Asian Antiques by Silk Road
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All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1800 item #799411 (stock #57-43)
Silk Road Gallery
$1,700.00
Traces of gold leaf remain on this Pagan dry lacquer Buddha head from the late 1700s. The head rests on a contemporary removable black metal stand. The dry lacquer technique, used by Burmese artisans from the mid-18th century until the beginning of the 20th century, produced finely modeled hollow images that were light in weight but very strong. The labor-intensive method involved a number of steps. First the image was shaped from clay, then wrapped in a lacquer-soaked cloth. A pliable mixture ...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #877672 (stock #63-04)
Silk Road Gallery
$800.00
This mid-19th century wood offering bowl is from Pagan, an area recognized for producing the finest lacquer items in Burma. Many layers of black lacquer cover the wood base and are topped with a lacquer mixed with cinnabar pigment. These outer red layers have worn away in many places, showing the black lacquer underneath and creating an attractive patina. (For a similar offering bowl see "Burmese Crafts Past and Present" by Sylvia Fraser-Lu, Oxford University Press, 1994, color plate 45.) The ta...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Folk Art : Pre 1900 item #876853 (stock #58-78)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
A late 19th century Chinese box made for storing small teacups, this piece is an example of an everyday utilitarian object with design and workmanship that stands the test of time. The box is constructed of shaped wood staves fitted together in barrel fashion and secured top and bottom with brass bands. The lid is in two parts, with the back half affixed and the front half removable so that the stacked cups were secure but easily taken out of the container. The box is lacquered in dark red and t...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #261283 (stock #57-66)
Silk Road Gallery
$175.00
The lid of this 19th century Burmese lacquer traveler's box is incised with a charming scene of two figures, separated by a tree, each of them with one hand raised in a farewell wave. Made by layering many coats of lacquer over a base constructed of fine strips of coiled bamboo, Burmese lacquerware is light and durable. The design on this box is hand drawn using a method called yun-incising. Lines were incised through the top coats of black lacquer to reveal the persimmon-colored lacquer underne...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #268585 (stock #57-71)
Silk Road Gallery
$365.00
With its lovely chu-pan foliage design, this 19th century cosmetic (bi-it) box shows the Burmese skill at fine lacquer work. The maker's name is prominently displayed on the lid in a banner carried aloft by a lively nat (spirit). Called a bi-it, the container was used to hold sandalwood powder, which was mixed with water to form a paste applied by Burmese women to their face as a skin refiner and sunscreen. Made by layering many coats of lacquer over a base of thin wood and coiled bamboo strips,...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #687835 (stock #64-37)
Silk Road Gallery
$1,200.00
Sale Pending
Finely modeled scenes from the "Jataka," stories of important events in the life of the Buddha, cover the lid and three sides of this "sadaik," or manuscript chest, from a Burmese monastery. (See similar chests in an article in "Arts of Asia" magazine, May-June 2013 issue, page 82, by Sylvia Fraser-Lu, with detailed information on Jataka stories depicted on manuscript chests.) The lid on this chest shows two scenes especially revered in Burma: The first is a compelling representation of the Budd...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Metalwork : Pre 1920 item #888007 (stock #02-65)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
A two-part silver box in the traditional Khmer motif of a singha, a mythical lion, is covered with swirling lines simulating fur, and has a fat pouf of a tail swung up over its broad back. Though it has the open jaw and flattened ears of a protector, its aura is more friendly than fierce. With a weight of 538 grams, this box is relatively large compared with other such boxes in the genre of handmade Khmer silver pieces found in the shapes of myriad birds and animals. (See the article “Khmer Si...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #896352 (stock #63-23)
Silk Road Gallery
$695.00
An offering stand, or “kalat,” used by the Intha people who live in the villages around Inle Lake in one of the Shan states in northeastern Burma, is from the late 19th century. A similar though more recent piece in the British Museum is pictured in “Visions from the Golden Land: Burma and the Art of Lacquer,” by Isaacs and Blurton, British Museum Press, p. 163. Kalat stands such as this were used by families in much the same manner as the tall, spired hsun-ok to carry offerings of food ...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1910 item #1136045 (stock #63-11)
Silk Road Gallery
$370.00
The cinnabar lacquer covering this late 19th/early 20th century Burmese “kwet,” or serving bowl, is satin smooth and cool to the touch. Years of daily use have enhanced both the look and feel of this large bowl, with black lacquer showing through the red in areas of wear. Six black ribs curve down to the feet, and the top is curved and rolled inward, giving the vessel beautiful balance. The old Burmese process of producing such lacquer pieces was labor intensive and time consuming. Woven an...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #1239618 (stock #63-26)
Silk Road Gallery
$500.00
This cinnabar-colored four-piece lacquer box from late 19th century Burma has intricate designs incised in fine black lines on its hatbox-style lid, high-sided container and two trays. The tortoise shell design is interspersed with small circles, and the lid top is centered with a gold-accented drawing of a character in native dress. Cylindrical boxes such as this, called “kun-it,” were designed for storing and serving ingredients to assemble a quid, or chew, of betel, a mild stimulant tha...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #815705 (stock #12-44)
Silk Road Gallery
$250.00
A small lacquer box incised with the Burmese “yun” technique has an unusual lid design of a scarf encircled with foliage. Using the yun method, the pattern is accomplished by cutting through top layers of lacquer to reveal one or more differently colored lacquer layers underneath. In this case, just black and light red lacquers were used, producing a container with a simplicity that sets it apart from the multi-colored intricate yun work seen on the larger cylindrical betel boxes from Burma....
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #898500 (stock #63-30)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
A late 19th century lacquer betel box from Burma is incised in an intricate pattern called “yok-thei,” with tiny dancers swirling through vegetal scrolling. The small design, primarily red and green, is punctuated with black and green circles that look like launching pads for the flying stylized dancers. (For a betel box with a similar yok-thei pattern, see color plate # 41 in “Burmese Crafts Past and Present,” by Sylvia Fraser-Lu, Oxford University Press, 1994.) This is one of the more...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Folk Art : Pre 1800 item #259829 (stock #08-12)
Silk Road Gallery
$750.00
The strong, primitive carving, broad face and very tall finial on this 18th century Buddha suggest that it was carved in a Mon village. The figure comes from Burma and dates to the Konbaung Period (1752-1885) when the Mon people, an ethnic minority, held some power briefly before they fled in large numbers to Thailand. This image owes its originality and charm to a village carver. Though it conforms to guidelines for representation of the Buddha, and reflects as well the popular style of the per...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1910 item #875686 (stock #63-20)
Silk Road Gallery
$620.00
This early 20th century lacquer betel nut container has intricate incised scenes that recreate the magical interior of the old Burmese court. Dancers, mythical animals, courtiers, and servants surround the king on this throne in vignettes that cover the deep lid and base. The inscriptions "good health" and "be rich" are etched along the top edge of the deep lid. All the scenes are surrounded by fine bands of color and foliage with a cross-hatched background. Two trays that slide inside the high...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #854196 (stock #10-68)
Silk Road Gallery
$390.00
This large lacquered early 20th century bowl from the Shan people, who live primarily in eastern parts of Burma and across the border in western and northern areas of Thailand, is called a “kwet” and was used to serve huge quantities of rice. It is made of split bamboo basketry supported by six sturdy ribs that curve down to end in six low feet. The basic bamboo construction is coated inside and out with layers of black lacquer overlaid with layers of red lacquer. The basketry shows through ...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1980 item #811124 (stock #64-05)
Silk Road Gallery
$450.00
The monks Sariputta and Mogallana have been honored in Burmese Buddhist art as the two chief disciples of Buddha for more than 800 years, as evidenced by their images on 12th century plaques excavated at Pagan. Until the late 18th century they were most often integrated into carvings and bronzes of the Buddha. After artisans started carving and casting each of the figures separately, the pose of each monk evolved into the traditional poses seen on these black lacquered carvings, and now vary mai...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Folk Art : Pre 1910 item #1245419 (stock #60-25)
Silk Road Gallery
$260.00
This late Qing Dynasty teacup box has a high handle carved with the figure of a deer, an auspicious Chinese symbol used to wish longevity. Foliage, flowers and scalloping also are carved on both sides of the handle as well as on the ear-like curved ends that hold the handle in place. The rich red lacquer on the wooden box contrasts nicely with touches of deep, dark green and faint gilding. The container is fitted with a removable half-lid that allowed stacks of traditional Chinese teacups witho...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Folk Art : Pre 1920 item #919136 (stock #63-64)
Silk Road Gallery
$595.00
Two kneeling nats, possibly representing the Taungbyon brothers, among the most revered deities in the Burmese spirit world of nats, are carved with identical positions and thrones but faces that are quite different from one another. Widespread belief among the Burmese of nats, the spirits of certain departed humans, and also of nat spirits of trees, rivers, rocks and more, predates the introduction of Buddhism in Burma. Thirty-seven nats, both protectors and rogues, each with its own complex s...