets it apart from the multi-colored intricate yun work seen on the larger cylindrical betel boxes from Burma....
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Folk Art : Pre 1920 item #800706 (stock #58-47)
Silk Road Gallery
$175.00
Among the many varieties of red lacquered containers used during China's Qing and early Republic years, none has a more striking form than the humble lunch pail. An elegantly designed everyday item, it is constructed of shaped wood staves, a tall bent willow handle and a notched lid that snaps securely in place around the handle. Pails in this design also are referred to as berry pails. The recessed bottom on this one is decorated with two drawings of flowers, perhaps done by the maker of the pa...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1837 VR item #262688 (stock #57-54)
Silk Road Gallery
$250.00
The deep, close-fitting lid, two interior trays and small size of this luminous cinnabar-colored box suggest that it was used to carry a personal supply of ingredients for assembling a quid of betel. Betel leaves would have been stored in the bottom, and areca nuts, lime and spices carried on the trays. The container dates from the early 19th century. A subtle tortoise shell design covers the top and side of the lid. The side and bottom of the box are decorated with narrow bands of incised lines...
All Items : Popular Collectibles : Cultural : Contemporary item #1235821 (stock #14-70)
Silk Road Gallery
$275.00
A teakwood jewelry box with deep carvings of lotus flowers, dragons and a peacock recalls Nepal’s old city of Bhaktapur, where streets are lined with lavishly carved windows and courtyards and above it all are the snow-covered peaks of the Himalayas as a backdrop. This piece has 14 “secret” compartments hidden in the top, middle and lower levels inside the box (see photo enlargements #4, 5 and 6). The lid slides off to reveal the top six compartments, which in turn slide to allow access t...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1910 item #780643 (stock #12-42)
Silk Road Gallery
$250.00
Tiny yellow dots incised freehand into a black lacquer background cover this small early 20th Burmese box. The design, produced with a time-consuming technique called "yun," is one of the more subtle traditional yun patterns developed by Burmese lacquer artisans. Yun involves the use of a stylus to engrave designs, one color at a time, on a lacquer surface. The yellow, red and green patterns on this box required three separate sessions of engraving with the stylus, rubbing the color into the inc...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1910 item #1136045 (stock #63-11)
Silk Road Gallery
$370.00
The cinnabar lacquer covering this late 19th/early 20th century Burmese “kwet,” or serving bowl, is satin smooth and cool to the touch. Years of daily use have enhanced both the look and feel of this large bowl, with black lacquer showing through the red in areas of wear. Six black ribs curve down to the feet, and the top is curved and rolled inward, giving the vessel beautiful balance. The old Burmese process of producing such lacquer pieces was labor intensive and time consuming. Woven an...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Folk Art : Pre 1910 item #1245419 (stock #60-25)
Silk Road Gallery
$260.00
This late Qing Dynasty teacup box has a high handle carved with the figure of a deer, an auspicious Chinese symbol used to wish longevity. Foliage, flowers and scalloping also are carved on both sides of the handle as well as on the ear-like curved ends that hold the handle in place. The rich red lacquer on the wooden box contrasts nicely with touches of deep, dark green and faint gilding. The container is fitted with a removable half-lid that allowed stacks of traditional Chinese teacups witho...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Folk Art : Pre 1800 item #259829 (stock #08-12)
Silk Road Gallery
$750.00
The strong, primitive carving, broad face and very tall finial on this 18th century Buddha suggest that it was carved in a Mon village. The figure comes from Burma and dates to the Konbaung Period (1752-1885) when the Mon people, an ethnic minority, held some power briefly before they fled in large numbers to Thailand. This image owes its originality and charm to a village carver. Though it conforms to guidelines for representation of the Buddha, and reflects as well the popular style of the per...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1910 item #875686 (stock #63-20)
Silk Road Gallery
$620.00
This early 20th century lacquer betel nut container has intricate incised scenes that recreate the magical interior of the old Burmese court. Dancers, mythical animals, courtiers, and servants surround the king on this throne in vignettes that cover the deep lid and base. The inscriptions "good health" and "be rich" are etched along the top edge of the deep lid. All the scenes are surrounded by fine bands of color and foliage with a cross-hatched background. Two trays that slide inside the high...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #268585 (stock #57-71)
Silk Road Gallery
$365.00
With its lovely chu-pan foliage design, this 19th century cosmetic (bi-it) box shows the Burmese skill at fine lacquer work. The maker's name is prominently displayed on the lid in a banner carried aloft by a lively nat (spirit). Called a bi-it, the container was used to hold sandalwood powder, which was mixed with water to form a paste applied by Burmese women to their face as a skin refiner and sunscreen. Made by layering many coats of lacquer over a base of thin wood and coiled bamboo strips,...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Scholar Art : Pre 1900 item #291633 (stock #60-22)
Silk Road Gallery
$400.00
Elegant wood boxes with drawers and compartments were regarded by Chinese scholars as essential for the storage of the small personal items they valued. Their carved signature seals and ink sticks often were stored in these boxes, which usually were kept on a desk in the scholar's study but were small enough to be moved easily into the courtyard when he preferred to work outside. This late 19th century box has three drawers and a compartment with two doors made of nicely beaded panels. Door pane...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Folk Art : Pre 1910 item #1233407 (stock #12-64)
Silk Road Gallery
$250.00
From China’s Shaanxi Province, known for its many types of marvelous dumplings, this late Qing woven reed basket opens clamshell fashion to form two large serving bowls. Wide bent willow bands painted with flowers and secured to the basketry with metal studs encircle the top and bottom sections. A metal hasp in the front is used to keep the top and bottom closed, and a metal ring in the back is used to keep the two sections attached when they are used as bowls. This piece shows appropriate ...